Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-04-08, 05:31 PM   #1626
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Braithwait View Post
It's my favourite bike by far and is always first choice when the open road calls but there is a limit to what you may expect of it - even with all kinds of mods.
Yeah... but I think I actually have the mods more or less where I need them. Once I have grippier pedals and wider handlebars, I think I'm done. (Yes, I know, famous last words.)

If it weren't for that one *&$@%!!! hill, the stock model would have been so close to what I needed...
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-08, 05:43 PM   #1627
Paul Braithwait
Senior Member
 
Paul Braithwait's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Carlisle, in England's Lake District, just a few miles south of the border with Scotland.
Bikes: A Bianchi C2C road bike, a steel framed touring bike and a Xootr Swift folder which has made the rest redundant!
Posts: 276
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I know what you mean. I think my Swift is just the way I want it ..and then......
Paul Braithwait is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-08, 06:00 PM   #1628
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
No, really. Handlebars and pedals, and then I'm done. Really. I mean it.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-08, 01:57 AM   #1629
bendembroski
My legs hurt
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Farther behind you than I'd like to be
Bikes: Vaya, Brompton, '73 Schwinn Super Sport, Cresswell Fold-it, '81 Trek 610
Posts: 683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Braithwait View Post
I do think that we tend to get a bit obsessed with gears sometimes. When I bought my Swift, I was not sure if I could cope with only eight cogs and one chainwheel as my touring bike had ten cogs and three chainwheels. In practise I have had no problem with eight gears. I did lower the gearing by fitting larger cogs on the rear wheel (a straight SRAM replacement cassette) but I have never used the top two cogs (7 & 8) on the road - even downhill. The Swift is a great bike and, if you browse previous postings you will see that I have played about with my bike as much as anyone on this forum. However, the Swift is a great riding bike that happens to fold and at some point you have to accept that it will not be able to do all the things a large wheeled (700c) bike can do. It's my favourite bike by far and is always first choice when the open road calls but there is a limit to what you may expect of it - even with all kinds of mods.
I see where you are coming from, but...

For my needs / wants, I'd use my swift more often if it had a wider gear range. I like options, and since a front derailleur doesn't add a lot of weight / complication / expense for me(I've got plenty of spares just waiting to be used), Why not? Different strokes, and all that. Xootr giving people the option can only be a good thing.
bendembroski is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-08, 12:16 PM   #1630
werewolf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Arizona
Bikes: Swift folder, single speed
Posts: 857
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by noteon View Post
Yeah... but I think I actually have the mods more or less where I need them. Once I have grippier pedals and wider handlebars, I think I'm done. (Yes, I know, famous last words.)

If it weren't for that one *&$@%!!! hill, the stock model would have been so close to what I needed...

I've got two different platform pedals that are wide enough for my big feet and nice and grippy, if that's what you're looking for. I keep forgetting what brands things are, but I'll look them up for you if you're interested...oh yeah, SKS Toruring pedal, and - uh, I forgot the other one.

What big hill, going south on Broadway to 181st Street? (There are some super-steep side street hills just to the east there...almost in the scary San Diego/San Francisco category.
werewolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-08, 01:10 PM   #1631
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by werewolf View Post
I've got two different platform pedals that are wide enough for my big feet and nice and grippy, if that's what you're looking for. I keep forgetting what brands things are, but I'll look them up for you if you're interested...oh yeah, SKS Toruring pedal, and - uh, I forgot the other one.
Thanks. I ordered a pair of Grip Kings from Rivendell. They look a little less grippy than my FUNN Soljam Vipers, but they're silver.

Quote:
What big hill, going south on Broadway to 181st Street? (There are some super-steep side street hills just to the east there...almost in the scary San Diego/San Francisco category.
No, if I'm thinking of the right ones, it's steeper than those. Up from the greenway to the parkway. It's like the city engineers went Okay, the greenway blueprints are all done--whoah, wait a minute! We forgot to get the bikes back up to street level!, quickly made sure nobody was looking, whipped out their mechanical pencils, and dashed off a connecting squiggle mere seconds before the construction crew whisked the plans away.

I'm guessing none of these engineers were cyclists.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-08, 01:25 PM   #1632
werewolf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Arizona
Bikes: Swift folder, single speed
Posts: 857
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Noteon -

I meant going north to 181 St. Going south is downhill.

That Greenway hill you're speaking of must be something new that i don't know about - but if it's just one little steep hill why worry about special gearing for it? Just walk it.

I lived by the Dyckman Street entrance to the West Side Highway when they were rebuilding it down to the GW Bridge. It was closed to traffic for a while after it was repaved, and it was great for cycling! I also used to do multiple hilly loops around the Cloisters in Ft. Tryon Park for a workout. I also used to put on a heavy backpack and hike in the hills in Inwood Hill Park in the dead of winter for backpacking practice. I wonder if Sebast the Inwood Park hermit is still around. OK, enough about me and Noo Yawk.
werewolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-05-08, 01:44 PM   #1633
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by werewolf View Post
if it's just one little steep hill why worry about special gearing for it? Just walk it.
Partly because I just don't want to, partly because walking up it with a 20"-wheel bike and 130 lbs. of trailer and child lies somewhere between awkward and dangerous, and partly because the other hills around it, while less steep, are still significant when you're towing that much. (And now that I'm trying to remember all the reasons, also because I think the Swift will be my family touring bike if we ever actually get that family bike vacation together.)

Quote:
I lived by the Dyckman Street entrance to the West Side Highway when they were rebuilding it down to the GW Bridge. It was closed to traffic for a while after it was repaved, and it was great for cycling!
Dyckman is now the connecting street between the two greenways on the east and west sides of the island.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-08, 11:54 AM   #1634
vas jr.
Captain Ron
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: st. pete
Bikes: Merckx (fixed), De Rosa (not)
Posts: 148
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Braithwait View Post
I do think that we tend to get a bit obsessed with gears sometimes. .
I agree.
I run a 60 tooth sugino grand mighty chainring and a 14 or 15 tooth phil cog on the back.
Done.
vas jr. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-08, 12:15 PM   #1635
invisiblehand
Part-time epistemologist
 
invisiblehand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes: Jamis Nova, Bike Friday NWT, STRIDA, Austro Daimler Vent Noir, Haluzak Horizon, Salsa La Raza, Hollands Tourer, Bike Friday tikit
Posts: 5,547
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by noteon View Post
Anybody else notice this on the Xootr front page?
July 21, 2008 - Coming soon...Front derailleur mounts for the Swift. Stay tuned!
Nice. Although I got the sense from a conversation with Peter that cable routing to a road front derailer is problematic since they are generally bottom pull.
__________________
A narrative on bicycle driving.
invisiblehand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-08, 01:11 PM   #1636
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by invisiblehand View Post
Nice. Although I got the sense from a conversation with Peter that cable routing to a road front derailer is problematic since they are generally bottom pull.
Oh, speaking of cable routing, if anybody gets the Sram Dual Drive, be careful running cables near the lock, especially if the seatpost gets strangely harder to adjust. I have two mangled cable housings that I need to have replaced.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-06-08, 01:24 PM   #1637
invisiblehand
Part-time epistemologist
 
invisiblehand's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Washington, DC
Bikes: Jamis Nova, Bike Friday NWT, STRIDA, Austro Daimler Vent Noir, Haluzak Horizon, Salsa La Raza, Hollands Tourer, Bike Friday tikit
Posts: 5,547
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by noteon View Post
Oh, speaking of cable routing, if anybody gets the Sram Dual Drive, be careful running cables near the lock, especially if the seatpost gets strangely harder to adjust. I have two mangled cable housings that I need to have replaced.
Maybe a rollamajig would help with cable routing issues.
__________________
A narrative on bicycle driving.
invisiblehand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-08, 08:42 AM   #1638
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by invisiblehand View Post
Maybe a rollamajig would help with cable routing issues.
I'm looking at it, but I don't quite see how it would help. Here's a picture.

I blame myself for not realizing what was going on when the seatpost wouldn't slide or tighten easily.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-08, 11:11 PM   #1639
mosquito
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just got an internal gear hub, does anyone have a suggestion of mounting the shifter without a hubjub?
mosquito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-07-08, 11:34 PM   #1640
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 6,806
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
These shifters fit on flat or riser bars, just go the conventional way... or do you have drop bars?
jur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-08, 10:21 AM   #1641
deluxe
deluxe
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Deering, Nh
Bikes: Several, road and MTB.
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by euroswift View Post
I'm planning some travelling with my Swift. As the hard cases are a bit too bulky for me, I'd prefer packing the Swift into a softcase, ala Gaerlan:
www.gaerlan.com/bikes/case/case.html

Does anybody have any experience which softcases will do? The size should be relatively tight to keep the bicycle from bumping around. I plan to make some kind of inlet to hold the softback in form. To start with I'd like to get some advice if somebody has already played with the same idea.

Thanks
ES
I bought a suitcase from ebay that's 31x20x10 and the swift is snug in that. The case needed a new handle (made easily from parachute cord, but only cost 99 cents !!
That sized case is exactly 1 inch below the typical airline cut-off point, of 62 inches combined, so still should fly free if within the weight limit.
deluxe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-08, 03:21 PM   #1642
mosquito
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Bikes:
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have moustache bars.
mosquito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-08, 04:41 PM   #1643
jur
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 6,806
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by deluxe View Post
I bought a suitcase from ebay that's 31x20x10 and the swift is snug in that. The case needed a new handle (made easily from parachute cord, but only cost 99 cents !!
That sized case is exactly 1 inch below the typical airline cut-off point, of 62 inches combined, so still should fly free if within the weight limit.
Can you post a few pics?
jur is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-08, 08:31 AM   #1644
cosmodc
Fledgling
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: NW DC
Bikes: 1969 Raleigh Twenty, Bike Friday Seasons Tikit
Posts: 55
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A nice looking Swift with a 14-speed IGH (not mine, sadly):
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bikewal...7605035215202/
cosmodc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-08, 09:01 AM   #1645
deluxe
deluxe
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Deering, Nh
Bikes: Several, road and MTB.
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Case

Yes to rear wheel removal, yes to RD removal, yes to all other removals people generally make when packing their folders.
Though the case is soft, I got some sheets of hardboard and reinforced all the surfaces on the inside.....helps with any pointed/concentrated impacts......adds to weight, though it is easily removable if weight matters.
I also fabricated cheap spacers like BF sells that go through the complete bike when packed, to keep the suitcase sides well spaced. Made them out of PVC pipe, plumbing fixtures, hardboard, and epoxy......they work well, they're much more substantial than the BF model.
deluxe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-08, 09:03 AM   #1646
deluxe
deluxe
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Deering, Nh
Bikes: Several, road and MTB.
Posts: 18
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
case

Quote:
Originally Posted by jur View Post
Can you post a few pics?
Sorry, no pics now, will take some when I next pack.
Most of the time I just do a quick-fold, then pop it into a bag I made that's just the right size for a folded swift.
deluxe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-08, 09:04 PM   #1647
Billy500
all season cyclist
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Ottawa, Ontario
Bikes: Xootr Swift, old Pro-flex 550
Posts: 14
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Crossrack vs. Posthaste

Hello all,

I'm buying a Swift at the end of the month, thanks in a large part to the great discussion on this thread. My question is about bags---I am going to be doing a work commute, not far but will need to pack small laptop, lunch, etc. I was wondering if anyone has compared the Crossrack to the Posthaste rack, both sold as accessories on the Xootr Swift site. They both appear to have a max capacity of 25 pounds, and the Crossrack has the advantage of mounting front or back. The Posthaste has the advantage of accomodating 2 panniers and/or a rack bag--but I am wondering if this is a real advantage given the weight limitation.

The commuting thread has lots of material on various types of bags, but am interested in the "Swift" perspective! I've seen some of the comments on the crossrack, but my searches on "Posthaste" have come up blank.

Thanks in advance,
Bill
Billy500 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-08, 05:38 AM   #1648
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I haven't used one, but it looks as though the other advantage of the Posthaste is that it doesn't interfere with the fold. The Crossrack might or might not, depending on how high on the seatpost you need it to be, which will depend on both your saddle and your choice of pannier.

In my case, the Crossrack just barely works: I ordered an Arkel Bug (which is a great pannier/backpack for my purposes) online without ever trying one out first. I can get the Crossrack just high enough to keep the Bug from rubbing the rear tire if I put so high on the seatpost that it just touches my butt, put the seatpost so high that it's just at the outside of my good leg extension range, and use a bungee to raise the bottom of the Bug just enough to keep it off the tire. (That's when it's loaded with laptop and clothes. With less payload, I don't have to use the bungee.) The top of the Crossrack also just clears the loops on the back of my Brooks B17 saddle.

So my only recommendation, if you do choose the Crossrack, is to know what pannier you're going to use with it and try the whole thing out before buying either. I'm not bothered much by the tight clearances, and I really love the flexibility, not to mention being able to hang plastic grocery bags directly on the rack, even when there's a pannier there already. But other configurations (eg, a pannier with a smaller vertical dimension, or a rider with longer legs than mine) would work a little better.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit

Last edited by noteon; 08-13-08 at 05:41 AM.
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-08, 07:20 AM   #1649
tblott3
Archiboy
 
tblott3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: GRR
Bikes: 08 Xootr Swift, 06 Kona Smoke
Posts: 63
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy500 View Post
Hello all,

I'm buying a Swift at the end of the month, thanks in a large part to the great discussion on this thread. My question is about bags---I am going to be doing a work commute, not far but will need to pack small laptop, lunch, etc. I was wondering if anyone has compared the Crossrack to the Posthaste rack, both sold as accessories on the Xootr Swift site. They both appear to have a max capacity of 25 pounds, and the Crossrack has the advantage of mounting front or back. The Posthaste has the advantage of accomodating 2 panniers and/or a rack bag--but I am wondering if this is a real advantage given the weight limitation.

The commuting thread has lots of material on various types of bags, but am interested in the "Swift" perspective! I've seen some of the comments on the crossrack, but my searches on "Posthaste" have come up blank.

Thanks in advance,
Bill
I have not used the Posthaste either but I'm into my second week with the Crossrack. I have it mounted on the front. I love it. It will take just about any of my bags. It was the front rack I'd been needing for my Swift.
tblott3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-08, 07:48 AM   #1650
noteon 
Drops small screws
 
noteon's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NYC
Bikes: Heavily modified Xootr Swift, Trek 1000SL that's been turned into a brevet bike, two 20" Torker Interurbans
Posts: 2,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
tblott3, how much weight do you have on it? When I mounted mine on the front, I had steering issues.
__________________
RIDE: Short fiction about bicycles • RUSA #5538
Learning to wrench better this year—current project: Fixie from build kit
noteon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:12 PM.