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eubi 08-17-07 10:35 AM

Registered Professional Engineers
 
You know, a lot of members and posters to this forum are engineers.

I wonder how many of you have your Professional Engineer (P.E.) licenses?

In this case, being a Registered Professional Engineer doesn't mean you simply get PAID to do engineering work.

You have to graduate from an accredited engineering university, take the Engineer in Training (EIT) exam, work in industry under another PE for a specified time (usually four years), and take the PE exam for your discipline. There are other ways to earn a PE, but this is the most common.

With a PE, your state recognizes that you have the skills to be an independant engineering consultant, serve as an expert witness on court, sign off on building drawings, etc. You get a cool newsletter every quarter listing all the PE's that have been disciplined for malpractice. :(

I'm guessing a lot of you Civil Engineers have "P.E." after your name. They are a bit rarer in other disciplines.

Eubi, P.E.
Mechanical Engineer M26779

trsidn 08-17-07 10:42 AM

I do. 5 states.

-VELOCITY- 08-17-07 10:54 AM

Wow. I'm always on the lookout for a good PE to sign off on my drawings. Too bad you're so far from me.

trsidn 08-17-07 10:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by -VELOCITY- (Post 5090355)
Wow. I'm always on the lookout for a good PE to sign off on my drawings. Too bad you're so far from me.

heh, you know better than that:)

R900 08-17-07 11:07 AM

I passed the EIT and SIT, but never did much CE work after college... so never qualified for a PE.

dauphin 08-17-07 11:10 AM

sorry to temporarily hijack the thread, but I am considering buying an historic building that is about 150 years old. Any idea what kind of engineer would inspect such a structure and report on it's condition? Any idea how much such an inspection would cost?

wolfpack 08-17-07 11:32 AM

Wolfpack, PE
Civil Engineering

CliftonGK1 08-17-07 11:37 AM

Not a P.E., because I didn't graduate a formal engineering background.
Does regular membership to SME (Society of Manufacturing Engineers) with technical experience in lieu of a CMfgE count?

bluebottle1 08-17-07 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trsidn (Post 5090277)
I do. 5 states.

Don't suppose you do any expert witness consulting, do you?

trsidn 08-17-07 12:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluebottle1 (Post 5090816)
Don't suppose you do any expert witness consulting, do you?

Thought about it, what expertise would be required?

bluebottle1 08-17-07 12:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trsidn (Post 5090959)
Thought about it, what expertise would be required?

I don't have anything in particular at this point, but these things are always coming up. Sometimes its mechanical operation, sometimes oil platform safety. It really varies from case to case, but I'm always on the lookout for solid consultants.

trsidn 08-17-07 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluebottle1 (Post 5091003)
I don't have anything in particular at this point, but these things are always coming up. Sometimes its mechanical operation, sometimes oil platform safety. It really varies from case to case, but I'm always on the lookout for solid consultants.

Nah, I do traffic. I have done hurricane damage inspections, but after the last 2 years, I don't want to do that anymore.

bluebottle1 08-17-07 12:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trsidn (Post 5091020)
Nah, I do traffic. I have done hurricane damage inspections, but after the last 2 years, I don't want to do that anymore.

Any accident reconstruction?

trsidn 08-17-07 12:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluebottle1 (Post 5091070)
Any accident reconstruction?

I need to take a class, I have never actually done one.

bluebottle1 08-17-07 12:44 PM

Well, doesn't sound like our fields intersect. Too bad. It's always nice to be able to present an expert who literally is a part-time consultant and not some paid mouthpiece who has a huge footprint on either the plaintiff or defense side of the bar.

trsidn 08-17-07 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bluebottle1 (Post 5091119)
Well, doesn't sound like our fields intersect. Too bad. It's always nice to be able to present an expert who literally is a part-time consultant and not some paid mouthpiece who has a huge footprint on either the plaintiff or defense side of the bar.

heh, not really how that would work, either. I do work for a consulting firm, so it's not like I am really free to persue outside projects....

I am still occasionally getting called up for hurricane related stuff. Not fun.:(

crtreedude 08-17-07 12:55 PM

No degree only too much experience, awards and various other things. I am not certified in anything (though perhaps certifiable at times)

Hasn't held me back for sure.

trsidn 08-17-07 01:04 PM

The license is simply the noose they hang you with in the lawsuit.

alainp 08-17-07 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dauphin (Post 5090483)
sorry to temporarily hijack the thread, but I am considering buying an historic building that is about 150 years old. Any idea what kind of engineer would inspect such a structure and report on it's condition? Any idea how much such an inspection would cost?

PE in Civil and also a Structural Engineer. The licenses can be a benefit and a liability. They gain you credibility in the profession and typically (or should) lead to higher pay and upward mobility. Regarding the liability issue, you can become a "target" in the event anything goes wrong, even when it is clear the engineer was not at fault.

Civil Engineering is a very broad discipline. You can have civil engineers with expertise in structural engineering, land surveying, hydraulics, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, traffic engineering, construction management, etc... and I'm probably even missing a few specialties.

Now, back to your question about the building purchase. It really depends on what you want to do with it. If you plan to continue and maintain its present use/occupancy, the building code does not require you to do anything. However, if you intend to use it for something that it was not previously permitted for, then you'll have to upgrade the building to meet ALL of the current building code requirements. And that typically means seismic/structural upgrades, exiting/egress upgrades, etc... In that case you should be dealing with a design team (architect, civil/structural engineer, etc...). In other words... BIG BUCKS!!!

If you're just trying to get an assessment of the building's current structural condition, you could contact a structural engineer (or civil engineer specializing in structures) and find out. But, just like any and all projects, estimates vary so you should get a few quotes. But, shooting from the hip, I'd guess anywhere around a few hundred to several thousand bucks for such a report. I know that's a wide range but its dependent on many things (i.e. size, complexity, condition, availability of as-built drawings and specifications, etc...).

It would probably be helpful if you contact your local building department to find out what other requirements they would impose at that level.

Sorry to be so long winded but hope this helps :)

alainp 08-17-07 01:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trsidn (Post 5091269)
The license is simply the noose they hang you with in the lawsuit.

Exactly! They always need a scapegoat...

free_pizza 08-17-07 03:32 PM

2 years into my EIT, can write my EIT exam whenever i want. I still have 4 engineering experience reports to write and the exam before i get my P.Eng.


free_pizza E.I.T

jtnmb77 08-17-07 04:07 PM

jtnmb77-PE Civil Eng.

free_pizza 08-17-07 04:08 PM

Do you guys wear your rings?

trsidn 08-17-07 04:11 PM

wedding ring

skinnyone 08-17-07 04:11 PM

Is this something very specific to Civil Engineering? I am EE and I have never heard of a PE in what we do..


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