Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 43

Thread: Peanut Butter

  1. #1
    Merde! road monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Farmin' it in Vermont
    My Bikes
    '07 Trek 1000 - '07 Cannondale SystemSix
    Posts
    88
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Peanut Butter

    Smooth or Crunchy?
    If you can't beat them, arrange to have them beaten.

    Good health begins at the farm, not at the pharmacy, Go organic!

  2. #2
    phony collective progress x136's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    San Hoosey
    My Bikes
    http://velospace.org/user/36663
    Posts
    2,958
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There is only smooth. If I wanted to eat peanuts, I would.

  3. #3
    Hazardous Taerom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Quarantine
    My Bikes
    2005 Trek Liquid 55, 2009 Haro Mary SS
    Posts
    727
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't eat peanut butter too often any more, but when I do, it has to be crunchy. Smooth is just so...boring.

  4. #4
    Why not? EthanYQX's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Canada
    My Bikes
    Giant STP 2
    Posts
    808
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Is it poisonous to bears?
    "It is not the critic who counts."

  5. #5
    KombuchaCHIC Shadiyah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    SLC,UT
    My Bikes
    Santa Cruz Juliana, 2005 Bianchi Pista
    Posts
    496
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Almond butter...raw

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
    My Bikes
    '71 Raleigh Sports, '84 Schwinn LeTour on the trainer (and available for hill repeats), '06 Scott CR1 SL (Ksyrium SL), and a yet-to-be-determined TT bike.
    Posts
    1,643
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When it's purely food, either. When deposited elsewhere, smooth.

  7. #7
    Rawwrrrrrrrrr! wolfpack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Clayton, NC
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Ruby Sworks SL w/SRAM Red; 2006 Fuji Team RC; 2008 Felt F1x; 1980's Lotus Excelle; Mangusta FG/SS; Rossin (yet to be built up)
    Posts
    2,732
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)


    hmmm, where might you be be depositing it???

    oh, and smooth.
    wolfpackcycles
    skiffrun: Enjoy the ride. Ride for the enjoyment.

  8. #8
    Not so fast
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by VegaVixen View Post
    When it's purely food, either. When deposited elsewhere, smooth.
    Deposited elsewhere? Don't know why that makes me laugh.

    Chunky, though it's kind of silly since I also go for the natural stuff and that has all the peanuts on top.

  9. #9
    J3L 2404 gbcb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Shanghai
    My Bikes
    2007 Jamis Nova
    Posts
    1,069
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Wrote this recently -- seems appropriate to post it here :

    I'm a big fan of China's many regional cuisines, which provide a nearly endless array of mouth-watering dishes: solid, proletarian Beijing dumplings, grilled lamb skewers from Muslim western China, delicately steamed fish from Hong Kong, sweet Shanghainese "red-cooked" pork, fantastic green vegetables from just about everywhere, and, my favourite, the exquisite "numb-spicy" dishes of Sichuan.

    But sometimes, I just really need a peanut butter sandwich.

    China's cuisine is many things, but every so often it will come up short, and a craving for a peanut butter sandwich is one that Chinese food is particularly ill-equipped to satisfy. Firstly, there's the problem of the bread. "Western-style" bread in China, as in perhaps every Asian country other than Vietnam, is at best a weak approximation of the concept. It is as if bakers have tried to reverse-engineer recipes from photographs of foreign loaves, without ever having tasted them. The result is bread that looks fantastic, but has the consistency and flavour of an old bath sponge. My current preferred brand is a step above most, but still makes my teeth squeak when I eat it.

    Peanut butter, thankfully, is an area in which China excels. In addition to a wide range of local brands, international p-b giant Skippy is well-established here, and its products — both smooth and crunchy — can be found in many local supermarkets. This, however, is where the story gets interesting.

    At first glance, China's busy supermarkets are visions of plenty. Behind their shiny exteriors, however, is a re-stocking system that could generously be called "spotty". I still remember the day that my neighbourhood supermarket in Beijing simply stopped selling bacon. There was no explanation: it was as if it had never existed. I was disappointed, but took it in stride. Then, suddenly, the peanut butter disappeared.

    Assuming it had been relocated in one of the supermarket's pointless bi-monthly reorganizations, I asked the store manager where I could find it.

    "We don't have it any more," he said.

    Worried, I continued: would they be getting more?

    "We might get more, but we might not. I don't know."

    And just like that, the peanut butter was gone, its place taken by a random selection of salted plums and something called meat floss. The next few days went by in a blur as the cold reality of life without peanut butter sank in.

    When I saw peanut butter back on the shelves a week later, I was euphoric. That feeling came crashing down a moment later as I discovered that the variety on offer was a pirated version of Skippy. Now, I can understand a pirated handbag or coat, but I draw the line at knowingly eating knock-off food products — especially when each jar of supposedly identical peanut butter had its own distinct hue.

    The Skippy did eventually return, but I had learned my lesson: I began stockpiling peanut butter in anticipation of the next shortage.

    When I moved to Shanghai, I was dazzled. For the first few months after my arrival, I couldn't stop talking about my supermarket. Forget peanut butter — hell, it had balsamic vinegar!

    How quickly the lessons of the past are forgotten.

    By this time, my tastes in sandwiches had expanded, and I was venturing into recreational mayonnaise use. I thought I could stop any time. Little did I know I would be forced to quit cold turkey when it vanished from even the fancy foreign supermarkets.

    What had happened? Who was to blame? How could an entire city of 19 million people suddenly run out of mayonnaise?

    I pondered these questions for weeks, unable to find an answer.

    And, just as suddenly as it had disappeared, the mayonnaise was back.

    And what mayonnaise! The old standbys like Kraft were there, to be sure, but there was so much more. German brands I had no hope of pronouncing filled the shelves, their contents held suggestively within flexible tubes rather than the familiar, rigid jars. Light mayonnaise, "real" mayonnaise, spiced mayonnaise — it was all there.

    I grabbed a selection and headed for the cashier. Standing in line was a friend of mine, his shopping basket filled with two dozen cans of tomato sauce, his eyes filled with a triumphant gleam. We nodded at each other knowingly — for today, at least, we were both victorious.
    Last edited by gbcb; 12-09-07 at 05:37 PM.

  10. #10
    POWERCRANK addict markhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    North Acton, West London, UK
    Posts
    3,783
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by road monkey View Post
    ...Crunchy?
    There is only one option.
    shameless POWERCRANK plug
    Recommended reading for all cyclists - Cyclecraft - Effective Cycling
    Condor Cycles - quite possibly the best bike shop in London
    Don't run red lights, wear a helmet, use hand signals, get some cycle lights(front and rear) and, FFS, don't run red lights!

  11. #11
    Hazardous Taerom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Quarantine
    My Bikes
    2005 Trek Liquid 55, 2009 Haro Mary SS
    Posts
    727
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This thread is making crave PB. I have a jar in my cupboard, but no cinnamon raisin bread to put it on. Cinnamon raisin is the only kind of bread for peanut butter sandwhiches.

  12. #12
    coffeeeeee p4nh4ndle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    somewhere in Pennsyl-tucky
    My Bikes
    all that I ride
    Posts
    238
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    mmmm... mf&j (meat floss and jelly)
    wait... ugh, that sounds terrible

    p.s. not to rub it in, but i make my own. best pb EVAR!

  13. #13
    Third World Layabout crtreedude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Costa Rica
    My Bikes
    Cannondale F900 and Tandem
    Posts
    3,061
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Crunchy - and we only get it occassionally.

  14. #14
    POWERCRANK addict markhr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    North Acton, West London, UK
    Posts
    3,783
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gbcb View Post
    Wrote this recently -- seems appropriate to post it here :

    I'm a big fan of China's many regional cuisines, which provide a nearly endless array of mouth-watering dishes: solid, proletarian Beijing dumplings, grilled lamb skewers from Muslim western China, delicately steamed fish from Hong Kong, sweet Shanghainese "red-cooked" pork, fantastic green vegetables from just about everywhere, and, my favourite, the exquisite "numb-spicy" dishes of Sichuan.

    But sometimes, I just really need a peanut butter sandwich.

    China's cuisine is many things, but every so often it will come up short, and a craving for a peanut butter sandwich is one that Chinese food is particularly ill-equipped to satisfy. Firstly, there's the problem of the bread. "Western-style" bread in China, as in perhaps every Asian country other than Vietnam, is at best a weak approximation of the concept. It is as if bakers have tried to reverse-engineer recipes from photographs of foreign loaves, without ever having tasted them. The result is bread that looks fantastic, but has the consistency and flavour of an old bath sponge. My current preferred brand is a step above most, but still makes my teeth squeak when I eat it.

    Peanut butter, thankfully, is an area in which China excels. In addition to a wide range of local brands, international p-b giant Skippy is well-established here, and its products both smooth and crunchy can be found in many local supermarkets. This, however, is where the story gets interesting.

    At first glance, China's busy supermarkets are visions of plenty. Behind their shiny exteriors, however, is a re-stocking system that could generously be called "spotty". I still remember the day that my neighbourhood supermarket in Beijing simply stopped selling bacon. There was no explanation: it was as if it had never existed. I was disappointed, but took it in stride. Then, suddenly, the peanut butter disappeared.

    Assuming it had been relocated in one of the supermarket's pointless bi-monthly reorganizations, I asked the store manager where I could find it.

    "We don't have it any more," he said.

    Worried, I continued: would they be getting more?

    "We might get more, but we might not. I don't know."

    And just like that, the peanut butter was gone, its place taken by a random selection of salted plums and something called meat floss. The next few days went by in a blur as the cold reality of life without peanut butter sank in.

    When I saw peanut butter back on the shelves a week later, I was euphoric. That feeling came crashing down a moment later as I discovered that the variety on offer was a pirated version of Skippy. Now, I can understand a pirated handbag or coat, but I draw the line at knowingly eating knock-off food products especially when each jar of supposedly identical peanut butter had its own distinct hue.

    The Skippy did eventually return, but I had learned my lesson: I began stockpiling peanut butter in anticipation of the next shortage.

    When I moved to Shanghai, I was dazzled. For the first few months after my arrival, I couldn't stop talking about my supermarket. Forget peanut butter hell, it had balsamic vinegar!

    How quickly the lessons of the past are forgotten.

    By this time, my tastes in sandwiches had expanded, and I was venturing into recreational mayonnaise use. I thought I could stop any time. Little did I know I would be forced to quit cold turkey when it vanished from even the fancy foreign supermarkets.

    What had happened? Who was to blame? How could an entire city of 19 million people suddenly run out of mayonnaise?

    I pondered these questions for weeks, unable to find an answer.

    And, just as suddenly as it had disappeared, the mayonnaise was back.

    And what mayonnaise! The old standbys like Kraft were there, to be sure, but there was so much more. German brands I had no hope of pronouncing filled the shelves, their contents held suggestively within flexible tubes rather than the familiar, rigid jars. Light mayonnaise, "real" mayonnaise, spiced mayonnaise it was all there.

    I grabbed a selection and headed for the cashier. Standing in line was a friend of mine, his shopping basket filled with two dozen cans of tomato sauce, his eyes filled with a triumphant gleam. We nodded at each other knowingly for today, at least, we were both victorious.
    That's funny - biggest problem in the UK is companies like Green&Blacks, Ben&Jerry, etc., being bought out and immediately changing recipes and ingredients. Bang went my supply of decent ice cream and chocolate hazelnut spread.

    When I lived in a 3rd world country, supermarkets would sometimes stock production over-runs of export food. While China isn't 3rd world could it be occasional excess stock manufactured and bottled in China?
    shameless POWERCRANK plug
    Recommended reading for all cyclists - Cyclecraft - Effective Cycling
    Condor Cycles - quite possibly the best bike shop in London
    Don't run red lights, wear a helmet, use hand signals, get some cycle lights(front and rear) and, FFS, don't run red lights!

  15. #15
    Master Surfer of Curbs glenng's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    70%PIT 30% Blue Yonder
    My Bikes
    Whats it to ya?
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Grew up on it so I`m a PB authority. Crunchy FTW. Krunky close 2nd
    Glenn

  16. #16
    Mr. Maximan1 maximan1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anaheim and Fullerton (SoCal)
    My Bikes
    Puch Superleicht, Nishiki moutain project, Trek 2300 carbon composite
    Posts
    1,301
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Smoothy

  17. #17
    Senior Member ryder47's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    54
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Crunchy of course.

  18. #18
    Senior Member jaxgtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    My Bikes
    Cannondale SuperSix, Raliegh Record Ace, Trek 7300
    Posts
    3,834
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Crunchy
    Brian | 2013 Cannondale SuperSix 5 | 2003 Trek 7300 | 2011 Raleigh Record Ace - Steel is real
    Quote Originally Posted by AEO View Post
    you should learn to embrace change, and mock it's failings every step of the way.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Lamplight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    2,706
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Smooth. I don't want to eat a peanut sandwich.

  20. #20
    Gorntastic! v1k1ng1001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    United States of Mexico
    Posts
    3,428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by x136 View Post
    There is only smooth. If I wanted to eat peanuts, I would.

  21. #21
    Hazardous Taerom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Quarantine
    My Bikes
    2005 Trek Liquid 55, 2009 Haro Mary SS
    Posts
    727
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by x136 View Post
    There is only smooth. If I wanted to eat peanuts, I would.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
    Smooth. I don't want to eat a peanut sandwich.
    Quote Originally Posted by v1k1ng1001 View Post
    You people make me sick.

  22. #22
    Senior Member chinotex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Houston, TX
    My Bikes
    2007 Trek 1500
    Posts
    663
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gbcb View Post
    Wrote this recently -- seems appropriate to post it here :

    I'm a big fan of China's many regional cuisines, which provide a nearly endless array of mouth-watering dishes: solid, proletarian Beijing dumplings, grilled lamb skewers from Muslim western China, delicately steamed fish from Hong Kong, sweet Shanghainese "red-cooked" pork, fantastic green vegetables from just about everywhere, and, my favourite, the exquisite "numb-spicy" dishes of Sichuan.

    But sometimes, I just really need a peanut butter sandwich.

    China's cuisine is many things, but every so often it will come up short, and a craving for a peanut butter sandwich is one that Chinese food is particularly ill-equipped to satisfy. Firstly, there's the problem of the bread. "Western-style" bread in China, as in perhaps every Asian country other than Vietnam, is at best a weak approximation of the concept. It is as if bakers have tried to reverse-engineer recipes from photographs of foreign loaves, without ever having tasted them. The result is bread that looks fantastic, but has the consistency and flavour of an old bath sponge. My current preferred brand is a step above most, but still makes my teeth squeak when I eat it.

    Peanut butter, thankfully, is an area in which China excels. In addition to a wide range of local brands, international p-b giant Skippy is well-established here, and its products both smooth and crunchy can be found in many local supermarkets. This, however, is where the story gets interesting.

    At first glance, China's busy supermarkets are visions of plenty. Behind their shiny exteriors, however, is a re-stocking system that could generously be called "spotty". I still remember the day that my neighbourhood supermarket in Beijing simply stopped selling bacon. There was no explanation: it was as if it had never existed. I was disappointed, but took it in stride. Then, suddenly, the peanut butter disappeared.

    Assuming it had been relocated in one of the supermarket's pointless bi-monthly reorganizations, I asked the store manager where I could find it.

    "We don't have it any more," he said.

    Worried, I continued: would they be getting more?

    "We might get more, but we might not. I don't know."

    And just like that, the peanut butter was gone, its place taken by a random selection of salted plums and something called meat floss. The next few days went by in a blur as the cold reality of life without peanut butter sank in.

    When I saw peanut butter back on the shelves a week later, I was euphoric. That feeling came crashing down a moment later as I discovered that the variety on offer was a pirated version of Skippy. Now, I can understand a pirated handbag or coat, but I draw the line at knowingly eating knock-off food products especially when each jar of supposedly identical peanut butter had its own distinct hue.

    The Skippy did eventually return, but I had learned my lesson: I began stockpiling peanut butter in anticipation of the next shortage.

    When I moved to Shanghai, I was dazzled. For the first few months after my arrival, I couldn't stop talking about my supermarket. Forget peanut butter hell, it had balsamic vinegar!

    How quickly the lessons of the past are forgotten.

    By this time, my tastes in sandwiches had expanded, and I was venturing into recreational mayonnaise use. I thought I could stop any time. Little did I know I would be forced to quit cold turkey when it vanished from even the fancy foreign supermarkets.

    What had happened? Who was to blame? How could an entire city of 19 million people suddenly run out of mayonnaise?

    I pondered these questions for weeks, unable to find an answer.

    And, just as suddenly as it had disappeared, the mayonnaise was back.

    And what mayonnaise! The old standbys like Kraft were there, to be sure, but there was so much more. German brands I had no hope of pronouncing filled the shelves, their contents held suggestively within flexible tubes rather than the familiar, rigid jars. Light mayonnaise, "real" mayonnaise, spiced mayonnaise it was all there.

    I grabbed a selection and headed for the cashier. Standing in line was a friend of mine, his shopping basket filled with two dozen cans of tomato sauce, his eyes filled with a triumphant gleam. We nodded at each other knowingly for today, at least, we were both victorious.
    Somehow, amazingly, this post made me miss China. It's the small things like this that make my time there really memorable. These are the stories worth telling. Thanks!

  23. #23
    Not so fast
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by glenng View Post
    Grew up on it so I`m a PB authority. Crunchy FTW. Krunky close 2nd
    Smooth, crunchy...but, krunky?

    You can now get krazy ass drunk on pb and j?

  24. #24
    Wish I was Ocean Size... Go_Fast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Manhattan Beach
    My Bikes
    Leader LD-736R, Motobecane Immortal Pro, Mercier Fixed Gear
    Posts
    1,088
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    smooth - it spreads easier on the female body...

  25. #25
    J3L 2404 gbcb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Shanghai
    My Bikes
    2007 Jamis Nova
    Posts
    1,069
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by markhr View Post
    That's funny - biggest problem in the UK is companies like Green&Blacks, Ben&Jerry, etc., being bought out and immediately changing recipes and ingredients. Bang went my supply of decent ice cream and chocolate hazelnut spread.

    When I lived in a 3rd world country, supermarkets would sometimes stock production over-runs of export food. While China isn't 3rd world could it be occasional excess stock manufactured and bottled in China?
    Hmm... could be. I'm pretty sure the peanut butter is made here, but the mayonnaise is definitely imported. But yeah, it sucks when your favourite treat suddenly changes or disappears!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •