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-   -   Greenzone vs others (http://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bikes/833089-greenzone-vs-others.html)

LDB 07-17-12 05:19 PM

Greenzone vs others
 
Looking at the Greenzone website the bikes look pretty good but then that's what websites are supposed to do. I'm sure a $600 Tern is a better bike than a $300 Greenzone but could those with knowledge of them comment on comparison of the two? Thanks.

Jude 09-10-12 01:34 PM

Just found your thread by searching since I'm looking at a Greenzone bike on craigslist right now. Basically, the $300 model from Greenzone (currently on sale for 200 by the way) is made of pretty low-end steel and has absolute bottom of the barrel components. It weighs a ton, which will make you unhappy on hills, and the reliability of the parts is likely to cause you headaches. Derailer going out of tune constantly, brakes doing the same and generally underperforming, wheels always out of true, that kinda thing.

That said, I'm pretty inclined to pick up the one I'm looking at if I can get the guy down to about $100, because I just want it for a beater/commuter bike for riding around the city so I don't have to leave my nicer bike locked outside exposed to the elements, thieves and vandals. If all you're doing is cruising around town (especially a relatively flat city like where I live) it might be a good investment.

Dynocoaster 09-10-12 02:38 PM

The Tern Link D8 is an 8 speed. 26.7 lbs. Aluminium
Green Zone is a 7 speed 32 lbs. hi tensile steel

The Tern has nicer components and tires.

Pinigis 09-10-12 04:29 PM

At $300 you don't have to settle for a heavy steel bike; the Origami Crane is aluminum and only 25 lbs (26.6lbs with rack and fender which are included in the base price).

BassNotBass 09-10-12 08:35 PM

Rarely are posted specs accurate nor is an aluminum frame necessarily better than steel. There are just so many variables involved that 'paper' comparisons are moot. I have yet to evaluate a Tern or the Greenzone bikes so I have no valid input there but what I can tell you from experience is that cheap isn't necessarily 'crap', what works for most doesn't mean it will work for you and rave reviews can be written by the ignorant who paid for a particular bike with their own money in which case the more money they spent, the more apt they are to convince others that they made a wise choice.

My advice is to heed the input from individuals who have a good reputation for being knowledgeable. <catch22/>

jur 09-11-12 01:25 AM

"High-tensile" is code for heavy, thick-walled tubing. It is the worst for frame materials except maybe mild steel. Oh hang on, lead is worse again.

Manufacturing in China has long ago progressed to good quality welding a routine thing in aluminium. So it is a no-brainer that a cheap Chinese origin aluminium bike is going to be better than a cheap Chinese origin high-tensile steel bike.

It is also a no-brainer to choose the Origami which has been well supported here by the business owner. I would regard those bikes as inexpensive not cheap.

Be warned - buying an inexpensive folding bike is the first manifested symptom of the almost incurable folderitis which leads to uncontrollable folder-buying.

tcs 09-11-12 06:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jur (Post 14715504)
"High-tensile" is code for heavy, thick-walled tubing. It is the worst for frame materials except maybe mild steel.

Uh, what are Brompton frames made from?

kamtsa 09-11-12 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcs (Post 14715899)
Uh, what are Brompton frames made from?

"high tensile steel alloys"

http://www.brompton.co.uk/page.asp?p=3088

fietsbob 09-11-12 11:28 AM

Tube wall thickness and diameter influences the weight and strength.

and durability..

If you really want to know what a steel alloy is , take a number .
4130 is specific, and different from 4150, for example.

OP wanted a cheap bike that was not a thief magnet.. that one probably qualifies.

I wonder how many of he companies import the same bike,
just specifying their name be painted on it.

jur 09-11-12 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tcs (Post 14715899)
Uh, what are Brompton frames made from?

High tensile steel wise guy. It still remains the bottom of the list for frame materials.

BassNotBass 09-11-12 07:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jur (Post 14719497)
High tensile steel wise guy. It still remains the bottom of the list for frame materials.

That depends on your list.

Pinigis 09-12-12 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jur (Post 14719497)
High tensile steel wise guy. It still remains the bottom of the list for frame materials.

The choice of materials is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. The properties of each alloy (yes, every variety of steel is alloy of iron, carbon, chromium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and other elements) depend upon the makeup, the processing, strain hardening, heat treatments, etc. The material's malleability, toughness, tensile strength, and other material properties are considered when determining the "best" options for a design.

Carbon nano-tubes are incredible, but trying to make a bike that will sell for under $10,000, they are impractical. Steel is great choice for a tough frame with enough ductility to absorb impacts without deformation or cracking. Aluminum has great rigidity and an impressive tensile strength to weight ratio.

There is room in the market for a variety of materials.

Sorry for the diatribe, but I am one of those engineers that actually loved Mechanics of Materials classes.

Ozonation 09-12-12 10:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pinigis (Post 14721830)
The choice of materials is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. The properties of each alloy (yes, every variety of steel is alloy of iron, carbon, chromium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and other elements) depend upon the makeup, the processing, strain hardening, heat treatments, etc. The material's malleability, toughness, tensile strength, and other material properties are considered when determining the "best" options for a design.

Carbon nano-tubes are incredible, but trying to make a bike that will sell for under $10,000, they are impractical. Steel is great choice for a tough frame with enough ductility to absorb impacts without deformation or cracking. Aluminum has great rigidity and an impressive tensile strength to weight ratio.

There is room in the market for a variety of materials.

Sorry for the diatribe, but I am one of those engineers that actually loved Mechanics of Materials classes.

LOL... we're moving offices to a new building, and I was just packing up some mechanics textbooks just now. Nothing like twisting a steel rod 30 or 40 times until it broke! :thumb:

jur 09-12-12 05:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pinigis (Post 14721830)
The choice of materials is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. The properties of each alloy (yes, every variety of steel is alloy of iron, carbon, chromium, magnesium, manganese, nickel, and other elements) depend upon the makeup, the processing, strain hardening, heat treatments, etc. The material's malleability, toughness, tensile strength, and other material properties are considered when determining the "best" options for a design.

Yes but AFAIK there still isn't anything lower on the list of choice for bike frame materials.

Dynocoaster 09-12-12 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jur (Post 14723725)
Yes but AFAIK there still isn't anything lower on the list of choice for bike frame materials.

Wood?

himespau 09-12-12 07:20 PM

Carbon Steel?

BassNotBass 09-12-12 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dynocoaster (Post 14723970)
Wood?

Quote:

Originally Posted by himespau (Post 14724042)
Carbon Steel?

I think even bamboo supplants carbon steel.

BassNotBass 09-12-12 07:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jur (Post 14723725)
Yes but AFAIK there still isn't anything lower on the list of choice for bike frame materials.

It depends on the bike's purpose and the preference of the user. As far as I'm concerned 'carbon' frames are at the bottom of my list. Aluminum (aluminium) is next then titanium with steel alloys being my favorite. But then I'm an old utilitarian type (non-weight weenie carmudgeon) bike riding kinda guy. I'd choose an old EF Schwinn over a Cervelo carbon any day.

edwong3 09-12-12 08:29 PM

HUH??? You ignore the fact that they (Greenzone) sell an aluminum model that was selling for $299 until recently (Went up in price) and weighs 27 lbs. The components are not "absolute bottom of the barrel" either. Last I checked, Shimano Tourney is pretty decent. The steel model at $199 seems like a good value for what it is.

Someone who has deeper pockets, and an appreciation for higher end bikes are not a candidate to buy a Greenzone, but that does't mean it's not a legitimate competitor or that there isn't a market for them.

The OP asked for opinions from people who have knowledge of this bike.

Ed

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jude (Post 14712957)
Just found your thread by searching since I'm looking at a Greenzone bike on craigslist right now. Basically, the $300 model from Greenzone (currently on sale for 200 by the way) is made of pretty low-end steel and has absolute bottom of the barrel components. It weighs a ton, which will make you unhappy on hills, and the reliability of the parts is likely to cause you headaches. Derailer going out of tune constantly, brakes doing the same and generally underperforming, wheels always out of true, that kinda thing.

That said, I'm pretty inclined to pick up the one I'm looking at if I can get the guy down to about $100, because I just want it for a beater/commuter bike for riding around the city so I don't have to leave my nicer bike locked outside exposed to the elements, thieves and vandals. If all you're doing is cruising around town (especially a relatively flat city like where I live) it might be a good investment.



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