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  1. #1
    Banned. timmyquest's Avatar
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    Consulting firm directory?

    I'm looking to get into some entry level jobs in a couple of careers that i think i would enjoy. One of which is consulting, as well as something with a marketing firm. At an interview with a marketing firm the PR lady suggested to me the Red Book which is a directly for marketing firms and it has been a great help to me but i don't know of anything for consulting firms. Does BF.net know of anything like this?

  2. #2
    Fax Transport Specialist black_box's Avatar
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    how do you define 'consulting'? marketing, software, financial, business management, etc? what skillsets are you looking to use?

  3. #3
    Banned. timmyquest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by black_box View Post
    how do you define 'consulting'? marketing, software, financial, business management, etc? what skillsets are you looking to use?
    This is part of the problem in that it is such a diverse field.

    My view of consulting is a company that seeks to assist another company with whatever "problem" they may be having or wish to avoid. Certainly marketing falls under this but in the context of this thread i'm not really looking towards advertising so much as, well to use your examples, financial consulting (though i have no education here and so i'm not sure who would take me on in such an environment) or a sort of "business management" company. Here i think my skills as a communicator, both orally and written, and my study of human behavior, influence, and motivation could come in handy.

    This is the same way i sell myself to marketing firms. (Contrary to popular belief through my activities on this forum) I view myself as a personable individual who is good at reading people (i come to this conclusion based on what elders have told me of myself, my interaction with friends parents, and my ability to sell myself and my products through my business which sells photographs), enabling me to understand where they are coming from, what they need, why they need it and in turn i feel this would allow me to come up with a plan to execute a solution to their problem .

    I admit i don't know much about consulting but it is something i'm interested in and would love to learn, which is why i'm willing to be a mailroom clerk...sorta

  4. #4
    Fax Transport Specialist black_box's Avatar
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    People skills are definitely a plus. I would say effective communication also requires the technical background to understand the problem. I'd be ******** trying to talk to someone about biology or business plans, but computers, software, etc. and its no problem. Usually that background comes from a college degree, but may not be necessary. consulting in my mind usually requires understanding the problem as you said, but then also implementing a customized solution, not just using off-the-shelf pieces. maybe i'm off here, I'm not a consultant but have done some freelance software development in the past. From my first reading of this extra info, is it a corporate sales job you're looking for? my brother-in-law has had two solid jobs in that field (corporate software) and doesn't have a technical degree. He is a "people person" though.

  5. #5
    pluralis majestatis redfooj's Avatar
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    A shepherd was herding his flock in a remote pasture when suddenly a brand
    new BMW X6 popped over a hill and towards him. The driver, a
    young man in a Brioni suit, Gucci shoes, Ray Ban sunglasses and a Boss tie
    leaned out of the window and asked the shepherd: "Hey, if I tell you exactly how many sheep you have in your flock, will you give me one?"

    The shepherd looks at the guy, then at his peacefully grazing flock and
    calmly answers "sure".

    The guy hops out of his car, whips out his PC, opens up a database and 60
    Excel spreadsheets with complex macros. He looks over the sheep and the land, and finally creates a 150 page PowerPoint report, turns to the shepherd and says: "You have exactly 1586 sheep!"

    "That is correct, take one of the sheep" says the shepherd. He watches the
    young man select one of the animals and put it in his BMW. Then the
    shepherd says: "If I can tell you exactly what your business is, will you give
    me my sheep back?"

    "Okay, why not" answers the young man.

    "You are a consultant" says the shepherd.

    "That is correct" says the young man, "I work for Anderson. How did you guess that?"

    "Easy" answers the shepherd. "You turn up here although nobody called you.
    You want to be paid for the answer to a question I already knew. And you
    don't know **** about my business because you took my dog."

  6. #6
    pluralis majestatis redfooj's Avatar
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    Last week, we took some friends to a new restaurant, 'Steve's Place,' and noticed that the waiter who took our order carried a spoon in his shirt pocket.
    It seemed a little strange.
    When the busboy brought our water and utensils, I observed that he also had a spoon in his shirt pocket.
    Then I looked around and saw that all the staff had spoons in their pockets.
    When the waiter came back to serve our soup I inquired,
    'Why the spoon?''
    'Well, 'he explained, 'the restaurant's owner hired Andersen Consulting to revamp all of our processes.
    After several months of analysis, they concluded that the spoon was the most frequently dropped utensil.
    It represents a drop frequency of approximately 3 spoons per table per hour.
    If our personnel are better prepared, we can reduce the number of trips back to the kitchen and save 15 man-hours per shift.'
    As luck would have it, I dropped my spoon and he replaced it with his spare.
    'I'll get another spoon next time I go to the kitchen instead of making an extra trip to get it right now.'
    I was impressed.
    I also noticed that there was a string hanging out of the waiter's fly.
    Looking around, I saw that all of the waiters had the same string hanging from their flies.
    So, before he walked off, I asked the waiter, 'Excuse me, but can you tell me why you have that string right there?'
    'Oh, certainly!' Then he lowered his voice.
    'Not everyone is so observant.
    That consulting firm I mentioned also learned that we can save time in the restroom.
    By tying this string to the tip of our you-know-what, we can pull it out without touching it and eliminate the need to wash our hands, shortening the time spent in the restroom by 76.39%.
    I asked quietly, 'After you get it out, how do you put it back?'
    'Well,' he whispered, 'I don't know about the others, but I use the spoon.'

  7. #7
    Banned. timmyquest's Avatar
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    Fortunately i have no desire to drive a BMW and wear raybans...though i do have a pair, but they were given to me

  8. #8
    Squirrelly Member trsidn's Avatar
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    You can be a 'consultant' in almost any field. You need to pin the fields down.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Yet more proof that I'm.. well, pretty much right about everything.

  9. #9
    Banned. timmyquest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trsidn View Post
    You can be a 'consultant' in almost any field. You need to pin the fields down.
    Fair enough. I honestly have no preference i guess. One of the main reasons for going for a liberal arts degree is that i'm curious about a ton of things. In high school i was an outside linebacker who built his own computers after practice. I love working on my dads '69 Torino before going out to take "beautiful nature photographs". Watching some MMA before a bike ride gets the adrenalin pumping. I listen to astronomy and consumer tech podcasts before going to bed, upon waking up i try to catch up on business and the economy. My friends are always poking fun at me because i have too many hobbies but the truth is that most feel i'm a well rounded and open minded guy. So, if i were to pursue such a career it would be difficult for me to track down a single line of work that i would prefer over another.

    This is kind of why i'm looking for a sort of directory because i would pursue a company not so much because of their line of work but because of the company itself.

  10. #10
    Squirrelly Member trsidn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by timmyquest View Post

    This is kind of why i'm looking for a sort of directory because i would pursue a company not so much because of their line of work but because of the company itself.
    Also fair enough, but if you are labeled "consultant", the client will be paying the big bucks for 'expert advice'. So it better be something you really know(and hopefully enjoy). And coming out of school, you probably should find the field that handles issues that interest you the most, which is where you are likely to learn the most.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    Yet more proof that I'm.. well, pretty much right about everything.

  11. #11
    Banned. timmyquest's Avatar
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    A very good point...

    Thanks for the insight.

  12. #12
    Fax Transport Specialist black_box's Avatar
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    Lots of interests is good, easier to find a job that you're happy with (and this is important for your sanity). how many of them can you know well enough that people will pay you for your knowledge and skills? supply vs. demand will be a factor here, who are you competing against and who's paying your bill?

  13. #13
    pluralis majestatis redfooj's Avatar
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    glassdoor.com

    good site. doesnt answer your question but i think youll like it

  14. #14
    T-Shirt Guy ehidle's Avatar
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    Consulting is good to get into, but as another poster said, the clients are paying the big bucks for someone who knows the problem inside and out, and there is no way that is you right now. I've been in technology and engineering consulting for a decade and I still find myself doing research 80% of the time. Problems are always new and different and it's much more important that you be able to find the answer to any problem thrown at you than anything else. That means knowing the right people, the right resources, and the right methods for gathering pertinent information about the problem you're trying to solve. These things take time.

    You'll likely be able to get a very entry-level position with a consulting firm, but be prepared to work very long hours, travel constantly, and make very little money for the first several years. You'll have to be able to demonstrate a high level of competence in a field in a short period of time in order to stay with whichever firm hires you.

    At the end of the day, you need to be able to make yourself an expert in just about any subject in two weeks or less. If I were to walk up to you on the street and say: I need a solution for aircraft that solves the problem of premature incandescent element failure in taxi and landing lights: you need to be able to make yourself an expert in the bleeding edge technology surrounding aircraft lighting systems and novel alternatives to the status quo in time for the first program meeting.

    If you think you can handle stuff like that that, more power to you
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