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  1. #1
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    Some general questions about folding bike riders

    Hi!

    Because of a student project I started to read more about folding bikes. During my research I asked myself a lot of questions so I thought Iíll just ask the community what you think about it. I hope you can answer some of my questions.

    So firstly I asked myself why a bike rider chooses to buy a folding bike. I think folding bikes are very practical, whether because you donít have as much storage capacity or because of an improved mobility. Did you guys see someone riding around with a folding bike or did a friend of yours have one before buying one? Or did you just read something about folding bikes in a journal/on the internet and then decided to buy one?

    Secondly I was reading a lot about the different brands. To decide which brand you want to buy, did you read reviews or do you actually stick to a brand? Or do you rather prefer to go to a specialized retailer and seek advice (e.g. for test riding)?

    Thirdly I wanted to ask you if you think that folding bikes and the usage of folding bikes should get more attention/should be promoted, as more people would use their bike, for example to go to work (maybe in combination with public transport)? Or just to get out of the city and get some fresh air on their bikes?

    Looking forward to read some interesting answers/stories and thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Junior Member faroutttt's Avatar
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    1- I used to take a car then train to work. I saw someone with a folding bike (Dahon) on the train and that got me interested and I began to research them.

    2- I Googled the heck out of folding bikes and read many reviews, its what lead me to this site. I also stopped at the LBS and test road the lone folding bike they had, also a Dahon.

    3- Obviously I agree, folding bikes are just easier for commuting by train or bus in certain situations.

    I chose the Origami Cricket and now use that for my work commute twice a week. 3 mile bike ride to the station.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bhkyte's Avatar
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    Ok
    1) Bought folding bike from shop in sale as £50 new for alloy framed bike seemed silly not to. Then thought of a use for it.
    2)See above then comBination of try and get rid of what did not like, test rides internet, mainly used often unplanned bargin purchases.
    3) People who see my upgraded folders realise they can go quickly and are very versitile. But many people have the misconception that small wheels are slow, unstable etc. This is the main area for lack of growth and the fact hat most people spend less than £200 on a bike, which does not stretch to a proper folder.


    One often expands use after buying for commuting etc. I used to get unplanned lifts back from work and commute by train to uni.

    Now I rarely use my bike as a multi mode commuter, but its there when I need to, and ..................................
    Its offers so many options. Posted else where.....

    Yes I will Meet you there later, I will put the bike
    in the boot.

    I feel like some exercise, ill meet you at the
    supermarket.

    No you don't have to meet me at the train station,
    make it a local park.

    Think I will go off campus at lunch time.

    Its raining can I have a lift.

    Sling the bike in the car boot, I might have an
    explore.

    While son is at acvity I will go for a ride.

    I meet you for coffee, no I don't need to park.

    I don't need to park in the hospital grounds......

    I am getting on the nearest train carriage that has
    seats left.

    4 bikes in a car. No rack and four riders also.

    I drop the car off for the mot.

    I think I will leave the car here,bike back and pick
    them up later save petrol /parking again.

    Pedastianisted zone large carrier.

    Its ok I don't need to lock up my transport.

    I can get the bike through a pedasatian kissing gate.

    I don't need a locker it can go in the porch,toliet,broom cupboard, window sill,behind door,

    Terraced house, no problem.

    Saves times locking up, you can ride right to your destination. This was great at uni when the train was late etc.

    Other than above, I have just become more interested in small wheeled road and off road bikes and folders than other bikes. I like to go off road on a 20" folder simply as its different.

    I like the look of compact fast folders with drops or simular more than other types of bikes.
    Last edited by bhkyte; 10-21-13 at 06:25 AM.
    Dual drive Mezzo (GOLD), Dual Drive Mezzo with bullbars (black), White Brompton thingy with Dahon Androes stem and bull bars. Birdie (old sytle) 7 speed. Downtube NS8.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Still Pedaling's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntp folding View Post
    Hi!

    Because of a student project I started to read more about folding bikes. During my research I asked myself a lot of questions so I thought I’ll just ask the community what you think about it. I hope you can answer some of my questions.

    So firstly I asked myself why a bike rider chooses to buy a folding bike. I think folding bikes are very practical, whether because you don’t have as much storage capacity or because of an improved mobility. Did you guys see someone riding around with a folding bike or did a friend of yours have one before buying one? Or did you just read something about folding bikes in a journal/on the internet and then decided to buy one?

    Secondly I was reading a lot about the different brands. To decide which brand you want to buy, did you read reviews or do you actually stick to a brand? Or do you rather prefer to go to a specialized retailer and seek advice (e.g. for test riding)?

    Thirdly I wanted to ask you if you think that folding bikes and the usage of folding bikes should get more attention/should be promoted, as more people would use their bike, for example to go to work (maybe in combination with public transport)? Or just to get out of the city and get some fresh air on their bikes?

    Looking forward to read some interesting answers/stories and thanks in advance!
    I wish the projects they gave me in College were as interesting.

    Why did I choose a folding bike? Simple really. I got tired of lugging around larger steads on racks. If I went on a trip, I didn't like the idea of leaving the bikes on the rack while stopping off at a restaurant as an example, and a lot of hotels/motels weren't too keen on the idea of my wife and I wheeling our bikes through the lobby and up to our rooms. So, for us, the obvious choice was a pair of folding bikes that can be hidden in the back of the car and carried into hotels with little to no fuss.

    As far as brands went, I started off blind, so to speak. Didn't know one model from another, and with a tight budget we chose to go along with a couple of inexpensive folders from Camping World (Adventure brand). They didn't work out because I was having a problem with the rear hub. Like the old saying -- "you get what you pay for". Now came the work of reviews and getting answers to questions. This is when my visits here started, and since then I have learned a lot about folding bikes. One would think, and correctly so, mind you, that I should have done this step first. Instead I put the cart before the horse. I ended up reviewing many brands and models, but unfortunately there wasn't much to actually look at and test ride. Most bike shops, at least where I live, don't handle folding bikes. I did, though, come across a great dealer not too far from where I live that carried different brands; Brompton (which I finally settled on), Tern, Dahon (one model -- the Mariner), Bike Friday, Moulton, and Montague. I went there to look at the Dahon Mariner and the Tern Link C7. My wife was with me and became smitten on the Brompton and had one of the staff members go over the bike with her while I pedaled around their lot on the Mariner and C7. I liked both models, and were in my budget range without going into debt. Well, my wife was the one to convince me to get the Brompton and done with. Her philosophy was, "why not get the best so that down the road you won't have any regrets". I fell for her logic and purchased the Brompton. Unfortunately I don't own it outright due to going into debt for it . One big problem is -- we only have one bike to share between the two of us. My wife didn't mind because, the giving soul that she is was quite content to ride around on her mountain bike until we can purchase another folder, and she was willing to wait until we can afford another Brompton. Unfortunately it will be a long wait until I pay off the credit card for the one we own then go back into debt again for the second Brompton. Now we are in a situation where we are, once again, rethinking things out. Should we wait for another Brompton, which could take awhile, or spend our insurance refund on a lesser expensive bike for her. At least we have the one Brompton that she can ride when she wants, but another folder is needed if we plane to travel. Decisions are still pending.

    Do I think folding bikes should get more attention and be promoted? Most definitely. I honestly feel that, like all bikes, they are fun to ride and each type of bike obviously has its purpose, but I think for many, or perhaps I will go out on the limb here, and say that most riders will like or appreciate a folding bike because of its versatility -- ride, fold, carry, store, unfold, ride. Perfect for commuters and travelers alike.

    Lastly: I feel I made the right choice in bicycle type. I have owned road bikes in the past, and I presently own a mountain bike, but none of them have given me the pleasure of riding like my Brompton, affectionately known as a Brommie. I feel like a kid again when I'm out riding, and at my age -- "priceless"!!!

    Hope this helps with your project.

    Cheers
    Wayne
    Last edited by Still Pedaling; 10-21-13 at 09:27 AM.
    "It's best to remain silent and be thought the fool, then to open your mouth and remove all doubt" -- Mark Twain

  5. #5
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    Well I have to say, thank you so much for your answers! They are all super interesting and I really love to read all them!

  6. #6
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    1. Company downsized me from a very large pickup truck to a small sedan
    2. Found a Raleigh Twenty, then a couple of thrift store Dahons, cheap enough for my purpose, eventually want a Brompton or Bike Friday
    3. Absolutely, however they aren't for everybody for every situation.


    I have around 9 bikes that are folders/small wheeled/compact storage, they are all vintage which makes them a bit quirky, but make great conversation pieces. I do want something a bit more modern...eventually.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

    "Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
    RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
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    "Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
    Aluminum: barely a hundred
    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  7. #7
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    I already had several Non Folding Bikes ..

  8. #8
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    Speaking as someone new to folding bikes, I can pinpoint exactly why I wanted a folding bike: Because a folding bike allows me the most transportation options over a non-folding bike. If I want to get on a train or bus with a folding bike, I mostly can. Also I have this vision of attaching a canoe trailer to a bike for camping and a folding bike allowed the option of actually taking it in the canoe with me instead of leaving it on shore, vulnerable to theft. The option of taking a folding bike with me into buildings in a crowded city was also appealing over having to leave a non folder out of my sight.

    So I'd say the two major reasons I bought a folder is portability allowing incorporation of multiple transportation options - car, bus, train, canoe - when I need it and avoidance of theft.

    I chose a Dahon after seeing many positive reviews on both Bikeforums.com and Youtube.
    Last edited by chillspike; 10-22-13 at 01:36 PM.

  9. #9
    Senior Member fusilierdan's Avatar
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    I went on vacation to the beach once and wanted to ride but it was such a hassle to rent a bike that I didn't. I then decided to get a folder to take with me on vacation. I've flown twice with it and also take it in the car to go riding after work without going home first or to go into NYC for rides. My wife also has one and she doesn't like to ride on the road so we go to local trails to ride.

    I bought a cheap folder to start just to get a feel for them and then went to a specialty shop to test ride a few. I bought a second one to have for visitors.
    Giant TCRC2 2007, GT Avalance 2011,Dahon MU P8 2012

  10. #10
    Senior Member sail's Avatar
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    Saving two weeks bike rental on a vacation paid for half the folder after researching on the net. Didn't realize I would like riding folders better than big bikes and would want one costing 10 times more than the first.

  11. #11
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    I'll add my two cents...

    1) I have several standard-format bicycles but I chose to look into folding bikes because I was never a fan of bike racks on my cars. I live in the suburbs of NYC and ride bikes for fun and exercise. A few times a year I travel from NY to North Carolina and I bring a few bikes to ride while on vacation. I never liked leaving bikes on my car rack in hotel parking lots. Having the folding bikes allows me to lock / hide the bikes in the back of the car during trips.

    An added side benefit of having a folding bike is that I can leave it in my car in the event I can take advantage of good weather during a business trip as well. I often have to go away overnight within driving distance and keeping the bike in my car just-in-case allows me to get more fresh air if the weather permits.

    I am also looking forward to keeping a spare folding bike in my new NYC office to use during lunch hours.


    2) My first folding bike was a Dahon Mariner which I chose based upon selection available in my local bike store. I then bought a few Citizen bikes because I liked the price and options they provided. I've since bought a second Dahon (Mu N360) and a Tern (Joe P24). I love each of my bikes for different reasons. Their adjust-ability allows them to be shared by my family and guests because of their ease of adjustment for each rider.

    I made the purchasing decisions because of information I gained from online reviews and then backed-up by my own experiences when test riding the bikes at local shops.


    3) I am surprised at how many people notice my bikes on bike trails and stop to ask me questions. Many years ago I was an early adopter of rollerblades and used to get questioned all the time about them. I am now having the same experience with the folding bikes.

    Although you see folding bikes all the time in Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan...where I live in the suburbs you don't see them as much. So I don't mind people asking me questions about my folding bikes.

    I'm enjoying watching NYC become a more bike-friendly place to be. The Citibike rental program has given many people more options to get around in NYC. I like the slow-adoption process that is happening where I live and work. It couldn't hurt for there to be more advertising...I'm surprised that the larger manufacturers have not used posters on the suburban trains to get more awareness of their products.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntp folding View Post
    Hi!

    Because of a student project I started to read more about folding bikes. During my research I asked myself a lot of questions so I thought I’ll just ask the community what you think about it. I hope you can answer some of my questions.

    So firstly I asked myself why a bike rider chooses to buy a folding bike. I think folding bikes are very practical, whether because you don’t have as much storage capacity or because of an improved mobility. Did you guys see someone riding around with a folding bike or did a friend of yours have one before buying one? Or did you just read something about folding bikes in a journal/on the internet and then decided to buy one?

    Secondly I was reading a lot about the different brands. To decide which brand you want to buy, did you read reviews or do you actually stick to a brand? Or do you rather prefer to go to a specialized retailer and seek advice (e.g. for test riding)?

    Thirdly I wanted to ask you if you think that folding bikes and the usage of folding bikes should get more attention/should be promoted, as more people would use their bike, for example to go to work (maybe in combination with public transport)? Or just to get out of the city and get some fresh air on their bikes?

    Looking forward to read some interesting answers/stories and thanks in advance!
    1. Commute went from 19 mi o/w -- full size bike for commuting -- to 45 mi o/w, with commuter bus service. Options were: lock up a beater bike at the work bus station or get a folding bike. I don't trust that a bike would remain overnight or over-weekend without getting stolen, and not best practice to leave a bike out in the elements. Bus drivers hate having to pack full-size bikes in under-bus cargo and with this particular bus service, there's no guarantee I would not get bumped if there wasn't space for the bike.

    2. I was open to consider any brand -- fold to get it under the bus does not have to be the smallest, so I was more concerned with ride quality. Also, availability: I was buying used, so options were limited to timeframe. But I had read reviews on many, many folders, so when a Birdy by Riese & Muller came up at a reasonable price, I snapped it up. Seemed like fate.

    3. Yes, I think folding bikes do get more attention. Not sure about the promotion part of it, other than comments or envious stares from fellow bus riders. Once people see them, I think they sell themselves. ...Of course then they go to their local shop which does not stock any folders, but that's a different story...

    Unscientific observation reveals that people are more pleasantly disposed toward folding bikes than other types of bikes. The animosity from other road users is greatest on a drop bar road bike, average for flat bar bikes (mtn bikes - hybrids), lowest on freak-bikes like folders and tandems.

  13. #13
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    Mine was bought to be able to take a bike along on vacation and business plane trips to interesting places. Had seen an article in Bicycling! on the Bike Friday folder plus suitcase/trailer arrangement and then happened to see some in a bike shop while looking for a bike for my daughter. Had a business trip to Sweden and England coming up so I ordered one. Have now had it for 19 years and many trips.

    Being able to put it in the trunk of a car is frequently cited, but I usually just use my regular bike for that. I can pop the wheels off my 700c road bike and put it in a small sedan trunk as fast as a Tikit or Brompton, so it would only be an advantage if needing to carry more than one in the trunk.

    Locally the folding bike had an advantage since our subway/elevated train system restricted regular bikes during commute hours until a few months ago. Now that the restriction has been lifted I'll probably use my regular bike for trips into the city.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Still Pedaling's Avatar
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    ...I'm surprised that the larger manufacturers have not used posters on the suburban trains to get more awareness of their products.
    Module, It would definitely make sense for them to utilize every avenue for their advertisements, the train being a huge plus for sure. I would imagine that in cities like NY, there are many that take advantage of a folding bike. I have been to NY city twice, but it has been many years since my last visit. Back in the late 70's when I last visited, I don't recall anyone riding a bike. Now, of course, that has changed. What has NY done to make it a more friendly cycling town though? Yes, I'm sure, thousands ride their bikes around Central Park and perhaps many other parks, but the streets are what I'm thinking of. Are any of the main thoroughfares using bike lanes/paths now, or are all/most riders battling it out in traffic? I have seen a number of videos taken by foolhardy riders flying in and out of traffic as though they have a death wish. Not a very smart idea if one is to promote cycling in general. I would like to hear from those who live in NY and other large cities and relate what its like to get around on a folder on those crowded streets.

    Cheers
    Wayne
    "It's best to remain silent and be thought the fool, then to open your mouth and remove all doubt" -- Mark Twain

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    Quote Originally Posted by Still Pedaling View Post
    ...but the streets are what I'm thinking of. Are any of the main thoroughfares using bike lanes/paths now, or are all/most riders battling it out in traffic? I have seen a number of videos taken by foolhardy riders flying in and out of traffic as though they have a death wish. Not a very smart idea if one is to promote cycling in general. I would like to hear from those who live in NY and other large cities and relate what its like to get around on a folder on those crowded streets.
    Folder in a city makes a lot of sense. No experience with NYC, but I've traveled once to Boston with my Birdy, and it was a champ!

    Rainy day, so once I got off the commuter bus down to the city, I could choose to take my bike on the subway or ride it. Decided to take the subway and the bike sat in front of me, fairly unobtrusively.

    I'd previously had experience taking a full-size bike on the subway with me, and hands-down, folding bike is the way to go. Easier and people don't hate you as much.

    Once on city streets -- and I had at least three years experience bike commuting in the same area -- the fodling bike is an excellent choice. There's a lot of squeezing through tight spots in city traffic and short wheelbase, narrow handlebars is very much better than full-size counterpart. Also, acceleration with the smaller wheels was better.

    And people love them! Don't know why, but I get more favorable comments, more thumbs ups than on a full-size bike.

    Far as I'm concerned, folders are just about ideal for big cities.

  16. #16
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    I don't remember where I first read about folding bikes for certain, let me guess it was the Guardian newspaper online, but my inner eight-year-old said "cooooooool" and I started to look for more info. Then I finally saw one in real life, a rusted BSO*at a pawnshop, and got to actually sit on it. Low end folders are not built for the same range of human heights as regular bikes. They are meant for shorter people. I am short. So this was the first bike I'd straddled (since actually being that gadget-obsessed eight-year-old) that fit immediately. I was hooked.

    I put a deposit on the rusty beater, found out I was moving overseas, canceled it with great regret, moved, and hurled myself into Internet research. That led to this forum. I did not go to bike shops, although this city had them, because the array of bikes just blurred together into a mass of spokes. (Now that I am a regular rider, bike shops do not blur like that--but the ones I have visited so far still don't stock folders. Nor should they, in this town. My spotter's badge for this metropolitan area includes ONE other folder and it was a 26" wheel full-sized folding bike.) From here I learned about the niche between BSO beater bikes and brand names like Dahon, then picked out the favorite from among those small brands.

    A folding bike is a conversation starter for sure. I especially try to talk them up to short people and parents with sedate pre-teens. This price niche gets a short person a better fitting bike for less than a full size 26" frame, and the broad range of heights it fits is attractive for a growing teenager who doesn't ride hard. The other advantages of folders don't come into play in this sunny, wealthy suburb. Well, snob appeal might, but I am at least $1k shy of Brompton territory here.

    *Bicycle-Shaped Object = cheap steel toy, the very lowest quality of bike

  17. #17
    Senior Member rkokish's Avatar
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    My wife and I love bike touring but flying with our bikes as non-standard luggage had become prohibitively expensive, as much as $250 one way for one bike. We did a tour along the Danube on rented bikes and they were horrible. We rented bikes twice in Alaska. One set was junkers. The other was okay, but obviously not personally fitted, so not quite comfortable for long days in the saddle. I knew about folders, but thought they were intended only for commuting and would be unable to meet the demands of multi-day touring.

    Then an acquaintance who also tours told me about Bike Friday. Fridays are personally fitted and built to each buyer's specs. They are tough. People have ridden them around the world and even raced them in European Classics just to show what the bike is capable of. Fridays are also expensive, so I did a lot of research, comparing them to other brands. Ultimately, I decided to spend the extra money because we would have exactly the touring bikes we wanted; no compromises necessary. For example, we bought ours with 27 gear combinations ranging from 18 to 106 gear inches and a frame that will handle tires as wide as 42mm and still accept fenders - well suited for loaded touring, even on unpaved roads. (Not European Classics. though)

    Bike Friday starts by cutting tubes to accommodate rider measurements and preferences, then building the bike with exactly the parts one wants. (stems, gearing, seats, cranks set, brakes, pedals, tires etc.) Except for the folding frames, all parts are industry standard. If you need repairs while on tour, a local LBS can work on them and get replacement parts from the shelf or the nearest supplier. In the unlikely event of frame damage, the frame is high quality steel, the easiest material to get repaired anywhere in the world. The best part is not that these bikes fold, though that occasionally comes in handy, but that they quickly disassemble into ordinary Samsonite cases meeting airline size and weight requirements. They fly as standard luggage. We've used them all over this country and in Europe. In January we will take them to Viet Nam. I have four other bikes (good ones), but the folder is my favorite ride, even at home. It is durable, dependable, quick and comfortable. A hand built Friday IS pretty expensive. For commuters, I think some other folders are better (e.g Moulton, Bromptom) and most are more economical. But for touring, a Friday is worth every penny if you can afford one.

    Should folders get more attention for every-day use? Probably yes - they can certainly make commuting easier. But the trend seems to be toward bike-share programs, which have the advantage of taking up zero space on trains or buses and taking zero time to carry on and off.
    Ron Kokish
    Carbondale, CO

  18. #18
    Senior Member wahoonc's Avatar
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    Are Bike Fridays expensive? I don't think so, you are getting a lot of value for your dollar, especially when you consider it is a full custom build. Price a custom Bruce Gordon, or Bilenky and it is right in the same range, if not more. I had a BF NWT back in the early 90's and have regretted selling it to this day. Eventually I will get another one.

    Aaron
    Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

    ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

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    Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
    _krazygluon

  19. #19
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    Around 6 years ago I was living in LA and always had regular sized bikes.
    I knew about folders but never cared.
    Then my car got a flat tire at night in East LA.
    The next day I thought it would make sense to keep a small folder in the trunk of my car for emergencies or when I go to outings where a bike would make sense, so I got a Dahon Curve.
    It was a pretty cool contraption so I researched on this forum and online about other folding bikes.
    I have now owned several folders: Dahon's Curve D3, Curve SL, Silvertip, Mantis, Dove, and now a Strida 5.0.

    My bike needs have changed from emergency transport, to travel to foreign countries with a bike, and now it's about taking a bike through train systems.
    I still have regular bikes but think folders are the funnest because they are nimble to ride and good packaging designs.

    Sure they should be promoted more for commuting and pleasure.
    They are easier to store and deploy than regular bikes.
    I think most non-enthusiasts don't buy car bike racks so full size bikes are only ridden from home, but it's easy to put a folder in the trunk of a car and expand your cycling territory.
    Last edited by ttakata73; 10-26-13 at 10:01 AM.

  20. #20
    LET'S ROLL 1nterceptor's Avatar
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    1. I do some travelling a few times a year; so I want to bring a bike on my trips.
    Sometimes, I'm rushing to work and I might put my bike inside the bus or train
    to save some time on my commute.

    2. I read people's opinions on the web, asked people I see on the streets with their
    bikes what they thought about it.

    3. I think that cycling should be promoted, not just folders.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FR2TefqSjqQ

  21. #21
    Junior Member
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    My knee got screwed up and my doctor suggested bike riding. I bought a used Montague MX and love it. It folds up and I can stick it in my trunk (06 VW Jetta) so no one knows its there. I've taken it on the commuter rail to visit friends and use it whenever practical. Since we downsized from a house to a condo it;s nice to be able to fold the bike and put it in a closet so it's out of the way,

  22. #22
    Senior Member
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    1) My wife and I go through phases where we ride a tandem quite a bit, mainly for fitness. It is a blast to get out on the tandem , get in a rhythm and just roll. When riding the tandem alot we do group rides, centuries, doubles, etc and enjoy the camaraderie. During those tandeming times, I frequent the tandem forum and one day there was a thread about the ideal travel tandem.

    Many tandems are set up for touring and many tandemnistas love to travel that way. But my wife and I prefer to travel light and fast. Pre-Brompton we would each take a carry on and when visiting places walk extensively and use mass transit, preferring not to rent a car. But there are limits to this approach and sometimes that great restaurant that is three miles from the nearest transit stop just isn't worth the time commitment.

    Somehow I got onto the idea of using a folding bike to enhance travel. With the time and effort to walk one mile we can bike five. Assuming one walks at 3 mph and rides at 15 mph, in a 30 minute walk one can access 1.8 square miles. On a bike during the same time, one can access more than 44 square miles. If that bike can be quickly and easily placed on a bus, light rail, shuttle, ferry, water taxi, or cab (we have done all of these things) the travel opportunities, without a car are quite remarkable. Of course, we occasionally toss the Bromptons in the back of the car when we travel.

    2) I read reviews and we looked at bikes at various shops and rode them. With the goal of fast easy travel, our greatest need was for a quick compact fold, ideally not too heavy, ideally with a decent ride. We figured most of the time we would be riding distances of 5 miles or less, occasionally 10. While that has been typical, we have found ourselves covering 50 miles in a day or 120 miles over three days. We would definitely prefer the big bike for the long days, but the little Bromptons do well enough and they are unmatched when used for their intended purpose. We also like the custom bags that have evolved with the Bromptons. Like the bikes, they are not cheap, but they are well thought out. We have spent nearly 3 weeks in a foreign country with no luggage other than the Brompton T-bag (and the B-bag for the bike itself). I tried not to buy a Brompton because I did not want to pay that much but could find no suitable alternative, for OUR needs. I have absolutely no regrets about our choice, which was the correct one.

    3) I think folding bikes are a great solution for commuters and are ideal to supplement mass transit. For travelers like me they are great, but not everyone likes to travel the way my wife and I do.

  23. #23
    The Recumbent Quant cplager's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleDiamonDog View Post
    1) My wife and I go through phases where we ride a tandem quite a bit, mainly for fitness. It is a blast to get out on the tandem , get in a rhythm and just roll. When riding the tandem alot we do group rides, centuries, doubles, etc and enjoy the camaraderie. During those tandeming times, I frequent the tandem forum and one day there was a thread about the ideal travel tandem.
    Have you guys considered bike Fridays tandem?
    http://Charles.Plager.net
    http://RecumbentQuant.blogspot.com

  24. #24
    Senior Member
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    I'd like one of these please ..


  25. #25
    Senior Member smallwheeler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BruceMetras View Post
    I'd like one of these please ..





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