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Folding Bikes Discuss the unique features and issues of folding bikes. Also a great place to learn what folding bike will work best for your needs.

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Old 07-17-13, 07:48 AM   #1
Still Pedaling
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Handybike?

What are these types of folding bikes like to ride? The wheels are so small, I wonder about any stability issues.

http://www.handybike.com/uk/index_netscape.html
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Old 07-17-13, 09:32 AM   #2
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One would think that just hitting a crack in the road would pitch you over the bars. Seems highly impractical to me.
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Old 07-17-13, 10:35 AM   #3
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One would think that just hitting a crack in the road would pitch you over the bars. Seems highly impractical to me.
I certainly do agree. Not worth the risk. I've had enough blows to the head years ago playing hockey. Don't need anymore .
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Old 07-17-13, 12:20 PM   #4
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What are these types of folding bikes like to ride? The wheels are so small, I wonder about any stability issues.

http://www.handybike.com/uk/index_netscape.html
"what's your prefect size?"


hmm. even my innuendos are better than that.

aside from the IDIOTIC webpage, the bike is actually pretty cool. the ride characteristics are similar to the Carryme. rapid acceleration and smooth cruising. i think these bikes were designed with the newly rich asian cities in mind. you know, the ones with the parks and skyscraper plazas all connected by a network of pristine paths and promenades paved with those ubiquitous hexagonal red flat stones. dodging traffic and hopping curbs in midtown manhattan you WILL NOT be doing. but, they are well made and thoughtfully designed (though with somewhat limited function). have you seen the three wheeler Carryme? a convenient way for the upper-middle class pensioner to get to and from the grocery market and do laps on the habitrail within the confines of his retirement community.



p.s. that's the designer riding the "carryall"
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Old 07-17-13, 02:05 PM   #5
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The beauty of the small wheels is that you haven't far to fall when you go down.

I was not a big fan of audio on websites, but the annoying short loop on this site has made me even less of one. I kinda wanted to find out more about the bike but I just couldn't stick around long enough. On the other hand, that may be a deliberate part of their marketing strategy.
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Old 07-17-13, 02:10 PM   #6
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For riding around a warehouse or other flat surfaces I guess it would be OK.
Forget it if you plan to ride but on real roads.

The Pacific Carryme has a strong following because it is said to be of quality build.
No one seems to like this bike though, it's not well built.
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Old 07-17-13, 03:41 PM   #7
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That poor girl. Guess the car shows were all booked.
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Old 07-17-13, 06:48 PM   #8
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For riding around a warehouse or other flat surfaces I guess it would be OK.
Forget it if you plan to ride but on real roads.

The Pacific Carryme has a strong following because it is said to be of quality build.
No one seems to like this bike though, it's not well built.
hmm. i've ridden one. i thought it was quite solid and a little more agile than the carry me.

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Old 07-17-13, 08:23 PM   #9
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The beauty of the small wheels is that you haven't far to fall when you go down...
Small wheels are like hoodies... they're misunderstood and get a bum rap.
It doesn't matter if a bike has small wheels or large wheels, the distance one sits from the ground is dictated by the seat height and bottom bracket height and the bottom bracket needs to be far enough from the ground to prevent pedal strike in turns... something dictated by crank arm length. So no, wheel size doesn't matter in this case.
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Old 07-17-13, 10:00 PM   #10
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Small wheels are like hoodies... they're misunderstood and get a bum rap.
It doesn't matter if a bike has small wheels or large wheels, the distance one sits from the ground is dictated by the seat height and bottom bracket height and the bottom bracket needs to be far enough from the ground to prevent pedal strike in turns... something dictated by crank arm length. So no, wheel size doesn't matter in this case.
I was just making a joke (perhaps not a good one), but you make a very good point. On the other hand, I'd make a bet with you - name the stakes - that the seat height/bottom bracket height on the Handybike is less than that of at least 90% of bikes made today.

I would also suggest that bottom bracket height is not "dictated by crank arm length", but crank arm length can be a factor.
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Old 07-18-13, 12:35 PM   #11
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I was just making a joke (perhaps not a good one)
Ooops, I missed that.

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I would also suggest that bottom bracket height is not "dictated by crank arm length", but crank arm length can be a factor.
I wasn't suggesting that a bike's bottom bracket (for arguments sake) will be 190mm from the ground if a 170mm crankarm is employed and 195mm for a 175mm crankarm. I was just stating the obvious... that you can't have a bottom bracket so low that the crankarm will strike.
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Old 07-18-13, 04:40 PM   #12
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[QUOTE=smallwheeler;15862111]hmm. i've ridden one. i thought it was quite solid and a little more agile than the carry me.
/QUOTE]

With no bracing, I can just imagine that long steerer post flexing a lot, nevermind what would happen if you did an endo which is likely with such small wheels.
Still, you would know better than me since you actually rode one.

I really don't know much about this bike myself, just throwing an opinion into the mix.
Read post 9 of this thread, maybe they are better now.
http://www.cyclingforums.com/t/316111/folding-handybike

If anyone gets one please write a review.
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Old 07-18-13, 08:41 PM   #13
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With no bracing, I can just imagine that long steerer post flexing a lot, nevermind what would happen if you did an endo which is likely with such small wheels.
Still, you would know better than me since you actually rode one.

I really don't know much about this bike myself, just throwing an opinion into the mix.
Read post 9 of this thread, maybe they are better now.
http://www.cyclingforums.com/t/316111/folding-handybike

If anyone gets one please write a review.
there is flex in the stem for sure, but it is nonetheless pretty solid feeling and the bike overall handles really well. i had the pleasure of using a handybike for a group ride in central park about a year and a half ago. the first thing i noticed about it was the high quality of the build. it's a conscientiously designed and well made bike. i've also had the pleasure of having a carryme in my possession for a week. in my opinion, the handybike and the carryme are designed for riding on smooth, level, pavement. bike paths in parks or promenades around corporate facilities come to mind. if you are really curious about them, try one if possible. personally, there just isnt enough versatility in either one of them, given my local terrain, for me to justify the price. they are fun tho'

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Old 07-19-13, 01:56 PM   #14
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I sometimes think of getting a Carryme although I don't know where I would ride it.

I'm sure many people are interested in such a portable bike.
So of these two bikes, which felt more solid to you?
Can you give us pros and cons of each?
Which one would you theoretically buy and for what reasons?
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Old 07-20-13, 03:42 PM   #15
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I own a Handybike and also tried the CarryMe. The latter is a good bit more stable. With the Handybike the seatpost has some sidewards play. The bottom bracket is to far forward. Crankarms/Frame ist a little flexy too, the pedals are crap. The overall build quality is quite ok though, the handlepost is surprisingly stiff for its length. I did some 5 to 10km tours on it. Works ok at average speed of 10-15 km/h and smooth pavement.
If you do not have another folding bike, the Handybike does a decent job for the "last mile problem" and you can get it cheap - though it can't hold a candle against Brompton or Dahon Curve.
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