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Old 06-10-09, 02:17 PM   #1
DLBroox
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cateye setting

Anyone set up a cateye wireless for Kenda Kwest tires 20 x 1.25? Looking for the number to enter without actually having to figure it out myself!
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Old 06-10-09, 03:05 PM   #2
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Sheldon brown for heavens sake.
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Old 06-10-09, 04:20 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by DLBroox View Post
Anyone set up a cateye wireless for Kenda Kwest tires 20 x 1.25? Looking for the number to enter without actually having to figure it out myself!
I am using Kojak tires (ERTRO 35-406) and setup my Cateye Strada Wireless for 1500.

I compared it yesterday with GPS tracker of my phone and the strada has 5% miles more than the phone.

BTW, the manual and the wheel table is here if it helps:

http://www.cateye.com/sites/cateye/u...W_ENG%2Bv3.pdf

Kam
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Old 06-10-09, 05:06 PM   #4
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Here ya go: 406mm + 2*1.25*25.4mm = 470mm; pi*407 = 1475mm.
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Old 06-10-09, 06:08 PM   #5
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Cool, thanks Jur!
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Old 06-10-09, 06:15 PM   #6
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Here ya go: 406mm + 2*1.25*25.4mm = 470mm; pi*407 = 1475mm.
Thanks Jur. I did not know that the Strada units are in mm.

How did you determine that the tire height height on each side is 1.25"? Is it the same as its width? I would expect it to be about the half of the width.

Kam
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Old 06-11-09, 01:43 AM   #7
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It's easy to do a roll out.

1. Put the bike on a flat surface.

2. Make a chalk mark on the ground and the tyre where the tyre contacts the ground. Do it in the middle of the contact patch.

3. Roll the bike forward until the chalk mark on the tyre is again in the centre of the ground contact patch, but one wheel revolution further forward.

4 Make another mark on the ground at the centre of the contact patch.

5. Measure the distance between the two marks on the ground.


Job done. Any wheel. Any tyre. No tables needed. Just measure and mark carefully and use a thin chalk to get accurate marks.



If you have no chalk, just use the tyre valve as the reference point on the wheel and place a matchstick on the ground at either end of the wheel roll out.

Last edited by EvilV; 06-11-09 at 01:46 AM.
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Old 06-11-09, 03:57 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by kamtsa View Post
Thanks Jur. I did not know that the Strada units are in mm.

How did you determine that the tire height height on each side is 1.25"? Is it the same as its width? I would expect it to be about the half of the width.

Kam
Height is about the same as width measured from the bead seat. It's close, gives about a 1% accuracy from what I checked on my own bikes. I always use the rollout method given above by EvilV but have always been surprised at how close the calculated amount comes (I'm an engineer, see, we measure with a micrometer, mark off with chalk and cut with an axe).
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Old 06-11-09, 12:20 PM   #9
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........but have always been surprised at how close the calculated amount comes (I'm an engineer, see, we measure with a micrometer, mark off with chalk and cut with an axe).
I thought you'd use a chainsaw for cutting now we are in the twenty-first century. It's cool as long as you remember which side of the line you have to cut to.

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Old 06-11-09, 05:07 PM   #10
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It's cool as long as you remember which side of the line you have to cut to.

Usually the other side.
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Old 06-23-09, 07:34 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by EvilV View Post
It's easy to do a roll out.

1. Put the bike on a flat surface.

2. Make a chalk mark on the ground and the tyre where the tyre contacts the ground. Do it in the middle of the contact patch.

3. Roll the bike forward until the chalk mark on the tyre is again in the centre of the ground contact patch, but one wheel revolution further forward.

4 Make another mark on the ground at the centre of the contact patch.

5. Measure the distance between the two marks on the ground.


Job done. Any wheel. Any tyre. No tables needed. Just measure and mark carefully and use a thin chalk to get accurate marks.



If you have no chalk, just use the tyre valve as the reference point on the wheel and place a matchstick on the ground at either end of the wheel roll out.
+ 1 Do what the man says and you will be pretty darn close. I use 1504 for my 20x 1.5 Kwest.
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Old 06-23-09, 07:59 PM   #12
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+ 1 Do what the man says and you will be pretty darn close. I use 1504 for my 20x 1.5 Kwest.
Try 2500. You will be amazed how it speed up the bike.

;-)

Kam
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Old 06-24-09, 02:13 AM   #13
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Try 2500. You will be amazed how it speed up the bike.

;-)

Kam


I need to try that.
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