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-   -   Strida 1 Ball Socket Repair/Replacement (http://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bikes/537546-strida-1-ball-socket-repair-replacement.html)

Bob Pringle 05-03-09 10:21 AM

Strida 1 Ball Socket Repair/Replacement
 
5 Attachment(s)
A few weeks ago I picked up a Strida 1 at a yard sale. When I got it home I found that the ball socket plastic moldings at the top of the steering tube were trashed. Having no luck finding replacements I decided to improvise.

I purchased a short length of 6061-T6 tubing, 1.250" outside diameter by .083" wall thickness, from Metalsonline.com for $7.50/foot. Then I purchased part numbers CYSP215S, CYSP215P, and CYSP250 from John Ficek at Strida USA for $7.30.

I cut the tubing diagonally at 30 degrees and then perpendicularly at an overall length of 4.312". Holes were then drilled in the tube to accommodate the cable pipe, part no. CYSP215P, and the attachment screw, a 5mm by 12mm round head screw.

Next the Strida steerer tube was cut off just below the point where it was swaged down to allow installation of the original stem/handlebar, about 4" below the original ball socket in the molded plastic halves. An old seat post of 27.2mm diameter was cut off to provide a piece 5" long. This piece was then coated with JB Weld and inserted 3" into the cut off steerer tube. 24 hours later the fabricated section of tubing was JB Welded onto the exposed 2" of the seatpost with the diagonal cut up and facing the rear of the bike and this joint was allowed to cure for 24 hours.

A handlebar stem from Specialized, which has a steerer bore of 1.300", was slipped over the fabricated tube along with a .020" thick aluminum shim on the lower 2" of the fabricated tube and then clamped in place using the stems 2 clamping bolts. The socket pair, part no. CYSP215S, was spread apart enough to encompass the ball at the top of the Strida seat tube and then inserted into the fabricated section of tubing. The cable pipe, part no. CYSP215P, was then pressed in place through the fabricated tube and the brake cables inserted in the steerer tube and the seat tube.

The rear brake cable was not threaded though the cable pipe because this would have created too much of a bend in the cable housing; it was passed around the right side of the ball/socket joint instead. A handlebar shim was made from 1.250" outside diameter by .125" wall plastic pipe to adapt a 1" clamp dia. handlebar to the Specialized stem, which was made for a 1.25" clamp dia. handlebar.

The conversion has worked out quite well and I'm now adapting to the quick handling characteristic of the Strida.

If anyone would like a detailed drawing of the fabricated tube mentioned above, let me know!

Regards,
Bob P.

CosmosGalileo 06-07-09 02:54 PM

Bob,

Hello. Nice repair on your Strida. Yes I would like to have a copy of the drawing you mentioned that you have available.

Also, the phone number for the gentleman at STRIDA USA would be helpful.


Thanks,

Larry Rossi
CosmosGalileo

c_pedrick 06-05-16 05:47 PM

Hi Bob,
thanks for pioneering, pls send drawing if possible

anything you would do different? Handle bar displacement?

I will try a similar process
thx
chris

Bill Wilby 06-06-16 09:04 AM

Great job on the Strida Bob, thank you for sharing. I have those parts in stock too and also most every other Strida part available for Stridas 5.0 and newer.

cheers, Bill

Disclaimer, I am the Canadian Strida Distributor


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