Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    125
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Security and folding bikes

    One of the great benefits of a folding bike is that you never have to leave it out overnight or
    for long periods during the day.
    But I typically use my bike for errands and still need to lock it up.
    Im not sure if the approach to security is any different compared with full sized bikes.

    1. Are folding bikes more attractive to thieves?
    2. Are thefts of quick release wheels less common due to the less common purchase of folding bikes.
    3. My plan is to use a good U-lock to secure the frame and a cable loop through the quick release wheel.
    I plan to replace the quick-release seatpost with an allen key bolt.
    4. Does registering your bike with public agencies actually help theft recovery?

    Please share any additional tips.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    crazy bike girl msincredible's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Santa Cruz mountains
    My Bikes
    '07 Orbea Onix, '07 Birdy Yellow, '06 Cannondale Bad Boy (stolen)
    Posts
    3,319
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by techman View Post
    1. Are folding bikes more attractive to thieves?
    IMO if you lock it folded, it will generally be less attractive because it looks like a "broken" bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by techman View Post
    2. Are thefts of quick release wheels less common due to the less common purchase of folding bikes.
    Doubtful, people steal stuff just cause they can, not necessarily because it's useful.

    Quote Originally Posted by techman View Post
    3. My plan is to use a good U-lock to secure the frame and a cable loop through the quick release wheel.
    I'd fold it and get the U-lock and cable around as much as you possibly can.

    Quote Originally Posted by techman View Post
    4. Does registering your bike with public agencies actually help theft recovery?
    Unlikely (may depend on where you live) but it might be helpful with insurance claims?
    Countries I've ridden in: US, Canada, Ireland, UK, Germany, Netherlands, France, China, Singapore, Malaysia
    States I've ridden in: Illinois, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, California, Nevada, Missouri, Colorado

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    England
    Posts
    12,248
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In London, Brompton bikes are a particular target but otherwise folded bikes tend to be low on the shopping list of thieves.
    A tough cable lock may be more useful than a shackle U-lock for the odd shape of most folder.
    I replaced my QR levers with a simple anti-theft style skewer, just enough to deter casual tampering, not a tooled up professional. Pitlocks are much better but more expensive.

  4. #4
    AEO
    AEO is offline
    Senior Member AEO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
    My Bikes
    Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin
    Posts
    12,245
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    you can still defeat pitlocks with cone wrenches.
    if a theif wants it bad enough, they'll get it.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Riga, Latvia
    Posts
    10,060
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AEO View Post
    you can still defeat pitlocks with cone wrenches.
    if a theif wants it bad enough, they'll get it.
    Jaa, anything is possible, but just how probable it is another story......thieves don't run around with cone wrenches.....

  6. #6
    AEO
    AEO is offline
    Senior Member AEO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
    My Bikes
    Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin
    Posts
    12,245
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    well, cars are robbed of their wheels too, so nothing is improbable.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

  7. #7
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Riga, Latvia
    Posts
    10,060
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AEO View Post
    well, cars are robbed of their wheels too, so nothing is improbable.
    Do you really think that thieves are running around with cone wrenches and stealing bog standard wheelsets locked with locking skewers? We can let our minds run wild with 'what ifs' but I prefer to stay grounded in the reality of what is actually happening.

    What's the next panic? Getting jumped when unlocking your bike? Maybe we should all be armed......just in case.....

  8. #8
    Professional Fuss-Budget Bacciagalupe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    6,305
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    IMO, if you're leaving the bike outside, folded or unfolded the risks are about the same as with any other bike.

    I'd use a good cable lock. I wouldn't worry too much about wheel theft, unless you've noticed it a lot where you are.

    As to registration, I think it can help. The main thing is that if it does get stolen, in a few cases it'll end up on Craigslist or a local flea market, in which case you can eminently prove that the bike was in fact yours. Without registration, it might be tougher to make that case.

  9. #9
    Banned. folder fanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Anti Social Media-Land
    Posts
    3,076
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Ziemas View Post
    Do you really think that thieves are running around with cone wrenches and stealing bog standard wheelsets locked with locking skewers? We can let our minds run wild with 'what ifs' but I prefer to stay grounded in the reality of what is actually happening.

    What's the next panic? Getting jumped when unlocking your bike? Maybe we should all be armed......just in case.....
    It depends on where you live and work. As for me, anything that is either useful and/or can be sold is up for grabs. Any type of bike is very attractive to these jokers. I have one rule of thumb for any bike I use or own-if I have to run errands or the like that causes or tempts me to lock it up, the bike stays home.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bacciagalupe View Post
    IMO, if you're leaving the bike outside, folded or unfolded the risks are about the same as with any other bike.

    I'd use a good cable lock. I wouldn't worry too much about wheel theft, unless you've noticed it a lot where you are.

    As to registration, I think it can help. The main thing is that if it does get stolen, in a few cases it'll end up on Craigslist or a local flea market, in which case you can eminently prove that the bike was in fact yours. Without registration, it might be tougher to make that case.
    Nice calm middle income approuches, but where I live, it is a cruel joke. I purchased my folders since they are the only bikes I ever had that survived this long from theft, no matter what locking technique or locks I used. They have been tested in one of the most dangerous and bike theft prone areas in South-Central & East Los Angeles and survived for over 5 years. No other bikes I had ever approuched this.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Ziemas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Riga, Latvia
    Posts
    10,060
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by folder fanatic View Post
    It depends on where you live and work. As for me, anything that is either useful and/or can be sold is up for grabs. Any type of bike is very attractive to these jokers. I have one rule of thumb for any bike I use or own-if I have to run errands or the like that causes or tempts me to lock it up, the bike stays home.
    It's sad that your fear of theft keeps you from riding as much as you could.

  11. #11
    PDR
    PDR is offline
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cheshire, North West England, UK
    My Bikes
    Brompton S2L-X, Bridgestone Moulton, 1963 & 1966 Moultons, Scott Mountain bike
    Posts
    555
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The whole point of a folding bike, especially something as compact as a Brompton is that you can take it anywhere.

    Iíve been using folders for nearly 2 years now and have never carried a lock. I live in England and my covered Brompton has never been refused entry into any building.

    If you are constantly having to lock a bike outside, why not get a knackered looking standard bike that would be less attractive to thieves?

  12. #12
    Senior Member alhedges's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Naptown
    My Bikes
    NWT 24sp DD; Brompton M6R
    Posts
    1,122
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Techman, IMO the answer is that you should lock it up the same way you lock up a regular bike, keeping in mind that some options may not be available due to the geometry of the bike. I like the sheldon brown locking strategy: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html

    I'm in the process of ordering pitlocks so I won't need to lock my front wheel; this will save me a little bit of time every time I lock the bike.

    It's hard to generalize about locking bikes, though, because it is very location dependent. There are a small handful of cities in the US where bike thieves will regularly use tools to steal bikes - NY, Boston, LA, SF...probably a few more cities in CA. There is a developed secondary market in these areas for not just stolen bikes, but for stolen bike parts. In these places you need heavy locks, or are better off just carrying your bike inside with you.

    In most of the rest of the country (including, IMO, Chicago) the thefts that occur are more opportunity thefts, and the bike part thefts that occur are more akin to vandalism than to theft. So a bike that isn't locked might be stolen, and a bike that is locked to itself might be tossed into a car or truck. Unlocked seat posts or wheels might be stolen, but this tends to be vandalism; there is no place that a a thief can resell a seat or seatpost or random tire. (Which doesn't put the victim in any better position than he would have been in if the part was stolen for resale). In these locations, hybrids are actually more at risk than road bikes since they can be more easily resold (or, often, used by the perpetrator). Very small cable locks might be cut if the bike is left somewhere overnight repeatedly and the criminal has a tool at home - typically a hacksaw - that will cut it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •