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Jerseysbest 07-17-08 06:28 AM

How loyal are you to your employer?
 
Would you change jobs simply for more money? Do you use sick days for days you aren't 'sick'?

Or are you a boy scout and would only change jobs if it presented a significantly better opportunity?

Where do you draw the line on loyalty?

vtjim 07-17-08 06:42 AM

I get pretty good benefits and lots of time off, so leaving for a job with more money would have to involve a pretty significant raise. Nor do I fake being sick. (Only taken 4 or 5 sick days in 11 years!)

I'm as loyal to them as they are to me. :) They pay me a salary to work 40 hours a week, give or take. As long as they don't start assuming I should work 50, 60, or more hours for the same pay, we'll get along fine.

crash66 07-17-08 07:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerseysbest (Post 7077188)
Would you change jobs simply for more money? Do you use sick days for days you aren't 'sick'?

Or are you a boy scout and would only change jobs if it presented a significantly better opportunity?

Where do you draw the line on loyalty?

There is no such thing as loyalty on the part of a corporation to any single employee. It is simply an arrangement, and the minute the company feels that the arrangement is no longer to their liking, they will change it. Therefore, I've never treated my relationship as anything more than that. I get paid to do a job, the company is not my friend. I may have friends among fellow employees, but it's simply because we spend so much time together. I owe the company nothing more than to do the job they are paying me to do. And if that requires a "mental health day" once in a while, to keep me from getting burned out, then so be it. That's why most companies now call them Personal Time Off days, instead of Sick Days.

Just because a company has treated you well doesn't mean it's treating YOU well. You are an asset, nothing more, nothing less. They want their investment to pay off for them. The net effect will always be in their favor.

When's the last time you read that any large company's CEO was taking massive pay cut so they wouldn't have to fire a bunch of 40-year employees?

Psydotek 07-17-08 08:15 AM

I'd work for someone else in a heartbeat if it offered me the opportunity to do teaching and research along with my regular cytology work regardless of pay (as long as it's comprable to what i'm making now which is already on the low end of the cytotech pay range). I'd actually even be willing to take a slightly lower paying job as long as the work was better, just don't tell the prospective employers that. :D

Spreggy 07-17-08 08:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerseysbest (Post 7077188)
Would you change jobs simply for more money? Do you use sick days for days you aren't 'sick'?

Or are you a boy scout and would only change jobs if it presented
a significantly better opportunity?

What is the difference?

As for days off, I just take what I want, it's a fairly autonomous position.

artifice 07-17-08 08:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerseysbest (Post 7077188)
Would you change jobs simply for more money? Do you use sick days for days you aren't 'sick'?

Or are you a boy scout and would only change jobs if it presented a significantly better opportunity?

Where do you draw the line on loyalty?

possibly
no
yes
...the last one's a toughie. They're pretty good tome so I try to make sure if/when the better opportunity/more money might come along, I'm able to help them fill my shoes.

Tom Stormcrowe 07-17-08 08:30 AM

Fact: Your employer is only as loyal to you as you are productive to them. You can be replaced at any time and most jobs aren't secure, really at the core.

If you can get better benefits, money, etc, then yeah, I'd at least take a serious look. Look at the tradeoffs. There is no such thing as "Lifetime Employment" anymore.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerseysbest (Post 7077188)
Would you change jobs simply for more money? Do you use sick days for days you aren't 'sick'?

Or are you a boy scout and would only change jobs if it presented a significantly better opportunity?

Where do you draw the line on loyalty?


Jerseysbest 07-17-08 08:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Spreggy (Post 7077839)
What is the difference?

As for days off, I just take what I want, it's a fairly autonomous position.

More money means getting paid more for doing the same job.

A better opportunity, as I see it, means advancement or at least the opportunity to grow with the company, or better conditions, or whatever it may mean to you. Might mean simpler job, or something that taps into more of your skill set, there by 'full filling' yourself more or some BS liek that.

Saint 07-17-08 08:46 AM

I am loyal to who I work for, but above all my family comes first. If an opportunity arises that better benefits and pay are an option, I will take it to better the quality life for my family, and in many cases without regard for my own personal feelings.

MrCrassic 07-17-08 08:58 AM

When I worked in finance in Midtown, I initially had a lot of loyalty to my employer. That quickly fleeted when I moved to another position inside of that same firm.

Now that I work in a great pharma company (working from home and a day off every two weeks = WIN, for starters), I have a lot of loyalty to my employer and my managers/team leads. They could have treated me like an intern (actually a co-op, but to most it's the same thing) and give me insignificant work, but they actually give me work that has impact (at least somewhere). I can't ask for more.

donnamb 07-17-08 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vtjim (Post 7077253)
I get pretty good benefits and lots of time off, so leaving for a job with more money would have to involve a pretty significant raise. Nor do I fake being sick. (Only taken 4 or 5 sick days in 11 years!)

I'm as loyal to them as they are to me. :) They pay me a salary to work 40 hours a week, give or take. As long as they don't start assuming I should work 50, 60, or more hours for the same pay, we'll get along fine.

I feel pretty much the same way. I'm good at my job and give it 100%. They've been incredibly understanding of my health problems. I respect the honesty and integrity of the nonprofit I work for. It's not perfect, but I can live with the kind of dysfunction present there.

It would have to be a pretty big pay hike for me to leave.

trsidn 07-17-08 09:13 AM

Loyalty only goes so far.
I have been laid off before. I have changed jobs several times for more money. Twice for SIGNIFICANTLY more money, and once because I didn't see much future for me there.

Many times, the only way to get a pay raise is to change. I could probably leave for more money right now, but I work close to home, and am fairly autonomous. I rather like it here. But things are always subject to change.

avmanansala 07-17-08 09:17 AM

(Putting on my flame retardant suit...) I work for a state agency. I get paid a good salary, more than most non-licensed professionals in my field make; almost what a licensed professional makes. My employer will reimburse me for my license one I complete the last part of it and will pay to renew my license. When I get licensed, I will make significantly more money than I do now with little change in responsibilities. I work an alternate work schedule (9/80 schedule). I have a great benefits package (medical, dental, vision, retirement...) My boss actually helps me get my projects done. In return, I don't abuse the vacation/sick hours, and most importantly, I get to spend time with my family.

Not all state employees are slackers or hacks. Many work hard at what they do and many care about the quality of work that they do. Such is the case in my office...sure there are slackers but they exist in any job/profession.

crash66 07-17-08 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by donnamb (Post 7078177)
I feel pretty much the same way. I'm good at my job and give it 100%. They've been incredibly understanding of my health problems. I respect the honesty and integrity of the nonprofit I work for. It's not perfect, but I can live with the kind of dysfunction present there.

It would have to be a pretty big pay hike for me to leave.


Lucky for you. I was fired because of mine.

Like I said--what loyalty?

aprilm 07-17-08 09:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jerseysbest (Post 7077188)
Where do you draw the line on loyalty?

No matter what job I have, I very rarely call in sick. I'm not loyal at all to my current job, and I'm currently looking for other opportunities. I was very loyal to my last employer until the last few months.

x136 07-17-08 09:49 AM

I don't see much point in being "loyal" to a corporation, be it from a consumer standpoint, or as an employee. In either case, the corporation doesn't care about you. Despite what the law says, the corporation is not a person.

Also, my vacation and sick days are lumped under "paid time off", so I don't have to fake sick if I want to take a day off.

If I were to find a better opportunity, the fact that I like my co-workers would be about the only thing that might give me pause.

ilikebikes 07-17-08 09:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crash66 (Post 7077562)
There is no such thing as loyalty on the part of a corporation to any single employee. It is simply an arrangement, and the minute the company feels that the arrangement is no longer to their liking, they will change it. Therefore, I've never treated my relationship as anything more than that. I get paid to do a job, the company is not my friend. I may have friends among fellow employees, but it's simply because we spend so much time together. I owe the company nothing more than to do the job they are paying me to do. And if that requires a "mental health day" once in a while, to keep me from getting burned out, then so be it. That's why most companies now call them Personal Time Off days, instead of Sick Days.

Just because a company has treated you well doesn't mean it's treating YOU well. You are an asset, nothing more, nothing less. They want their investment to pay off for them. The net effect will always be in their favor.

When's the last time you read that any large company's CEO was taking massive pay cut so they wouldn't have to fire a bunch of 40-year employees?

+1000! ;) I used to change jobs in a heart beat for more money! Doesnt matter what anyone might think, its whats needed in this world to survive. Without it one cant buy food, pay bills, raise children, you name anything materialistic that you want and you will not be able to get it without money! Those who say money isnt everything are the ones that already have a lot of it :lol:

HardyWeinberg 07-17-08 10:36 AM

I am very loyal to my current employer. There are related gigs that could pay more and allow for more advancement but there would be other sacrifices.

StanSeven 07-17-08 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by crash66 (Post 7077562)
There is no such thing as loyalty on the part of a corporation to any single employee. It is simply an arrangement, and the minute the company feels that the arrangement is no longer to their liking, they will change it. Therefore, I've never treated my relationship as anything more than that. I get paid to do a job, the company is not my friend. I may have friends among fellow employees, but it's simply because we spend so much time together. I owe the company nothing more than to do the job they are paying me to do. And if that requires a "mental health day" once in a while, to keep me from getting burned out, then so be it. That's why most companies now call them Personal Time Off days, instead of Sick Days.

Just because a company has treated you well doesn't mean it's treating YOU well. You are an asset, nothing more, nothing less. They want their investment to pay off for them. The net effect will always be in their favor.

When's the last time you read that any large company's CEO was taking massive pay cut so they wouldn't have to fire a bunch of 40-year employees?

That isn't true. You just haven't worked at the right place. The company I work for is rated as one of the best places locally. It truely treats employees as "family" and provides execptional benefits. It also is very careful in hiring to ensure potential candidates fit in. It looks for people that are willing and enthusistic to do, learn, and grow. It also looks for people with the same passion as everyone else. We work hard but have a good time doing it. Also we are rewarded very well financially but rather large bonuses when the company does well.

monogodo 07-17-08 10:53 AM

Would you change jobs simply for more money? Depends on the job, how much more money, and the job location.

Do you use sick days for days you aren't 'sick'? Yes, but both my boss and I view "mental health days" as legitimate usage of sick time.

Or are you a boy scout and would only change jobs if it presented a significantly better opportunity? I'd call my boss and explain that I'd received another offer, and see what she had to say. She wouldn't necessarily have to match or beat the other offer, since I've got other benefits working here that can't be measured financially.

Where do you draw the line on loyalty? So long as I'm happy doing what I'm doing, where I'm doing it, with whom I do it, and can afford to live the way I want to live, I'll keep working here. I know I could find a job that pays more than what I'm getting, but it might not be as good a work environment as the one I'm in now. I currently walk 2 blocks to work. In 2 weeks I'll be moving to a new loft and will be walking 3.5 blocks to work. I get to go home for lunch. My supervisor clocks me in on time whether I'm there or not. I can surf the internet on a T3 connection with no repercussions. I can print things out to my heart's content. I get two profit sharing bonuses a year, as well as a Holiday bonus in December. It would take a significant pay increase to get me to jump ship. How much of an increase? Well, my wife is going to start working for my boss in August. She accepted the position for $12k less per year than a law firm closer to home was offering her to do "heavy Excel work". She knows my boss (we were at her wedding), and knows that the position she's taking is the first step on an almost unlimited career path, whereas the law firm job would be at about the middle of an Admin career path. She doesn't want to be an admin for the rest of her life. She's willing to make less in the short term for a better potential future. I'm the same way.

trsidn 07-17-08 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by StanSeven (Post 7079053)
That isn't true. You just haven't worked at the right place. The company I work for is rated as one of the best places locally. It truely treats employees as "family" and provides execptional benefits. It also is very careful in hiring to ensure potential candidates fit in. It looks for people that are willing and enthusistic to do, learn, and grow. It also looks for people with the same passion as everyone else. We work hard but have a good time doing it. Also we are rewarded very well financially but rather large bonuses when the company does well.

cool.

For the record, I have never seen an engineering firm give bonuses to the grunts doing the work.
Course, rally can't expect much in the way of bonuses when everything is done low-bid.

jsharr 07-17-08 10:56 AM

I threw myself on a hand grenade for my employer this morning.

Oh, by hand grenade, I mean sausage, egg and cheese croissant.

And by throw, I mean eat.

And by for my employer, I mean it was on company time

I take solace in the fact that they would do the same for me.

trsidn 07-17-08 10:56 AM

*snort*

:lol:

ken cummings 07-17-08 11:37 AM

In all my years I've only had two employers that showed formal, organized loyalty to their employees. The US Army and a foreign mining conglomerate. In return for which they expected absolute loyalty for life in return. In the present day of "At Will" hiring you are legally no more then an economic unit. If the specific task you are hired for is finished, often, so are you. I have seen little effort made to improve your usefulness to the company or to retrain you so they can keep you on. There may be individuals in the Company who are nice but they are powerless to help you. My last employer flat out refused to tell me what I could do to improve my chances of being kept on or improving my benefits. Six weeks later I found that they had already selected my replacement. Some loyalty.

end rant.

SingingSabre 07-17-08 11:54 AM

I'm as loyal to my company as they are to me. The second they turn, so shall I.


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