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    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Tomato question

    I like guacomole and I want to grow my own tomatos.

    (I grew somelast year but a thing ate the flowers)

    Has anyone tried a black tomato before?
    I read they have a smokey flavor..but I wonder if people like them or don't. Maybe I should just stick with a red heirloom of basic cherrykind. I dont think I want to know what an orange or green tomato tastes likes, yuck=p. Hm..I hate the eat tomatos by themselves, but yet I cannot wait to grow them

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    Senior Member -VELOCITY-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJ123
    I like guacomole and I want to grow my own tomatos.
    Um. I think avocado's are the main ingredient of guacamole.

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    I've had the purple tomatoes, which are just a shade lighter than the black ones. Didn't taste any smokier to me. Roasting them in an oven will help that though, or, if you're willing, smokin' them over wood in a Webber (or other charcoal burning grill with an oven) will be even better.
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    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by -VELOCITY-
    Um. I think avocado's are the main ingredient of guacamole.
    Yes, but could I grow avacados in 75-80days?

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    Senior Member -VELOCITY-'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJ123
    Yes, but could I grow avacados in 75-80days?
    Not sure. I really don't know much about agriculture. How fast do tomatoes grow?

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    I think avocados are persnickity about their environs, and, you need to have both a male and female plant for the female tree to bear fruit. They particularly don't like the cold. If your climate ever gets anything close to freezing, forget it. Not to mention, you'd have to wait a while for the trees to be big enough (mature) to produce fruit. Stick with buying the avocados and growing the tomatoes. Tomatoes are annuals...and thus you get instant gratification. And, growing the hot peppers is also a lot of fun. You could plant a couple types of tomatoes, three different hot peppers, make the salsa to go with the avocados.
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    My tank takes chocolate. FlowerBlossom's Avatar
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    p.s. to above: "awhile" means years for the avocados.

    For the tomatoes, depends on the hybrid you buy...some are 60-90 days, some longer.
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    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by -VELOCITY-
    Not sure. I really don't know much about agriculture. How fast do tomatoes grow?
    75-80 days, haha.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerBlossom
    p.s. to above: "awhile" means years for the avocados.

    For the tomatoes, depends on the hybrid you buy...some are 60-90 days, some longer.
    I thought about doing the pepper deal. I remember 2 summers ago I had a jalepeno plant. I didnt know anything about it and I thought that when it was green and large it was ready to eat. Then it turned red, and I'm like oooh.

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    I've lived in Avocado country and work for a company that makes guacamole. Forget the avocados, it can take generations before you get a good crop starting from seed. From LA south you can grow them, buying a plant big enough to have a few each year (4 to 7 feet tall). Just buy them. We fire-roast our own tomatoes, a tricky business using a 30 foot long continuous oven and a wierd spiral chiller conveyor. Fire-roasting does help the flavor, see if you can buy them. Try substituting sun dried tomatoes. Easier to buy or do yourself.

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    What kind of jalepenos are these?

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    Quote Originally Posted by EJ123
    I thought about doing the pepper deal. I remember 2 summers ago I had a jalepeno plant. I didnt know anything about it and I thought that when it was green and large it was ready to eat. Then it turned red, and I'm like oooh.
    Double oooh. You can dry the extras, too, for use in the winter.

    You can probably get some good heat where you are at. If you get a couple types of pepper, you can have fun with the heat. Some peppers are hot at the front of the tongue, some don't start burning until it's too late (). And, if you don't have a lot of space, you can buy some cheap pots (or get them at a garage sale), one plant per pot. You not only have an aesthetically pleasing crop, but a culinary delight. I know a great source for organic fertilizer that is the BEST for solans (tomatoes, etc) and peppers. Organic fertilizer, as in, no petro-chemicals involved, special blend.
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJ123
    What kind of jalepenos are these?
    About 2-feet high type?

    Seriously, I dunno. Hybrids...they all look the same w/o a flower or fruit. With a fruit, I might be able to guess the type of pepper, but, don't ask me about any specific type of jalapeno...I'm no good at that!

    edit: P.S. Pots...you beat me to it. Nice looking plants. You've got a green thumb. Or, should I say, a hot thumb.
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    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerBlossom
    About 2-feet high type?

    Seriously, I dunno. Hybrids...they all look the same w/o a flower or fruit. With a fruit, I might be able to guess the type of pepper, but, don't ask me about any specific type of jalapeno...I'm no good at that!

    edit: P.S. Pots...you beat me to it. Nice looking plants. You've got a green thumb. Or, should I say, a hot thumb.
    Thanks. Im just good with flowers, sadly...and that jalapeno plant was half grown when I got it

    I did however grow this little garden my self:


    It has merigolds, golden giant amaranth, soy beans, pumpkins, and tomato. I took that pic in july of 2005, and I wish I took more pictures in august when everything was much larger. I can't wait to start tomatos.

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    Lovely! Nice mixture and color. I grew giant amaranth one year. It ROCKS! I had 2 kinds; one red leaves with a dark burgundy inflorescence, one green leaves with golden inflorescence (probably similar to the golden that you grew). The amaranth were taller than my SO, who's 6'8". Amazing, especially since I live in Olympia, WA, where our summers are nothing like yours down there.

    Thanks for sharing. It reminds me to put amaranth on my seed list. Can you grow nasturium? They are easy, and, you can get packets that are color mixes. If you're diligent (I am not), you can harvest seed for next year; it should be viable, unless the evil seed company has them so hybridized that they are duds.
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    My tank takes chocolate. FlowerBlossom's Avatar
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    And, back to the guacamole, you should also try growing garlic sometime. Around here, you plant them about the same time in the fall when you plant tulips, then, about June or July you harvest. That's all you do. It's great, especially in the spring, when you see the sprouts coming up when everything else is still sleepy. Not to mention a very important food group. Roasting (and eating, of course) your own garlic is very self-satisfying, and, amazes your guests.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerBlossom
    Lovely! Nice mixture and color. I grew giant amaranth one year. It ROCKS! I had 2 kinds; one red leaves with a dark burgundy inflorescence, one green leaves with golden inflorescence (probably similar to the golden that you grew). The amaranth were taller than my SO, who's 6'8". Amazing, especially since I live in Olympia, WA, where our summers are nothing like yours down there.

    Thanks for sharing. It reminds me to put amaranth on my seed list. Can you grow nasturium? They are easy, and, you can get packets that are color mixes. If you're diligent (I am not), you can harvest seed for next year; it should be viable, unless the evil seed company has them so hybridized that they are duds.
    I remember seeing a packet of seeds for the dark burgundy one nicknamed "love lies bleeding" but I know what you're talking about...a pretty neat color too. I seem to only know basic plants and what not, so I dont really know what nasturium is=p. I wonder if I can find some packs.
    I also thought about garlic (I like those on pizzas haha) but I worry I'll smell like garlic Do you mean from seeds? I dont think I've ever found a supplier for that. If so, Ill be willing to give it a shot.

    One herb I think is pretty unique is the Dotted Mint herb. Have you ever heard of it before? Ive tried 2 seasons to grow them, and the same year, 05, I managed to get about 6-7 inches of the plants, which I usually got about 1 prior to that...but I left for vacation and they all died. Surpisingly Im out down a bike path, I look to my left on the ground, and I'm like "haha that looks like the plant." Apparently it was so that was nice to see a whole bunch of that there. It looks nice too:

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    That almost looks illegal, but oh so sweet.

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    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    Hi,
    by black do you mean Russian Krim? They are nice.
    1) Climate plays a huge role in determing what tomatoes do well in your area.
    What works for me up north, might not do so well for you.
    2) You have enough heat that I would try to plant them in a shady spot.
    3) Do not let them dry out. This will mean daily watering at times. You also
    have to avoid overwatering.
    4) Tomatoes like magnesium, a lot of dirt does not have enough. I always
    add some compost or organic fertiliser.
    5) Roughly speaking, they come in sizes, cherry, mid size, and big guys.
    You want at least one of each. Expect a high rate of failure until you find varieities work. You can cut that down to nil by going to a good nursery, asking their advice and buying their seedlings.

    I like....
    Sun gold cherry
    Sweet hundreds (or millions) cherry
    Black Krim (amazingly ugly, but tasty, it will be so mushy it will want to fall apart when ripe)
    Burpee Beefsteak... with the right growing conditions, it is almost superb
    Paste tomatoes.. have low water content and I like them for salsa.
    Italian tomatoes don't do crap im my yard, but some are exquisite and might be perfect for yours. Try a couple.

    My favorite fertiliser is North Country Organics Pro Gro
    http://www.norganics.com/fert.html

    Umm, taste... small ones tend to be sweeter. The Black Krim isn't smoky, just the strongest tomato flavor I have ever seen. If I was in Texas, I'd consider automatic watering, the kind that shoots small amounts right into the roots.

    Some beginners, not that I would know this personally add too much fertiliser. Saw a guy in the news once that had to use a ladder because the plants were 10-15 feet tall. If you get a bag of compost and another of garden soil... you can mix them, dig a hole about a foot deep, fill it and let the tomatoes
    grow in that. It will work fine.

    Don't forget the tomato cages, where you are you will likely wind up adding poles and tying the cages to poles for extra stability. Especially if you are liberal with fertiliser! Not that I would know personally, you understand

    One year my backyard looked like a cobweb and the tomatoes started growing up and then along the twine. When that happens you wind up knocking on neighbors doors trying to give them away. You know you have used too much fertiliser when they stop answering the door.
    Last edited by late; 03-18-07 at 05:41 AM.

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    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by late
    Hi,
    by black do you mean Russian Krim? They are nice.
    1) Climate plays a huge role in determing what tomatoes do well in your area.
    What works for me up north, might not do so well for you.
    2) You have enough heat that I would try to plant them in a shady spot.
    3) Do not let them dry out. This will mean daily watering at times. You also
    have to avoid overwatering.
    4) Tomatoes like magnesium, a lot of dirt does not have enough. I always
    add some compost or organic fertiliser.
    5) Roughly speaking, they come in sizes, cherry, mid size, and big guys.
    You want at least one of each. Expect a high rate of failure until you find varieities work. You can cut that down to nil by going to a good nursery, asking their advice and buying their seedlings.

    I like....
    Sun gold cherry
    Sweet hundreds (or millions) cherry
    Black Krim (amazingly ugly, but tasty, it will be so mushy it will want to fall apart when ripe)
    Burpee Beefsteak... with the right growing conditions, it is almost superb
    Paste tomatoes.. have low water content and I like them for salsa.
    Italian tomatoes don't do crap im my yard, but some are exquisite and might be perfect for yours. Try a couple.

    My favorite fertiliser is North Country Organics Pro Gro
    http://www.norganics.com/fert.html

    Umm, taste... small ones tend to be sweeter. The Black Krim isn't smoky, just the strongest tomato flavor I have ever seen. If I was in Texas, I'd consider automatic watering, the kind that shoots small amounts right into the roots.

    Some beginners, not that I would know this personally add too much fertiliser. Saw a guy in the news once that had to use a ladder because the plants were 10-15 feet tall. If you get a bag of compost and another of garden soil... you can mix them, dig a hole about a foot deep, fill it and let the tomatoes
    grow in that. It will work fine.

    Don't forget the tomato cages, where you are you will likely wind up adding poles and tying the cages to poles for extra stability. Especially if you are liberal with fertiliser! Not that I would know personally, you understand

    One year my backyard looked like a cobweb and the tomatoes started growing up and then along the twine. When that happens you wind up knocking on neighbors doors trying to give them away. You know you have used too much fertiliser when they stop answering the door.

    Thanks for the reply. Above all I wish it'll be pest free heh.

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    My tank takes chocolate. FlowerBlossom's Avatar
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    A very lovely mint. Too bad it didn't stay in the container; mints spread like wildfire and soon can overtake a garden. If they are in your garden, you might think about transplanting the ones you found and tearing up the rest. You won't have enough room for the guacamole ingredients.

    Garlic I've planted are the cloves! For some reason, I've always been told it's "seed garlic", meaning you plant them, not eat them. I don't know if the garlic you buy in the store would be good for planting, and, I don't know if the 'seed garlic' would be good for eating. All I know is that I head to my local organic garden shop, buy the heads when they come out in October, and plant the cloves about 8" apart.
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    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerBlossom
    A very lovely mint. Too bad it didn't stay in the container; mints spread like wildfire and soon can overtake a garden. If they are in your garden, you might think about transplanting the ones you found and tearing up the rest. You won't have enough room for the guacamole ingredients.

    Garlic I've planted are the cloves! For some reason, I've always been told it's "seed garlic", meaning you plant them, not eat them. I don't know if the garlic you buy in the store would be good for planting, and, I don't know if the 'seed garlic' would be good for eating. All I know is that I head to my local organic garden shop, buy the heads when they come out in October, and plant the cloves about 8" apart.
    Is the garden you have in the ground, or did you make a special raised kind with the wooden perimeter or something? I have about half an acre in the backyard, but it's all dirt and weeds heh, so Im very limited with land. I just picked up some tomato seeds and some jiffymix starters for the seeds

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    My tank takes chocolate. FlowerBlossom's Avatar
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    Half an acre!!! WOW. That's huge! My entire property is 0.24 acres. You could grow all your food!!! Get rid of any grass and fill it with a garden. Imagine, no more mowing....!!!!

    I have raised beds and containers. Right now, they are stacks of 2x4s, 8ft lengths, cheapest grade=cheapest price. I use three of these to make one layer, had the store cut one in half, giving me two 4" ends and two 8" sides, to make 4x8 frames. Two beds are two-frames-high, one bed is three-frames-high. Next year, I'm getting more dirt and adding another level. Three-high are definitely better on the back. It's too late for this year, as I'm already planting spinach and strawberries and prepping for tomatoes.

    I decided to use wood because of the biodegradability of the wood. NEVER use treated wood; you'll be eating that stuff as it leaches from the wood into the soil. Then, when the wood rots, you can mix the soil (as you're supposed to do every year but I'm too lazy).

    And, with wood you can attach brackets that hold bendable plastic tubes (pvc?) and make a frame for a hot-house over each bed. You might not need a hot-house where you are, but, here in Western Washington, a hot-house not only extends the season long enough to harvest a ripe tomato ...a very big issue here... it also keeps the water out, helping keep the chances of tomato blight down.

    Last year, I need to rest my beds from any solans (3 yr rotation in these parts), so, I used a huge pot for one tomato plant, and grew to fit the pot (huge). I also have my mint in a pot, and should have my oregano in a pot (it also spreads like wildfire), and will grow basil in pots as well as my herb garden. I would not hesitate to grow hot peppers in pots; a thai pepper plant would be very pretty (they are small fruits with upright growth form). I also have stevia in a pot (as it doesn't like the cold, so it's in a pot so I can move it to a more protected area).

    Back to tomatoes: have you ever seen or eaten the dark green heirloom variety? I don't know the name (darn it), but, at ripeness, it's this lovely deep green...almost a shade of grass green, and taste just like a ripe red tomato! I ate some for the first time last fall at a Seattle microbrewery (Jolly Rogers, for those who are interested). They had a seasonal dish, this plate of tomatoes with slices of green, the purple tomatoes I talked about earlier in this thread, and yellow tomatoes. They sprinkled the entire plate with feta and a balsamic reduction and served with carmelized onions (and roasted garlic, or olives, or both? maybe, I don't remember exactly) and thick crusty bread. It was FABULOUS.
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    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlowerBlossom
    Half an acre!!! WOW. That's huge! My entire property is 0.24 acres. You could grow all your food!!! Get rid of any grass and fill it with a garden. Imagine, no more mowing....!!!!

    I have raised beds and containers. Right now, they are stacks of 2x4s, 8ft lengths, cheapest grade=cheapest price. I use three of these to make one layer, had the store cut one in half, giving me two 4" ends and two 8" sides, to make 4x8 frames. Two beds are two-frames-high, one bed is three-frames-high. Next year, I'm getting more dirt and adding another level. Three-high are definitely better on the back. It's too late for this year, as I'm already planting spinach and strawberries and prepping for tomatoes.

    I decided to use wood because of the biodegradability of the wood. NEVER use treated wood; you'll be eating that stuff as it leaches from the wood into the soil. Then, when the wood rots, you can mix the soil (as you're supposed to do every year but I'm too lazy).

    And, with wood you can attach brackets that hold bendable plastic tubes (pvc?) and make a frame for a hot-house over each bed. You might not need a hot-house where you are, but, here in Western Washington, a hot-house not only extends the season long enough to harvest a ripe tomato ...a very big issue here... it also keeps the water out, helping keep the chances of tomato blight down.

    Last year, I need to rest my beds from any solans (3 yr rotation in these parts), so, I used a huge pot for one tomato plant, and grew to fit the pot (huge). I also have my mint in a pot, and should have my oregano in a pot (it also spreads like wildfire), and will grow basil in pots as well as my herb garden. I would not hesitate to grow hot peppers in pots; a thai pepper plant would be very pretty (they are small fruits with upright growth form). I also have stevia in a pot (as it doesn't like the cold, so it's in a pot so I can move it to a more protected area).

    Back to tomatoes: have you ever seen or eaten the dark green heirloom variety? I don't know the name (darn it), but, at ripeness, it's this lovely deep green...almost a shade of grass green, and taste just like a ripe red tomato! I ate some for the first time last fall at a Seattle microbrewery (Jolly Rogers, for those who are interested). They had a seasonal dish, this plate of tomatoes with slices of green, the purple tomatoes I talked about earlier in this thread, and yellow tomatoes. They sprinkled the entire plate with feta and a balsamic reduction and served with carmelized onions (and roasted garlic, or olives, or both? maybe, I don't remember exactly) and thick crusty bread. It was FABULOUS.
    Yeah those raised beds are pretty cool, and neat to have. I would really like to cut out maybe a 4-10 section in the backyard, board the permeter up and add some nice soil...but costs sure can add up Well it's a good thing to start early, that's for sure=p Garlic actually sounds pretty fun right now. I don't know much about it, expcept I like the taste lol, but how long does it usually take to grow right around harvesting time?

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    My tank takes chocolate. FlowerBlossom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJ123
    Yeah those raised beds are pretty cool, and neat to have. I would really like to cut out maybe a 4-10 section in the backyard, board the permeter up and add some nice soil...but costs sure can add up Well it's a good thing to start early, that's for sure=p Garlic actually sounds pretty fun right now. I don't know much about it, expcept I like the taste lol, but how long does it usually take to grow right around harvesting time?
    The easiest way (i.e., laziest) is to put down landscape cloth under the beds; it costs more but saves you time that you can then use to go biking. Landscape cloth allows water to drain, so, you can set-up the frames/beds immediately and right over the landscape cloth. Plastic is cheaper; lay it out in the size you want, to kill the grass. Wait a while (months), remove the plastic, then build on top of it. This would be one way to start slow, save your pennies for soil while you are waiting for the grass to die.

    Have you checked out the cost of having a dumptruck of soil delivered? It's a heck of a lot cheaper than using bagged potting soil. Be careful of the soil you are getting; you don't want any soil that was taken out of a superfund site or anything like that. You can ask your local garden centers for recommendations, both positive or those stay-away-from's.

    In Western WA, if we plant in October, depending on the variety, we can harvest garlic around June or July. But, it gets hot where you're at, sooner than up here. There are books for growing garlic for the Pacific Northwest region (were I live); I bet if you asked around or searched the internet you'd find information on what works best for your region. Extension offices might be a good place to start. Yeah, garlic is great. Growing...it's really just a matter of putting the clove in the soil and then waiting for harvest time.
    Feminism is the profound notion that women are human beings.

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