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  1. #1
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    Is this a possible home network setup?

    Basically, in my house, we have 5 computers. I have my battle station, and my satellite station (aka. laptop). My mom has her desktop station and a laptop for work. My father has got a laptop.
    Initially when we got internet, it was only in my mom's office. This didn't fly with me, especially when broadband came along. So I bought a wired router and wired cat5 cable into 4 rooms. When I feel like going on my laptop, I almost certainly want to be online. But it is also almost certain that one of my parents are using the one remaining cat5 outlet. After a year of fighting over who gets to use the outlet, I bought a wireless router. So I have it, and I now have time to set it up. Is it possible to get the following configuration? Well, it pretty much has to be, because there is no alternative.

    Modem --> Wired router ---> supplying internet to comps via cat5e
    ---> Wireless router ---> supplying internet via wifi to laptops as required

    So the thing is, I want to keep my wired and wireless router. Three of the wired router's outputs are going to comps wired into my network, the one remaining output will be the input of the wireless.
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  2. #2
    Footballus vita est iamlucky13's Avatar
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    Absolutely.

    There is one potential issue that may crop up, which that the wireless router might experience an IP conflict with the one assigned by the wired router. Usually the fix is to turn off DHCP on the wireless router, but I had a bit of trouble screwing around with other settings to get it to work on a Qwest modem/router I was setting up for someone else once.
    "The internet is a place where absolutely nothing happens. You need to take advantage of that." ~ Strong Bad

  3. #3
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    Excellent. Do you know of any guides available that can outline just the steps involved? Not necessarily how to do, but WHAT to do.
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  4. #4
    phony collective progress x136's Avatar
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    Why can't you use the new router in place of the old one? Does it not have ethernet ports? When I added wireless to my network, I just replaced the old, wired-only router with the new wireless-capable router.

  5. #5
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    THere's a few reasons.
    1. The old router is downstairs in the basement, all four outputs being used. Wifi signals would have to pass through concrete walls, wood, and tile to reach upstairs. This decreases the power somewhat, so I understand.
    2. I actually want the extra LAN outputs.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    I agree with x136. Hook up the wireless router first after the modem. Then cascade the older router into it and use in hub/switch-mode only (leave the WAN port unplugged). The 1st router is the only one in the chain that will assign DHCP addresses.
    Last edited by DannoXYZ; 07-09-07 at 12:44 AM.

  7. #7
    just for randya gaston_45's Avatar
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    You can just add the wireless router to any of the outlets you already have. To do this, however, you will need to buy or make a cross over cable.

  8. #8
    Roadmaster Snobbery Club bhtooefr's Avatar
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    Not necessarily, some have auto-sensing.

    However, I would turn OFF all router functions, so it acts as an access point, if at all possible. Some routers don't let you do this, some do.

    (Wireless routers in access point mode are how my work's implemented a wireless access point.)

    If you CAN'T make it work as an access point, then you should be OK, except for one problem. That problem will be that you can access anything in your wireless network and wired network from a laptop (or a desktop plugged into the wireless router,) but you cannot access anything in your wireless network from the wired network, unless you forward the ports for the relevant computer (or put it in the DMZ.)

    Also, if you want to expose a port on a computer that's on the wireless router to the internet, you'll have to forward the port at the router, like normal, and then go to the wired router and forward the wireless router's IP.

    For basic configuration (as in, other than disabling the routing functions) of the wireless router, usually defaults work, but if it requires you to pick a connection type, it'll be cable, that'll get it to select the correct settings to connect to the wired router. Actually, it'll be cable for most things - old-school PPPoE clients aren't that common any more, the PPPoE stuff is all built into the DSL modem.

    And, for the love of $DEITY, set up security and a non-default SSID! "phantomcow2" is good enough for the SSID, and I'd set it to not broadcast (so you have to type it in to connect.) For security, set up WPA-PSK using RSA if you can. (Order of preference: WPA-PSK RSA, WPA-PSK TKIP, WEP 128-bit, WEP 64-bit, no security.)
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  9. #9
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    Security was something I thought about as well. It looks like I have the following options available:
    WPA-PSK [TKIP]
    WPA2-PWK [AES]
    WPA-PSK + WPA2-PSK [AES]
    And of course 128 and 64 bit WEP

    I only did a 128 bit WEP though, because I have to figure out how to setup the computers to deal with WPA
    C://dos
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  10. #10
    Roadmaster Snobbery Club bhtooefr's Avatar
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    Bah, I meant AES, not RSA.

    (RSA does make products that can provide security over RADIUS, but they're irrelevant to you.)

    WPA2 is an option, though... your wireless card might not support it, but it's much more secure than regular WPA. I wasn't even thinking about WPA2...
    2011 TerraTrike Path 8
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