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Thread: Sour beers

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    on by skijor's Avatar
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    Sour beers

    Tried Anderson Valley's "The Kimmie, The Yink & The Holy Gose". Maybe it's just me, but if this is an example of a good sour beer, then I'm out. I tried Anderson Valley first because I love their IPA...simply awesome. But this sour beer thing...eesh.

    Are you a fan of sour beers? Suggestions...
    Last edited by skijor; 07-21-15 at 04:30 PM. Reason: typo

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    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Mean Like traditional British Bitters?

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    Disco Infiltrator Darth Lefty's Avatar
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    Are we talking lambic? That's an aquired taste for sure.
    Genesis 49:17

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    on by skijor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
    Are we talking lambic? That's an aquired taste for sure.
    I believe lambics would fall into the sours group. But 'sour' may be just the latest marketing buzz word. Perhaps it's because the average person can identify with 'sour'. But lambic means nothing to the average American beer drinker. I had heard of lambics but never tried any. The selection of sours around here is minimal, but what is available varies in ingredients...tart cherries, raspberries, blood orange, et al. They sound darned tasty, that's for sure.

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    Senior Member McBTC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skijor View Post
    Tried Anderson Valley's "The Kimmie, The Yink & The Holy Gose". Maybe it's just me, but if this is an example of a good sour beer, then I'm out. I tried Anderson Valley first because I love their IPA...simply awesome. But this sour beer thing...eesh.

    Are you a fan of sour beers? Suggestions...
    If that's what Belgian Ale is then I'm up for it but probably not in preference to a good IPA unless it's something like, Left Coast's Asylum.
    Alloy is Real

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    Quote Originally Posted by McBTC View Post
    If that's what Belgian Ale is then I'm up for it but probably not in preference to a good IPA unless it's something like, Left Coast's Asylum.
    Although I've never had LC's Asylum, it's safe to say that it's nothing like that. I am first and foremost a hophead. Generally not the uber-hopped offerings, though once in a while...

    A local tv station did a bit on sour beers, giving examples of the spectrum of a little tart to downright puckery. I gave some Monk's Sour Flemish Ale to my brother for his b'day. Haven't got his review of it yet. It's supposed to be more sour than what I tried.

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    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    Beers are BITTER, not Sour. Different taste buds..

    In Australia, Bitter is part of a beers name such as Victoria Bitter (VB), or Melbourne Bitter.

    Am I missing something? Are there new beers on the market calling themselves Sour?

    The bittering agent is the hops. Some bitter beers carry the bitterness better than others. To be honest VB isn't really a good beer. Its a mass market beer. Craft beers are usually made with more care and fresh hops(rather than pellets) so they carry the bitterness much better. Better balance.

    When it comes down to it though, a good beer is bitter.

    Anthony

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    Al noisebeam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AnthonyG View Post
    Beers are BITTER, not Sour. Different taste buds..

    In Australia, Bitter is part of a beers name such as Victoria Bitter (VB), or Melbourne Bitter.

    Am I missing something? Are there new beers on the market calling themselves Sour?

    The bittering agent is the hops. Some bitter beers carry the bitterness better than others. To be honest VB isn't really a good beer. Its a mass market beer. Craft beers are usually made with more care and fresh hops(rather than pellets) so they carry the bitterness much better. Better balance.

    When it comes down to it though, a good beer is bitter.

    Anthony
    'Sour' beers are older than bitters/hopped beers. Sorry 'bout the source, but this gives a decent overview of beers that fit under the 'sour' category:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sour_beer

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    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Local Microbrewery here has an Ale called "Bitter (The B word)" , its strong % too ..

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    Sour is up there in the niche beer market, which includes barrel aged - uber high alcohol stuff - and experimental (spices, flavoring, etc).

    Souring greatly varies from brewer to brewer. Some is spontaneously fermented in open containers, some has controlled fermentation then the funky yeast is put in at the end to give it the twang and some blend beer that has been intensely soured. You will get a range of flavors - tart, yeasty, dry, sweat, horse-blanket, etc. By themselves you would never enjoy the flavors. But in balance with malt and light hops (and often fruit) the flavors complement each other.

    Many breweries have one or two sours on tap nowadays. Definitely ask for a taste before hand. You can search online for reviews of bottled stuff. This often includes taste descriptions so you can see if it sounds good. A great starter sour is pretty much anything by Lindemans, which is a brewery in Belgian that specializes in sours. Kriek = cherry sour and framboise is raspberry. Both very drinkable for sours.

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    etw
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    I do like the sours, although some people I know don't care for them. The Belgians have so many incredible beers with different flavor profiles.
    One of my favorite sour beers is Rodenbach

    Rodenbach Classic (Red) | Brouwerij Rodenbach N.V. | BeerAdvocate

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    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noisebeam View Post
    'Sour' beers are older than bitters/hopped beers. Sorry 'bout the source, but this gives a decent overview of beers that fit under the 'sour' category:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sour_beer
    Thanks for the link. I think I've actually tasted some Sour beers but hadn't heard the term, "sour" being used to describe them.

    I home brew my own Kombucha Tea, Which is the result of feeding a sweet tea to a Symbiot of yeast and bacteria.

    It takes on a beer type result from time to time.

    Anthony

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    Senior Member JonnyHK's Avatar
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    Australian 'bitter' beers are really closer to pilsner or lager.

    I have tried a couple of quite sour beers. Can't recall the name now. Interesting, but only OK in small quantities.

    Had it here: Beer - Carwyn Cellars

    It may have been a 'sasion' beer, but that isn't pinning down the style enough.

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    Chepooka StupidlyBrave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skijor View Post
    Tried Anderson Valley's "The Kimmie, The Yink & The Holy Gose". Maybe it's just me, but if this is an example of a good sour beer, then I'm out. I tried Anderson Valley first because I love their IPA...simply awesome. But this sour beer thing...eesh.

    Are you a fan of sour beers? Suggestions...
    My favorite microbrew has been experimenting with lactobacillus as well. I don't like the results either.

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    Slacker ZippyThePinhead's Avatar
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    I typically drink IPAs and very little else, but I've had a few sours that I liked, such as Lost Abbey Red Poppy Ale, and once in a while I'll buy something that catches my fancy, like Brux or Elder Brett (both "wild" ales, not truly sours).

    You can't go wrong if you start with the top 250 lists at Beer Advocate: American Wild Ales, or Flanders Red Ales; in my experience, Beer Advocate scores tend to be more conservative and more realistic than RateBeer.com scores.

    Unfortunately, some of the top rated ones can be very hard to get, even if you live not too far from the source. I'm not actively searching, but I rarely see the any of the highly-sought Lost Abbey or Russian River stuff for sale here in CA. It can be so hard to find some beers, it makes a guy want to travel to the source:






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    on by skijor's Avatar
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    Thanks to all for the suggestions. Sours seem to have a larger grey area...can't really be pigeon-holed as easily as traditional beer styles. Beeradvocate, et al...have a variety of comments testament to the diversity/confusion of sours, wilds, krieks, framboise, etc.

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    I've never met a sour I liked. Beer week is coming up in about a month and from the list of events, the offerings will be heavy on sours and wilds this year. I'll give them an honest go, but I'm not getting my hopes up on finding any goto's from them.

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    Senior Member Nachoman's Avatar
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    I like sours a lot. Super unique taste.
    .
    .

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