Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 06-01-10, 12:53 AM   #1
snafu21
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
snafu21's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: The Mangroves, UK
Bikes: None.
Posts: 1,896
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The 2010 Devil's Thread: Hub Gear vs Dérailleur

Annoying thread warning: Contains ill-manners, abuse, man-bonding, psychotic rants, limp-wristed sycophancy, character assassinations, sociopathic assaults on the entire intellect of the cycling world, vapid and lengthy off-topic essays, and little of any lasting value.

And you thought it was just a bicycle thread.

Let battle commence:

Last edited by snafu21; 06-24-10 at 02:20 PM.
snafu21 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 01:21 AM   #2
owenfinn
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Yokohama, Japan
Bikes: Marin Muirwoods 29er, Pacific Carryme, Yuba Mundo, Dahon Boardwalk D7
Posts: 479
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Best post EVER!

I`ve had both a hub and Capreo derailleur on the same model bike - I greatly prefer the derailleur.
owenfinn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 02:14 AM   #3
nigelme
Lonesome No More
 
nigelme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: London
Bikes: Downtube IX FS, Brompton M6 LX, Moulton, Dahon HG7
Posts: 264
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have on my Moulton a dual contraption known as a '3x7' - which is a 3-speed Sram Hub gear with 7 cogs worth of durale...deur..de..the other sort. I can change on the move or stationary.

It's heavy with more things to go wrong and only 3 speed in the hub surely isn't too much evil.

I would say it's OK! but my vote goes to the Integrated Hub Gear because all the gubbins is hidden and I don't like seeing gubbins exposed and covered in dirt.

I also have a Brompton with a 3x2 - Don't get me or anyone else started on what's wrong with that!

Dérailleur: 2 -- Hub Gear: 1

Last edited by nigelme; 06-01-10 at 02:16 AM. Reason: more info
nigelme is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 02:48 AM   #4
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 6,963
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 90 Post(s)
I vote fixie.

I don't have any so they must be good.
jur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 03:23 AM   #5
stevegor
Senior Member
 
stevegor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Oz
Bikes: lots... even a Raleigh twenty !!!
Posts: 2,117
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Horses for courses.

Give me a Rohloff hub gear for touring, commuting or pootling

But for serious fast pace riding..... NOTHING beats a Derailleur system, enough said.


Derailleur: 3 Hub Gear: 1
stevegor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 04:00 AM   #6
bhkyte
Senior Member
 
bhkyte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: York UK
Bikes: 2X dualdrive Mezzo folder,plus others
Posts: 2,869
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
I vote dual drive as I hate front mechs!

There I got away with out spelling drailer,dylerer,drayleeer, derayleer,draelerer,dayrleer,(rear mech)................................daisy,drawleer,trawler,rear thingy,............................................................................................. ..........................daywaster.....

Last edited by bhkyte; 06-01-10 at 04:05 AM.
bhkyte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 07:28 AM   #7
SesameCrunch
Eschew Obfuscation
 
SesameCrunch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Bikes: 2005 Fuji Professional, 2002 Lemond Zurich, Folders - Strida, Merc, Dahon, Downtube, Recumbent folder
Posts: 3,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Snafu, you trouble-maker - stirring the pot again! Answering this is too hard! It's like asking me which of my girlfriends I love the most . How can I possibly choose?


Well, the answer depends on the application, doesn't it? What kind of bike ride are you doing? Slow pootle to get ice cream, or 8 day solo touring, or racing with your testosterone-laden roadie group?

My problem is - I love them all! I like my Duomatic (almost fixie-like), love my clunky Brompton 6 speed bodge, love my Schlumpf, love the Capreo. They're all fun and interesting. I guess that's why I have so many folders - too much love to give...

OK, OK, if you really force me to choose. If you threaten to scratch the paint on my Moulton unless I answer. If you threaten to weld my Brompton so that it never folds again...I would grudgingly answer with the Capreo derayler system. There, now you have it. Now all my other folders won't love me anymore. Are you happy now?
__________________
SesameCrunch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 07:36 AM   #8
SesameCrunch
Eschew Obfuscation
 
SesameCrunch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Bikes: 2005 Fuji Professional, 2002 Lemond Zurich, Folders - Strida, Merc, Dahon, Downtube, Recumbent folder
Posts: 3,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Pssst! You can set this up as a poll to save you from having to count all the responses yourself...
__________________
SesameCrunch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 08:24 AM   #9
invisiblehand
Part-time epistemologist
 
invisiblehand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes: Jamis Nova, Bike Friday NWT, STRIDA, Austro Daimler Vent Noir, Haluzak Horizon, Salsa La Raza, Hollands Tourer, Bike Friday tikit
Posts: 5,636
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Ahhhhhh ... we might as well get this annual conversation over with ...

I'll vote derailer -- ala Sheldon Brown -- since in most circumstances it is the better choice, IMO.

Essentially, I think that derailer systems are very robust to the point that the increased robustness of an IGH is not worthwhile in most circumstances. Derailer drivetrains are also more available, cheaper, lighter, and very easy to fix.

If you have a super small wheel -- roughly less than the 20" sizes -- then I would seriously consider an IGH. I would also consider an IGH for a multimode commuter.

D: 4
IGH: 2
__________________
A narrative on bicycle driving.
invisiblehand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 09:09 AM   #10
brakemeister 
New usename ThorUSA
 
brakemeister's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Southern Illinois USA
Bikes:
Posts: 2,469
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
on a steel or alloy frame ?
__________________
www.thorusa.com
Dahon : Freedom Unfolds
Tern : all about the ride
brakemeister is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 09:14 AM   #11
Grishnak
Senior Member
 
Grishnak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: West Sussex UK
Bikes: Steel Tourer,Recumbent SWB,Steel Road,Flying pigeon with SA 3speed,Raliegh Twentys,Raliegh U.S Cruiser.
Posts: 259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
+ 1 dérailleur,though my folders are all hub gear,and thankfully have lasted a long time.50,000miles on the shimano 7 speed,I bet it goes up the pictures now i have typed this ;-).
Grishnak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 10:11 AM   #12
LWaB
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Auld Blighty
Bikes: Early Cannondale tandem, '99 S&S Frezoni Audax, '65 Moulton Stowaway, '52 Claud Butler, TSR30, Brompton
Posts: 2,240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hub +1
LWaB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 10:50 AM   #13
Dynocoaster
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Pacific Northwest
Bikes: Too many....................
Posts: 3,074
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hub
Dynocoaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 12:49 PM   #14
chucky
It's got electrolytes!
 
chucky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Bikes: Self-designed carbon fiber highracer, BikesDirect Kilo WT5, Pacific Cycles Carryme, Dahon Boardwalk with custom Sturmey Archer wheelset
Posts: 1,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Obviously all of you who voted derailleur are a bunch of ignorant ninnies because derailleurs clearly aren't even worthy of consideration. The most likely cause of your confusion is that you perpetuate the sins of derailleur equipped bikes in all your cycling endeavours rather than allowing the glory of internal hubs to set you free. For example:
1. Dished wheels built to accommodate derailleurs are weak and difficult to build. As a result they're typically way overbuilt and give the impression that the simple task of wheelbuilding is not suited to the average cyclist. Since the undished wheels of internal hubs are inherently stronger you have the choice of either dropping weight with fewer spokes and lighter rims or considerably increasing the wheel strength by maintaining the same specification as a dished derailleur wheel. If you think IGHs wheels are heavier then you can only blame yourself for not building them according to your preferences and if you don't think building a wheel is easy then you can only blame your derailleur cassette for making it difficult.
2. On the topic of repair I would argue that a derailleur cannot be repaired by the average cyclist or in fact anyone at all because they simply aren't capable of working. What is so special about a derailleur system that it is considered functioning when cannot ever work after being scrubbed clean? How would you feel if you bought a new television which only worked when slathered in oil or covered in mud? Would you consider it functional or broken? At least IGHs can be fixed by someone as opposed to derailleurs which are in an eternal state of disrepair literally glued together with rotting carcases. IGH can be used as you need to use them, but deraileurs put the cart before the horse and need to be used according to their own fickle requirements.
3. Also internal hubs allow one to independently tune drivetrain efficiency whereas the efficiency of derailleur setups depend heavily on factors which cannot be optimized. For example, it is well known that things like chainline and cog sizes are some of the most important parameters affecting drivetrain efficiency (particularly cog sizes for small wheels). However, since these are the very parameters which a derailleur manipulates in order to affect mechanical advantage, the very use of a derailleur makes it impossible to have an all else equal comparison with equal chainline, cog sizes, etc. Consequently, like the wheel advantages above, since most derailleur users are accustomed to this derailleur limitation they leave these advantages unclaimed and unappreciated when they ride IGHs.
4. Expense: let's face it deraileurs require the entire gear system to be replaced every so often and cassettes aren't cheap. On the other hand IGHs need only have two sprockets replaced which represents a considerable savings.
5. Fixing flats. I don't know how derailleur equipped bikes got a reputation for being easier to fix flats, but I think it's decidedly easier with an IGH. The tangled web of spring loaded chain that you need to wrestle the wheel away from with a derailleur is a real chore.
6. Derailleurs take up more space all along the bike. This means there will be conflict whenever anything else tries to occupy that space like debris being kicked up, your clothing flapping in the breeze, or even just nice smooth aerodynamic air flow.

A few other points of clarification are:
-Shifting when stationary is exactly what you need for effectively moving on to the next thing while track standing. When riding in traffic the need to shift comes almost exclusively in response to sudden changes in conditions around you. In such cases predicting what gear you will need next or whether you will need to stop, track stand, or hammer is impossible and the planning required to effectively derail yourself into the right gear is futile and a dangerous distraction if you attempt it.
-I think fixed gear or single speed votes should count for hub gear. After all a single speed is simply a hub gear with one gear and shares all the aforementioned advantages of other hub gears.

Adding up Dynocoaster and me (and counting fixie for internal):
derailleur 6 igh 6
chucky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 12:52 PM   #15
ShinyBiker
Pedaling fool
 
ShinyBiker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Arlington, VA
Bikes: 07 Schwinn Voyageur GSD, Next Avalon, 2007 Dahon Yeah
Posts: 763
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
IGH

Derailleurs make sense if you ride for long distances without stopping. However, for a city rider like me, IGH make perfect sense.

I quoteth the late Sheldon Brown:

Internal-gear hubs are more reliable than derailer systems, and require much less maintenance. The step-up ratios of their top gears make oversize chainrings unnecessary on small-wheel folding bicycles. Unlike derailers, internal hubs shift even at a stop, very nice in stop-and-go urban traffic.

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/internal-gears.html
ShinyBiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 01:03 PM   #16
nekohime
I... Don't care.
 
nekohime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sunny SoCal
Bikes:
Posts: 1,279
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hub. I like being able to shift down when I'm stopped. At the speeds I'm going who cares about decreased efficiency or increased weight or whatever? The 20lbs of groceries don't care. Also. I hate cleaning derailleurs. It is the epitome of suckity suck for me.
__________________
Wanna join my charity folding bike ride? Sign-up here!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way :p
nekohime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 01:04 PM   #17
SesameCrunch
Eschew Obfuscation
 
SesameCrunch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Bikes: 2005 Fuji Professional, 2002 Lemond Zurich, Folders - Strida, Merc, Dahon, Downtube, Recumbent folder
Posts: 3,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chucky View Post
Obviously all of you who voted derailleur are a bunch of ignorant ninnies because derailleurs clearly aren't even worthy of consideration. The most likely cause of your confusion is that you perpetuate the sins of derailleur equipped bikes in all your cycling endeavours rather than allowing the glory of internal hubs to set you free. For example:
1. Dished wheels built to accommodate derailleurs are weak and difficult to build. As a result they're typically way overbuilt and give the impression that the simple task of wheelbuilding is not suited to the average cyclist. Since the undished wheels of internal hubs are inherently stronger you have the choice of either dropping weight with fewer spokes and lighter rims or considerably increasing the wheel strength by maintaining the same specification as a dished derailleur wheel. If you think IGHs wheels are heavier then you can only blame yourself for not building them according to your preferences and if you don't think building a wheel is easy then you can only blame your derailleur cassette for making it difficult.
2. On the topic of repair I would argue that a derailleur cannot be repaired by the average cyclist or in fact anyone at all because they simply aren't capable of working. What is so special about a derailleur system that it is considered functioning when cannot ever work after being scrubbed clean? How would you feel if you bought a new television which only worked when slathered in oil or covered in mud? Would you consider it functional or broken? At least IGHs can be fixed by someone as opposed to derailleurs which are in an eternal state of disrepair literally glued together with rotting carcases. IGH can be used as you need to use them, but deraileurs put the cart before the horse and need to be used according to their own fickle requirements.
3. Also internal hubs allow one to independently tune drivetrain efficiency whereas the efficiency of derailleur setups depend heavily on factors which cannot be optimized. For example, it is well known that things like chainline and cog sizes are some of the most important parameters affecting drivetrain efficiency (particularly cog sizes for small wheels). However, since these are the very parameters which a derailleur manipulates in order to affect mechanical advantage, the very use of a derailleur makes it impossible to have an all else equal comparison with equal chainline, cog sizes, etc. Consequently, like the wheel advantages above, since most derailleur users are accustomed to this derailleur limitation they leave these advantages unclaimed and unappreciated when they ride IGHs.
4. Expense: let's face it deraileurs require the entire gear system to be replaced every so often and cassettes aren't cheap. On the other hand IGHs need only have two sprockets replaced which represents a considerable savings.
5. Fixing flats. I don't know how derailleur equipped bikes got a reputation for being easier to fix flats, but I think it's decidedly easier with an IGH. The tangled web of spring loaded chain that you need to wrestle the wheel away from with a derailleur is a real chore.
6. Derailleurs take up more space all along the bike. This means there will be conflict whenever anything else tries to occupy that space like debris being kicked up, your clothing flapping in the breeze, or even just nice smooth aerodynamic air flow.

A few other points of clarification are:
-Shifting when stationary is exactly what you need for effectively moving on to the next thing while track standing. When riding in traffic the need to shift comes almost exclusively in response to sudden changes in conditions around you. In such cases predicting what gear you will need next or whether you will need to stop, track stand, or hammer is impossible and the planning required to effectively derail yourself into the right gear is futile and a dangerous distraction if you attempt it.
-I think fixed gear or single speed votes should count for hub gear. After all a single speed is simply a hub gear with one gear and shares all the aforementioned advantages of other hub gears.

Adding up Dynocoaster and me (and counting fixie for internal):
derailleur 6 igh 6

Wow, are you always this inhibited?
__________________
SesameCrunch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 01:06 PM   #18
SesameCrunch
Eschew Obfuscation
 
SesameCrunch's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Bikes: 2005 Fuji Professional, 2002 Lemond Zurich, Folders - Strida, Merc, Dahon, Downtube, Recumbent folder
Posts: 3,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nekohime View Post
Hub. I like being able to shift down when I'm stopped. At the speeds I'm going who cares about decreased efficiency or increased weight or whatever? The 20lbs of groceries don't care. Also. I hate cleaning derailleurs. It is the epitome of suckity suck for me.
Now, this here is a compelling argument!
__________________
SesameCrunch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 01:11 PM   #19
nekohime
I... Don't care.
 
nekohime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sunny SoCal
Bikes:
Posts: 1,279
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by SesameCrunch View Post

Now, this here is a compelling argument!
Seriously, I think this is one of the big reasons why my mixte with derailleur system sits in the garage, being all pretty. I cannot stand to get the drivetrain dirty and decreasing the prettiness of this bike, and it's too much of a pain to clean off.
__________________
Wanna join my charity folding bike ride? Sign-up here!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way :p
nekohime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 01:17 PM   #20
stevegor
Senior Member
 
stevegor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Oz
Bikes: lots... even a Raleigh twenty !!!
Posts: 2,117
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow, people are actually passionate about hub gears, they are catching up in this vote.

I know one of my plethora of multiple personalities likes them, but I won't let him vote
...... the other ten vote for DERAILLEUR.
stevegor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 02:05 PM   #21
nekohime
I... Don't care.
 
nekohime's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sunny SoCal
Bikes:
Posts: 1,279
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, also, I happily admit to being Satan.
__________________
Wanna join my charity folding bike ride? Sign-up here!
Quote:
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way :p
nekohime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 02:40 PM   #22
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin
Posts: 12,258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I like drop bars.
that pretty much forces me to use derailer systems.
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm
AEO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 03:18 PM   #23
Sammyboy
The Legitimiser
 
Sammyboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Southampton, UK
Bikes: Gazelle Trim Trophy, EG Bates Track Bike, HR Bates Cantiflex bike, Nigel Dean fixed gear conversion, Raleigh Royal, Falcon Westminster.
Posts: 4,846
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AEO View Post
I like drop bars.
that pretty much forces me to use derailer systems.
Nope!



Other ways of mounting also exist (there's a thing that screws into the end of your drop bars, there's a regular bar end shifter, you can mount a bar-end extension on the stem, you could mount it on one of those extra stand-off bars people mount their endless GPSes and speedos on).
Sammyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 04:00 PM   #24
bhkyte
Senior Member
 
bhkyte's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: York UK
Bikes: 2X dualdrive Mezzo folder,plus others
Posts: 2,869
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 39 Post(s)
Dual drive=1. Sitting on the fence because I like the sensation !
Please register my vote snafu.
Thankyou.
bhkyte is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-10, 04:23 PM   #25
feijai
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes:
Posts: 907
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chucky View Post
1. Dished wheels built to accommodate derailleurs are weak and difficult to build.
And no shop knows how to build them! Every shop, on the other hand, can build hub gears without a problem.

Quote:
2. On the topic of repair I would argue that a derailleur cannot be repaired by the average cyclist or in fact anyone at all because they simply aren't capable of working.
Absolutely. People with derailleurs are actually not moving at all. It's ALL A HOAX. "These aren't the derailleurs you're looking for."

Quote:
3. Also internal hubs allow one to independently tune drivetrain efficiency whereas the efficiency of derailleur setups depend heavily on factors which cannot be optimized.
Very true. Hubs let you tune your efficiency to all sorts of different levels, all of which are less efficient than the standard non-tunable one for derailleurs!

Quote:
4. Expense: let's face it deraileurs require the entire gear system to be replaced every so often and cassettes aren't cheap. On the other hand IGHs need only have two sprockets replaced which represents a considerable savings.
A bargain! For example: for the cost of one Rohlhoff Speedhub 500/1 XC, you can buy a mere 31 SRAM PG-970 cassettes. After you've exhausted them, you'll be sorry you didn't buy that Speedhub.

Quote:
5. Fixing flats. I don't know how derailleur equipped bikes got a reputation for being easier to fix flats, but I think it's decidedly easier with an IGH. The tangled web of spring loaded chain that you need to wrestle the wheel away from with a derailleur is a real chore.
Plus quick-release axles are overrated. Give me a good wrench any day.

Quote:
6. Derailleurs take up more space all along the bike. This means there will be conflict whenever anything else tries to occupy that space like debris being kicked up, your clothing flapping in the breeze, or even just nice smooth aerodynamic air flow.
Plus the derailleur takes up the valuable space I need to install my chain tensioner.
feijai is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:10 AM.