Bike Forums

Bike Forums (http://www.bikeforums.net/forum.php)
-   Folding Bikes (http://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bikes/)
-   -   swift folders (http://www.bikeforums.net/folding-bikes/83711-swift-folders.html)

bigbenaugust 05-10-06 03:49 PM

Definitely a 34mm seatpost. I had to do a little creative filing to make a seatpost-mount fender fit.

BruceMetras 05-10-06 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigbenaugust
So will a chain roller/tensioner as pictured above help keep the chain from jumping to the right (between the chain and the guard)? My Swift does this on occasion, and it's rather annoying.

Since I've installed the roller, the chain hasn't jumped off to either side of the chainwheel... as I have mine set up, it's not a tensioner but just a guide to keep the chain inline with the top of the chainwheel.

Bruce

Crankypants 05-10-06 04:42 PM

Would the Swift lend itself to have a Rohloff? I read how BF stopped using them because of problems with cable breakage due to the long length of the cables (although I know that there are tandems that use Rohloff). Would the cable routing on a Swift be messy (since you need the cable to run from each side of the hub) of do you think that this bike would be the ticket? So far, the only folder I have seen/ ridden with a Rohloff was Chop's exceptionally sweet Gobike. Is there anybody else out there?

yangmusa 05-10-06 05:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crankypants
Would the Swift lend itself to have a Rohloff? I read how BF stopped using them because of problems with cable breakage due to the long length of the cables (although I know that there are tandems that use Rohloff).

The Bike Fridays are prone to cables breaking anyway; not because they are long, but because the cables run at an acute angle under the bottom bracket and suffer severe stress when folded.

The Swift has much better cable routing - less acute angles and less stress when folded. If a Rohloff can successfully fit a Brompton, I don't see why it wouldn't work on a Swift...

Magnus

Dave Hickey 05-10-06 06:47 PM

Yet another Swift
 
1 Attachment(s)
Here is my latest folder. I bought the frame/fork from Peter and built it with spare parts.

I wanted a bike that I could ride in shorts and sandals and not have to worry about cycling shoes, padded shorts etc...

This bike fits the bill perfectly. It is built pretty basic. I'm running a single cog on an 8/9 speed rear hub.
The front chain ring is 52t and the rear cog is 15t...

Some of my favorite things about the Swift vs my other folders.

1. The removable stem riser is the cleanest setup I've seen on any folder. It is a very strong design yet very simple. No, you cannot fold the stem unit but it is very easy to remove if needed
2. Horizontal dropouts- A big plus for fixed and single speeds
3. Higher horizontal top tube(mono tube?). The design of the frame makes it feel more like a "big" bike than any other 20" wheeled bike I own.

I love my Bike Fridays but I'm extremely impressed with Swift....

KMG65 05-11-06 02:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by james_swift
So long as you don't plan on rolling over logs and stumps. This applies not only to the Swift, but any 406-wheeled bike. Small wheels and big obstacles (and potholes, for that matter) don't mix.

Greetings,

I'm not a Swift owner yet, but it's on my list. James, your comment above about small wheels and big obstacles brings up something I've wondered about concerning the Swift. On a bike like this, with a stem that's designed to come off, can a person safely pull up on the bars to clear a pothole, or a curb? Sounds sketchy to me.

Thanks,

Andy

Dave Hickey 05-11-06 03:07 PM

No issues with the Swift or Bike Friday stems removable stems and risers. They are held very secure.

BruceMetras 05-11-06 04:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Hickey
Here is my latest folder. I bought the frame/fork from Peter and built it with spare parts.

I wanted a bike that I could ride in shorts and sandals and not have to worry about cycling shoes, padded shorts etc...

This bike fits the bill perfectly. It is built pretty basic. I'm running a single cog on an 8/9 speed rear hub.
The front chain ring is 52t and the rear cog is 15t...

Some of my favorite things about the Swift vs my other folders.

1. The removable stem riser is the cleanest setup I've seen on any folder. It is a very strong design yet very simple. No, you cannot fold the stem unit but it is very easy to remove if needed
2. Horizontal dropouts- A big plus for fixed and single speeds
3. Higher horizontal top tube(mono tube?). The design of the frame makes it feel more like a "big" bike than any other 20" wheeled bike I own.

I love my Bike Fridays but I'm extremely impressed with Swift....


Hi Dave! I like what you have done with the Swift... looks great and should be a blast to ride.

Bruce

james_swift 05-11-06 09:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KMG65
Greetings,

I'm not a Swift owner yet, but it's on my list. James, your comment above about small wheels and big obstacles brings up something I've wondered about concerning the Swift. On a bike like this, with a stem that's designed to come off, can a person safely pull up on the bars to clear a pothole, or a curb? Sounds sketchy to me.

Thanks,

Andy

The steerer tube is threaded, so it provides a super-solid and secure grip on the stempost when it's clamped on.

I clear countless potholes and curbs on my daily commute through San Francisco with confidence that I always forget that the stempost is removeable. I have drop bars, and I constantly rock the bike out of the saddle, pulling up hard on the brake hoods with no issue. The front end is solid throughout.

james_swift 05-11-06 09:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Hickey
Here is my latest folder. I bought the frame/fork from Peter and built it with spare parts.

I wanted a bike that I could ride in shorts and sandals and not have to worry about cycling shoes, padded shorts etc...

This bike fits the bill perfectly. It is built pretty basic. I'm running a single cog on an 8/9 speed rear hub.
The front chain ring is 52t and the rear cog is 15t...

Some of my favorite things about the Swift vs my other folders.

1. The removable stem riser is the cleanest setup I've seen on any folder. It is a very strong design yet very simple. No, you cannot fold the stem unit but it is very easy to remove if needed
2. Horizontal dropouts- A big plus for fixed and single speeds
3. Higher horizontal top tube(mono tube?). The design of the frame makes it feel more like a "big" bike than any other 20" wheeled bike I own.

I love my Bike Fridays but I'm extremely impressed with Swift....

There's a definite theme going on with Dave's bikes. A very fitting addition to your collection. Excellent work.

Dave Hickey 05-12-06 05:48 AM

Yeah...There is a theme... Most of my bikes are black with either yellow or red saddles, cables and bar tape:)

James, I bought this frame partially based on your excellent reviews... I can tell you that you've been spot on regarding the Swift...It is an outstanding bike.

amitkulz 05-12-06 06:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Hickey
Yeah...There is a theme... Most of my bikes are black with either yellow or red saddles, cables and bar tape:)

James, I bought this frame partially based on your excellent reviews... I can tell you that you've been spot on regarding the Swift...It is an outstanding bike.

Now if only the Swift came in a Brompton like fold! I would buy it immediately.

james_swift 05-12-06 07:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Hickey
Yeah...There is a theme... Most of my bikes are black with either yellow or red saddles, cables and bar tape:)

James, I bought this frame partially based on your excellent reviews... I can tell you that you've been spot on regarding the Swift...It is an outstanding bike.

Glad to hear.

Where do you get your custom Livestrong paint jobs?

Dave Hickey 05-12-06 07:32 AM

I had the logos made up. Peter had the frame powdercoated black.... I'm a 13 year cancer survivor so LiveStrong has a special meaning for me....

james_swift 05-12-06 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dave Hickey
I'm a 13 year cancer survivor so LiveStrong has a special meaning for me....

That's incredible, Dave. LiveLong and FoldStrong. :)

KMG65 05-12-06 09:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by james_swift
The steerer tube is threaded, so it provides a super-solid and secure grip on the stempost when it's clamped on.

I clear countless potholes and curbs on my daily commute through San Francisco with confidence that I always forget that the stempost is removeable. I have drop bars, and I constantly rock the bike out of the saddle, pulling up hard on the brake hoods with no issue. The front end is solid throughout.

That's what I wanted to hear! Thanks James, and thanks Dave. If it survives San Francisco, it'll survive Santa Cruz. Now I just have to find the money ........ :)

-- Andy

james_swift 05-13-06 03:57 PM

It's maintenance time again for my Swift. :)

1400+ miles and the bottom bracket is showing some excessive play. What's with these new-fangled, non-adjustable disposable cartridge bottom brackets? What happened to the adjustable bottom bracket cups w/replaceable loose bearings? Think about the environment man! All those bottom brackets clogging our landfills! ;)

Ok, so it's been over 7 years between my last bike and my Swift. Things have changed, so I see. I ordered a Shimano UN53 68x107 bottom bracket from Nashbar.

Also worn after 8 months of repeated folding and unfolding, the seatpost quick-release binder bolts. My seatpost has been slipping recently, regardless of how tight I clamped-down the QR's. I borrowed the QR from the stempost and installed it at the top stempost binder. No more seatpost slip. Upon closer inspection, my seatpost QR's are bent in an arc, probably due to normal wear and excessive tightening (my bad). I ordered a replacement set of 45mm QR seatpost binder bolts from Nashbar.

~700 miles: my chain had gotten a bit slack. Had my chaintug failed and allowed the rear axle to slide forward a bit in the dropout? Upon closer inspection, the chain had stretched approx 1/16" past the 12" mark on my steel ruler. I hope I haven't killed my expensive single-speed cog! The SRAM PC-68 chain only lasted 4 months, which is somewhat understandable given the abuse of single-speed use. I ordered a KMC chain from Nashbar. Curious to see if the KMC is more durable (they make motorycle drive chains, as well as timing chains for auto engines).

Will post pictures and findings as soon as I get the goods.

progre-ss 05-13-06 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by james_swift
I ordered a KMC chain from Nashbar. Curious to see if the KMC is more durable (they make motorycle drive chains, as well as timing chains for auto engines).

I use a KMC BMX chain I purchased at Walmart on my fixie. Haven't had a problem with it yet! I'm sure yours will be the same.

maunakea 05-14-06 01:02 AM

I've used the Nashbar/KMC 9 speed chain on Dura-Ace 9 speed gruppo. I have no experience with BMX chains other than the stock chains on Dahon and DT. The NB/KMC 9 speed chain works just as well as the Dura-Ace and SRAM 990 chain (haven't used the hollow-pin version of either, though), plus, unlike the Dura-Ace, but like SRAM, you get a master link. It seems the Nashbar/KMC chain takes more torque on the chain breaker to pop the pin, and the pins are larger diameter and flush. I think it would be harder to "restore" links if you cut the Nashbar/KMC chain too short. The NB/KMC chain may be a few grams heavier. Having said that, if the SRAM 9 speed chain is within a few dollars of the NB/KMC chain, I buy the SRAM because I like the SRAM master link better.

Tazman 05-14-06 01:14 AM

I have a Wipperman stainless on mine. It should last a pretty long time. Not cheap but worth the money.

Crankypants 05-19-06 05:40 AM

@Wavshrdr: Can you post your pics of your green Swift with a link or something other than the thumbnails (perhaps the same way JAmes did) because I can't open them, and I really want to check out your rig! Thanks!

TomSwifty 05-19-06 07:39 AM

Replacement grips for Xootr Swift?
 
I have a (mostly) stock Xootr Swift with the standard SRAM twist-shifter and grips. The grips are too hard and too small. Has anyone replaced their grips with a more comfortable set? If so, what were they and where did you get them?

On another note, is there a quick-release rack that will fit the 34mm seat post, perhaps with some modifications? The 34mm post diameter is too big for most common QR racks. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Tom

rdh 05-20-06 05:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TomSwifty
On another note, is there a quick-release rack that will fit the 34mm seat post, perhaps with some modifications? The 34mm post diameter is too big for most common QR racks. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
Tom

Dahon has a QR rack that fits a 34 mm seatpost. You can get one here. It also comes with supports if you want to use panniers and greater stability for larger loads, but those are not necessary. I have one and I use the supports for a pannier and like it a lot.

flyhi46c 05-23-06 07:50 AM

Swift (Xootr) alignment problem
 
I replaced my 11-28 with a SRAM 11-32 the other day. While reinstalling the rear wheel, I noticed that even when the wheel is pushed as far as it will go into the drop outs, that the rear wheel is not perfectly aligned with the seat tube. It is slightly cocked. I corrected this by pulling the wheel out of the right dropout by about 1/4 inch and retightening.

I called Xootr just now and they told me that I was not the first customer to notice this, and that the owner considers this a 'cosmetic' issue. They said it should not affect the handling if the wheel is slightly off.

Am I being extra 'fussy', or is it normal to have to readjust the rear wheel in the drop outs to get it aligned? Do any other Xootr owners have to do the same? (The brakes had to be readjusted as well).

thanks for your feedback, Arthur,

james_swift 05-23-06 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flyhi46c
I replaced my 11-28 with a SRAM 11-32 the other day. While reinstalling the rear wheel, I noticed that even when the wheel is pushed as far as it will go into the drop outs, that the rear wheel is not perfectly aligned with the seat tube. It is slightly cocked. I corrected this by pulling the wheel out of the right dropout by about 1/4 inch and retightening.

I called Xootr just now and they told me that I was not the first customer to notice this, and that the owner considers this a 'cosmetic' issue. They said it should not affect the handling if the wheel is slightly off.

Am I being extra 'fussy', or is it normal to have to readjust the rear wheel in the drop outs to get it aligned? Do any other Xootr owners have to do the same? (The brakes had to be readjusted as well).

thanks for your feedback, Arthur,

I noticed the same thing with my stock rear wheel. I ordered a custom single-speed wheel w/solid axle from Peter@Design Mobility, and the wheel aligned perfectly between the chainstays. So I'm guessing the issue is not with the rear triangle, but maybe with the spacing of the rear hub and/or the dish of the rim.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:31 AM.