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Old 01-27-06, 08:53 PM   #1
phantomcow2
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Recommendations for plunge type router?

I am getting to the point where i need a router, not the linksys type.
Huge power is not necessary, but 1HP would be nice. Will be taking lightish cuts into MDF, softwoods, things like that. But it will be moving fast
*Variable speed is a must*
Should be fairly inexpensive, im not saying 20 bucks is my max but i dont want to spend 150 on this thing either. I dont care how it feels in your hand, as long as it cuts.
It would be preffered if it could hold larger than 1/4" tools. 3/8 maybe

And lastly, needs to run on 110v
Anybody have recommendations?
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Old 01-27-06, 10:18 PM   #2
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Is this for your CNC machine? Why does it need to be plunge type, something to do with the way you control it vertically? I'm not sure you're going to get much less than $150 unless you buy used, but a good way to start would be to stop by Sears to browse their selection. It's possible that Harbor Freight may have a Chicago brand plunge router, but it probably wouldn't have the power and durability for the type of use I suspect you're talking about.

I think all of the routers I've seen run on 110v.
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Old 01-27-06, 10:37 PM   #3
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it does not need to be a plunge type. As long as its got a spindle, that accepts router bits, that spins maybe up to 20,000RPM, and has ~1HP
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Old 01-27-06, 10:51 PM   #4
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well if I cant find anything reasonable, I am just going to make something using a 1.5HP 6500RPM DC motor and controller I have. Setup a pulley system with a 1:4 reduction, and ive got decent power and really pushing high speeds.
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Old 01-28-06, 03:43 PM   #5
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Sears Router Selection

The good thing about routers is that the spindles are really well made so that there is very little vibration, and they can last for a decent amount of time. It might be pretty tough to duplicate that with a pulley system (I can't think of any applications off hand that run a pulley at 25,000 RPM).
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Old 01-28-06, 06:15 PM   #6
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i have a bosch plunge/fixed combo router. it or the porter cable are the top choices in that realm. they are way out of the price range you are looking at though

the skil combo set is about a $100 and has 2hp and got a "best value" rating from fine woodworking magazine

dont forget about bits...they are expensive. 1/2" are way superior to 1/4"

i am concerned about the type of machine you are contemplating building. routers are actually fairly dangerous tools. a proper collet is essential. a decent/stable table is also very expensive...like a benchdog or jessem
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Old 01-28-06, 07:34 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by iamlucky13
Sears Router Selection

The good thing about routers is that the spindles are really well made so that there is very little vibration, and they can last for a decent amount of time. It might be pretty tough to duplicate that with a pulley system (I can't think of any applications off hand that run a pulley at 25,000 RPM).
Smaller bearings, particularly ceramic bearings, can handle that speed and more without problem. I would make a pulley myself from aluminum. As long as I get the pulleys right, i would be fine. One good thing about this setup would be that i could make my own quick change tool system with relative ease.
That skil router looks like a pretty hefty machine, might see if I can find a deal with it.

Another thing,
when they say like 1/2", 1/4", what are they reffering to? Is this in reference to the diameter of the shank of the cutter?

I don't concern about the danger of the router, or a table. I am making my own table, and wont be manually controlling the router anyways. It will be clamped in an aluminum holder and glorified
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Old 01-29-06, 12:51 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by phantomcow2
Another thing,
when they say like 1/2", 1/4", what are they reffering to? Is this in reference to the diameter of the shank of the cutter?
Correct. 1/4" and 1/2" are the two standard sizes. You can get pretty much any profile of bit in a 1/4" collet, but some of the larger swath bits are only available in 1/2" because cutting a big chunk of material while spinning at 30,000 RPM puts a lot of cyclic stress on the bit. Since people who need 1/2" bits are usually frequent users, they are usually the high quality (pricey) bits. It sounds like you probably won't need 1/2" capacity for this project, though.

I have a hunch that aluminum would not be the best choice for a shaft, although for the pully it shouldn't matter, but I still recommend going with an actual router if you need that kind of RPM's.
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Old 01-29-06, 01:28 PM   #9
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http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...lance&n=228013

Hitachi is a good value in routers.
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Old 01-29-06, 04:31 PM   #10
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WEll i ended up going for the Skil 1825. Its got over 2HP, variable speed, and 1/2" capability. This router will be 24x44" capacity, so it is going to be pretty fast, this does increase the load. With that, i think 1/2" will be my best bet.
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Old 01-29-06, 07:13 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by sngltrackdufus
Wise choice on the .500" & variable.
I hope so. Why are so many routers fixed speed?
I know nothing about woodworking, but i would imagine 22,000RPM would burn the wood often enough.

ANother question,
How does the router hold cutters? Is it just a collet, any special taper? Is there a drawbar for the collet?
I ask because i would like to make Quick change tool holders
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Old 02-01-06, 08:06 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by phantomcow2
I hope so. Why are so many routers fixed speed?
I know nothing about woodworking, but i would imagine 22,000RPM would burn the wood often enough.

ANother question,
How does the router hold cutters? Is it just a collet, any special taper? Is there a drawbar for the collet?
I ask because i would like to make Quick change tool holders
The slow speed is for safer operation with large diameter bits such as panel raising bits that are 2 or 3 inches across. For bits up to 1.5 inches across, the single speed works fine. You avoid burning the wood by taking multiple light cuts and keeping the router moving.

The collet system is not tapered. Your router probably has a 1/4 inch and a 1/2 inch collet. If so, buy 1/2 inch shank bits when you can. Less chatter due to shank flex. Anyway, loosen the collet, slide the shank of the bit in, tighten the collet.

Wear safety glasses. Be careful to feed the router past the wood in the correct direction to avoid kick-back.

BTW, Skill is not my favorite brand. I think it is popular with people who don't want to spend much and will only use them a couple times a year. Just my opinion based on looking at them and reading woodworking forums. No actual hard data on that.

There is a company that makes quick change router bit holders. Most people do like Norm Abrams and just buy more routers.
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Old 02-01-06, 08:21 AM   #13
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So the collets for routers are not tapered? How are they held into place?
As long as the router maintains its speed, has good power, I am a happy person. I know its not top of the line, but i just dont think top dog is necessary for my application. I am looking forward to seeing how much runout the spindle has. Ideally it would be .003" or less, but i can live with more
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Old 02-01-06, 09:50 AM   #14
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So the collets for routers are not tapered? How are they held into place?
Well, there is a taper involved, but not on the interface between the collet and the shank of the bit. The inside edge of the collet is a cylinder almost the same diameter as the shank. The collet has a slot along one side that allows it to be compressed and become a slightly smaller diameter. The outside of the collet is tapered and there is a matching tapered hole in the end of the router's spindle. The outside of the router's spindle is threaded. Tightening the nut that encases the collet pushes the collet into the hole in the end of the spindle and causes the collet to reduce in diameter and grip the shank of the bit.
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Old 02-01-06, 11:31 AM   #15
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www.toolcrib.amazon.com

They often have factory refurbished used tools. At the price you mentioned, I'd say Dewalt is the best bet. They are not the very best, but you get your moneys worth, thats why I have a Dewalt drill and reciprocating saw. My boss has had a Dewalt router for 8 years, and it has yet to let us down.
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Old 02-01-06, 10:13 PM   #16
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By the way, did anybody else who say the "British United Thread" think for a second that it was phantomcow asking a question about British pipe threads?
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