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Old 05-01-17, 03:51 PM   #1
HardyWeinberg
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plumbing

Every time something breaks I have to learn something new. This time, in this house, it's sweating joints in copper tubing. In the last house it was easier, just galv tubing, like a giant wet lego set. Copper/brass looks fancier but is actually kind of easier, if you don't care how tidy your soldering is. Now I wonder about building a bicycle frame.
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Old 05-01-17, 04:03 PM   #2
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Be careful you don't burn your house down. There are precautions you can take. There are also options now for joining copper tubing chemically but I am not sure I would trust them.
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Old 05-01-17, 06:08 PM   #3
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I noticed after soldering the final connection (to the pipe that was already in place) that there was a warm spot on the shower wall on the other side from the pipe.
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Old 05-01-17, 06:37 PM   #4
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Check out Sharkbite products. Plumbing Parts & Products: PEX Fittings & More by SharkBite
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Old 05-01-17, 10:44 PM   #5
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Darn, you beat me to it.

PEX and sharkbites. That's how I do everything anymore......in front of the wall, behind the wall or in my attic (that's where they plumb houses with concrete slab floors in WA state). You're not supposed to put sharkbites behind or up there I've heard but they aren't leaking like my other amateur plumbing probably would be.
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Old 05-02-17, 06:02 AM   #6
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+2 for Sharkbite. I just learned about these a week or so ago during an emergency plumbing repair. I've never messed with plumbing stuff myself before this, and this product made the fix very easy, no leaks so far, and saved me probably a couple hundred dollars in repairs.
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Old 05-02-17, 07:35 AM   #7
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I've talked to a few plumbers, friends, family members, about closing sharkbite fittings in walls. None of them say it's a problem. They do make the job easier, and you can undo them just as easy.
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Old 05-02-17, 02:45 PM   #8
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Great to hear about!
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Old 05-02-17, 04:43 PM   #9
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I saw Sharkbite products in the store and figured it was too easy to work. I'll keep that in mind if I need to do any plumbing work.
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Old 05-02-17, 05:12 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HardyWeinberg View Post
I noticed after soldering the final connection (to the pipe that was already in place) that there was a warm spot on the shower wall on the other side from the pipe.
I've done quite a bit of soldering in the past, and what you want to do, is put a metal plate of some sort, right behind where you solder. That keeps the flame from starting a fire, usually, provided you have room for the metal plate.
If there's no room, use a spray bottle to douse the area good with water, and solder carefully, with a fire extinguisher close by, just in case.
I've never used those shark bite things yet, either, but someone was telling me about them, a couple months ago. If they work as well as folks say, and aren't cost-prohibitive, then by all means, use them. 🙂
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Old 05-03-17, 03:21 PM   #11
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I try to be pretty hand around the house, but I draw the line at fire.

Our current house we bought from the bank, it had been vacant 2 years, and the water heater was toast. I replaced the water heater myself (just hooking up the hosepipes), but the copper inlet valve was corroded/blocked or had a bad valve or something, that I couldn't deal with. A plumber came out (Christmas Eve! I remember waiting around until he was done so we could leave for relatives).

This inlet pipe was about 2inches away from drywall. He had this can of heat-protective gel that he sprayed behind, and set to it with the torch. Turned out he couldn't weld/sweat/whatever apart, because there was water in there that kept the temp down. I think he had to cut it out in the end, but sweated in a new piece.
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Old 05-03-17, 05:50 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HardyWeinberg View Post
Every time something breaks I have to learn something new. This time, in this house, it's sweating joints in copper tubing. In the last house it was easier, just galv tubing, like a giant wet lego set. Copper/brass looks fancier but is actually kind of easier, if you don't care how tidy your soldering is. Now I wonder about building a bicycle frame.
As you replace bad pipes, remember this advice, "Shark Bites and Pex" are your best friends!
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