Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-19-08, 01:30 PM   #1
Ted Danson
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Ted Danson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes:
Posts: 377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Question about stopping disk brake squeeks

I have determined that the reason disk brakes squeak so loud is because the vibration is not dampened ever. It goes straight from the rotor to the hub. Metal on metal. The brake assemble itself goes straight to the frame. Metal on metal.

If you were to use a tough rubber washer, or even nylon and put them in between the rotor and the hub. As well as in between the brake assembly and the frame; wouldn't this stop most of the vibration in turn stopping most of the noise being distributed?

Please prove me wrong otherwise I'm going to go buy some nylon washers.

Thanks
__________________
Merton Enthusiast
Ted Danson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-08, 01:33 PM   #2
fuzzbox
Your imaginary friend.
 
fuzzbox's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Wandering aimlessly.
Bikes: A sweet Quamen ATL custom, GT Mach 2
Posts: 2,210
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Why is this in foo?
__________________

Every passing minute is another chance to turn it all around.
fuzzbox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-08, 01:34 PM   #3
Ted Danson
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Ted Danson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes:
Posts: 377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cuz I only trust my foosters. And there's enough disk brake forums in the mtb section.
__________________
Merton Enthusiast
Ted Danson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-08, 02:23 PM   #4
AEO
Senior Member
 
AEO's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: A Coffin Called Earth. or Toronto, ON
Bikes: Bianchi, Miyata, Dahon, Rossin
Posts: 12,258
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
mechanics man, mechanics.
__________________
Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm
AEO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-08, 02:54 PM   #5
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 11,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Having soft materials in the system would cause your brakes to work differently. It will feel soft and modulation would be more difficult due to the sponginess. Best to design it to not create the vibration and resonances to begin with. Some better designs are dual-piston or even quad-piston calipers with the larger piston in the trailing position. On dual-piston designs, you want to offset the location where it squeezes to be more towards the trailing edge of the pads.

And yes, floating rotors do help as well. But you want them to float within rigid boundaries. Notice the buttons that hold the rotor onto the carrier are actually wider than the rotor itself, which have about 1mm of room to wiggle:


Last edited by DannoXYZ; 10-19-08 at 03:03 PM.
DannoXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-08, 03:03 PM   #6
Ted Danson
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Ted Danson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes:
Posts: 377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Define a rigid boundary please.
__________________
Merton Enthusiast
Ted Danson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-08, 03:12 PM   #7
DannoXYZ 
Senior Member
 
DannoXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Saratoga, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 11,600
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
They can float as necessary with virtually no force needed. But once they encounter the boundary of their travel, ZERO movement beyond that edge is possible. On the picture above, there's actually movement possible in the radial and axial planes. When cold you can hold the disc and wiggle it around and it feels like there's nothing holding it on at all. Once it's warmed up, the radial play disappears, but the axial-play is still there to allow for self-centering between the pads.

If you're talking about bicycle brakes squealing, they have a long way to go in development. They're actually backwards right now. The early motorycle brakes had rigidly attached discs with floating calipers. That doesn't work anywhere nearly as well and as quietly as a rigidly bolted down caliper with floating disc.

Last edited by DannoXYZ; 10-19-08 at 03:16 PM.
DannoXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:14 AM.