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Old 03-22-12, 06:20 PM   #1
keke
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1st ride and bicycle pumps....

Brought my bike out of hibernation and rode for the first time in several months - as a cycling newbie I cannot imagine riding in the freezing cold and snow!

It was nice, riding along and enjoying the fun of 2 wheels. Didn't take long to get into the swing (?spin) of things, enjoyed it immensely.

Alas, a more experienced rider I encountered said to me: "your tyres are flat, mate" I had absolutely no idea!

With embarrassment I realised that I don't even have a bicylce pump! It took a stranger advising me to pump my tyres for me to realise.

So lads and ladettes, what recommendations have ye all for me regarding bicycle pumps. One of the mini variety that I can carry around me when tootling along on my folder.

Very many thanks!
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Old 03-22-12, 07:18 PM   #2
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I definately recommend a small pump that you can carry along with you. It may not be the easiest to use, but will be there when you need it.
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Old 03-22-12, 07:30 PM   #3
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^^Thanks Pinigis, any particular recommendations? Any reliable brand/model? I was wondering how useful it is to have a pump with a guage?
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Old 03-22-12, 07:33 PM   #4
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I recommend Topeak Race Rocket HP. Get it on ebay.
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Old 03-22-12, 07:43 PM   #5
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Thanks Jur. Do you have any experience with guage bearing pumps? Is it necessary? How possible is it to overinflate your bike tyre and what are the consequences?
Danke!
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Old 03-22-12, 08:04 PM   #6
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If you can get a pump with a small gauge, great; but my experience shows that it is not really necessary, assuming you have a floor pump at home with a gauge. So my pump for the road does not have a gauge, I gauge it by squeezing and comparing with the other tyre. That's good enough to get me home and if necessary change the pressure with the floor pump. The road pump is very small and can do both types of valve and has a air tube to protect the valve during pumping. Just drop it in a pocket. There is a MTB version too, which will do lower pressure.

With the hp pump I recommended it is possible to burst a tyre if you have wide tyres. It can go to 160psi easily but it will take you a lot of strokes to get there. You will probably get tired of pumping before that happens. If you have old cracked wide tyres, then there is a real possibility to explode the tyre.
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Old 03-22-12, 08:19 PM   #7
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I only use a gauge at home, if I'm putting some air in the tires while on the road a simple "squeeze check" will suffice.

On a side note, riding in the winter is fun, all it takes is a little preparation. I did it for the first time this winter and really enjoyed it, and I found out there is a sub-culture of winter cyclists in most cities. I wouldn't want to do it on a folding bike though, the tire sizes on most folders aren't good for winter conditions, and the potential to get rust on the components or frame may be a greater risk for a folding bike as compared to the traditional bikes.
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Old 03-23-12, 02:52 AM   #8
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As has been said, you dont need a gauge on a pump to carry with you for emergencies, but having access to a pump with a gauge is a good idea; the first time i rode a bike with the tyres pumped up to the correct pressure was a revelation, in terms of value for money improvements, getting a reasonably accurate gauge (and using it) is up at the top of the list.
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Old 03-23-12, 03:07 AM   #9
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What's the max pressure of your tyres? It's written on the sidewalls.

High pressure tyres, over about 60 psi tax the arm muscles; larger foot actuated pumps help. Medium pressure tyres (about 40 psi) can be inflated with almost anything. The physics are that fatter pumps with a longer stroke pump more air, taking less strokes to get the beasties up to pressure and reducing arm-ache. Small-tube pumps with sharp handles hurt the hand, as more strokes are needed and the sharp bit digs into the paw.

I have a ten year old Topeak still running. It's a small MTB pump with an illegible guage.

My road bike, and the Mezzo run 110 psi, I use a cheap electric car pump to get the blighters up to pressure, then take the Topeak to deal with flats. I use the car pump more than the others.

Re pressures; I'm of the single opinion that pumping the tyres up to the max sidewall pressure reduces punctures. I have no scientific evidence to back this up.

I also have a CO2 pump on the MTB, when you run out of CO2 cartridges you run out of bicyling, but that and a spare tube save the faff of silly sticky patches, misplaced beliefs in the properties of modern adhesives, and spit.

I haven't had a puncture for a couple of years now. It cannot last.

Last edited by snafu21; 03-23-12 at 03:22 AM.
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Old 03-23-12, 09:01 AM   #10
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Thanks all. My tyre (Kenda) says: min 40 - max 65psi

I don't have a home/floor pump. I was wondering if a single mini pump would suffice as I don't ride that frequently yet. Seems like Topeak is the brand most trust. Snafu, yours has lasted 10 years, wow!
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Old 03-23-12, 09:17 AM   #11
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Do you know if you have presta or schrader valves on your tires? I have schrader currently and have a topeak mountain morph (it can do presta with some adjustments, or you can get the road morph which comes set up for presta). Don't know if that'll fit on your folder or if it's too big, but I like that it has a gauge and a foot peg that folds out so you can pump it as if it were a normal floor pump. Also having a hose is a nice thing. I wouldn't recommend (or any frame/mini pump) as your only pump (floor pumps at home are a good idea), but it's better than some smaller ones if you choose to only have one pump.
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Old 03-23-12, 06:13 PM   #12
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I am a fan of the Lezyne pumps. The guages work very well and they are a quality pump. At home almost any large pump with a guage will work.
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Old 03-24-12, 01:45 AM   #13
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Quote:
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Thanks all. My tyre (Kenda) says: min 40 - max 65psi

I don't have a home/floor pump. I was wondering if a single mini pump would suffice as I don't ride that frequently yet. Seems like Topeak is the brand most trust. Snafu, yours has lasted 10 years, wow!
Yes, you can get by fine with a mini pump, (with a rounded end on the handle.) If your tyres are 40-60 psi, then your tubes are probably (but not always) fitted with Schrader (car type) valves.

I can get about 40 psi out of my Topeak, before my arm muscles start to complain. When you do more cycling, you can upgrade later, then you already have a portable pump for the flats you won't get if you keep the pressures up.

:-)
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Old 03-27-12, 07:01 AM   #14
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A lot of bikers that do a lot of touring like the Toppeak Road Morph G pump. A less common but also popular model is the Lezyne Micro Floor Drive with gauge. I have both. I would not want to rely on these small portables for my sole pump at home, but I think they are the best ones to carry on a bike.
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Old 03-27-12, 12:09 PM   #15
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Thanks guys. Appreciate all the suggestions.
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Old 03-30-12, 10:23 AM   #16
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Update...

Ended up buying a footpump for the short term cos I was tired of just watching the poor bike whilst I made up my mind about a mini pump.

Not sure how accurate these guages are but when I pumped up the tyres to 40psi, I thought they were going to explode! So hard and stiff, I had to stop at that, my liver couldn't handle it!

Rode today and I felt the difference. Might try to go for 55psi or so to see how it feels.

I'm slowly coming to the conclusion that this folder is possibly not the right fit for me. My legs are long and I'm already at the seatpost limit but still my feet not working right with the pedals. Uncomfortable and inefficient.

On a positive note, now riding in a straighter line (not ready for the open road yet) and cornering/taking bends much better. Roll on the summer!
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Old 03-30-12, 11:12 AM   #17
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Ended up buying a footpump for the short term cos I was tired of just watching the poor bike whilst I made up my mind about a mini pump.

Not sure how accurate these guages are but when I pumped up the tyres to 40psi, I thought they were going to explode! So hard and stiff, I had to stop at that, my liver couldn't handle it!

Rode today and I felt the difference. Might try to go for 55psi or so to see how it feels.

I'm slowly coming to the conclusion that this folder is possibly not the right fit for me. My legs are long and I'm already at the seatpost limit but still my feet not working right with the pedals. Uncomfortable and inefficient.

On a positive note, now riding in a straighter line (not ready for the open road yet) and cornering/taking bends much better. Roll on the summer!
what bike you have ? We do have extra long seatposts for the 33.9 ( 34mm) seatposts for Dahons Terns and many others
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Old 03-31-12, 01:29 AM   #18
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what bike you have ? We do have extra long seatposts for the 33.9 ( 34mm) seatposts for Dahons Terns and many others
Hi Thor, my bike is a Pinnacle Journey 1.0
From what I have gathered, it's not a Dahon clone. It has Oyama hinges. When I tried to find a handlepost, the Dahon part wouldn't fit.

Might just suffer it and then buy another when a good (cheap) deal comes along.

When I visit the US, might buy if I can get something that costs less than my personal duty-free allowance (UK)
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Old 03-31-12, 06:27 AM   #19
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Keke, you might gain a centimetre leg length by tilting the saddle forward a tad if possible. After that, Gel saddles are reasonably cheap and can add up to a couple of centimetres in their rail and padding height.

It's a 34mm post, as far as I know, and more longerer ones from Dahon dealers should fit.

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Old 03-31-12, 12:06 PM   #20
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Thanks snafu, will check my seatpost diameter. Last time I presumed a part would fit, I was wrong. When you say tilt the saddle forward how does that give more leg room?
BTW, do you think bikes here are much more expensive?
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Old 03-31-12, 12:15 PM   #21
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"BTW, do you think bikes here are much more expensive?"

Where? UK? Everything is more expensive here. 20% VAT does not help.

Re: saddle tilt, it depends on, um, which bits of your anatomy are supporting your ,er, body. A slight tilt forward on the rear of the saddle can support the 'sit-bones' instead of the perineum, and also give a little more height. Given that it's taken me ten years to find saddles that fit, don't be too worried if I'm talking out of my seat-post.
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Old 03-31-12, 02:19 PM   #22
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Thudbuster makes a 610mm long suspension seatpost for folders in 33.9mm diameter - also a 560mm. I have a thudbuster on my mountain bike and my Raleigh Twenty. They are expensive but(butt) worth every penny.
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