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  1. #1
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    take microeconomics over summer?

    I have a bit of a predicament here, a nerdy predicament. I really want to take intermediate microeconomics over the summer, and was fully prepared to do this at UNH, which is located just a few miles from my house. This will be accepted as transfer credit by my college as an intermediate microeconomics class. The -- potential -- problem: the professor at UNH has intimated to me that calculus is not needed for the course. The textbook used is Jeffrey Perloff's Microeconomics.
    The reason I see this as a potential problem is that all intermediate economic courses at my college are fully calculus based, requiring completion of calc 1 at a minimum prior to entry. The book we use here is Jeffrey Perloff's Microeconomics with Calculus Honestly, I've already helped people in this class here with their homework, and the calc looks like optimization problems, though I'm sure it's part of the explanations as well.

    So here we go. Do I take the summer course, omitting the calculus part of economics, which in my opinion is huge? My fear is that any advanced courses I take at my college in the future will expect knowledge of the calc-based economics taught here.

    Would it be more prudent of me to take microeconomics here at the college? Or will the absence of calc have no bearing on my understanding of microeconomics and future courses? Thoughts?
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  2. #2
    I can't find my pants mirona's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomcow2 View Post
    I have a bit of a predicament here, a nerdy predicament. I really want to take intermediate microeconomics over the summer, and was fully prepared to do this at UNH, which is located just a few miles from my house. This will be accepted as transfer credit by my college as an intermediate microeconomics class. The -- potential -- problem: the professor at UNH has intimated to me that calculus is not needed for the course. The textbook used is Jeffrey Perloff's Microeconomics.
    The reason I see this as a potential problem is that all intermediate economic courses at my college are fully calculus based, requiring completion of calc 1 at a minimum prior to entry. The book we use here is Jeffrey Perloff's Microeconomics with Calculus Honestly, I've already helped people in this class here with their homework, and the calc looks like optimization problems, though I'm sure it's part of the explanations as well.

    So here we go. Do I take the summer course, omitting the calculus part of economics, which in my opinion is huge? My fear is that any advanced courses I take at my college in the future will expect knowledge of the calc-based economics taught here.

    Would it be more prudent of me to take microeconomics here at the college? Or will the absence of calc have no bearing on my understanding of microeconomics and future courses? Thoughts?
    Take it.

  3. #3
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    Take it over the summer?
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  4. #4
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    If you have nothing else lined up, take it. No such thing as a wasted course.

    If you want something else take a modeling course, it will help you with your Econometrics goals.

  5. #5
    Fax Transport Specialist black_box's Avatar
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    I would talk with the professor(s) at your college that teach the more advanced econ courses, which you might be taking later and have this intermediate course as a prerequisite. Maybe you're better off taking Calc I over the summer? If econ is related to your major/minor, I think it'd be better to take it at your college, especially if your college seems to have higher requirements for the same "level" of course.

  6. #6
    Senior Member phantyk's Avatar
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    There is a lot more to economics than calculations. I have taken three economics courses and never used calculus in any of them. Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Money and Banking. I wouldn't worry about it.

  7. #7
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    I spoke to a professor today. She recommended against taking it, saying that her class, which uses calculus extensively, will provide me with a deeper understanding and will help me with more advanced courses. We will be using partial derivatives and lagrangian multipliers in here. She also said that one reason the course is beneficial is that it exposes students to that much more math, beneficial for grad school. I'll take Calc II over the summer instead, as I see this as more of a "course in a can."

    Phantyk - Intermediate micro will be seventh course in economics. So far I have used a tiny bit of calc in intro to micro, a lot more in history of economic thought. I haven't used calc in any of classes though. Though to be honest, I can't really see how intermediate micro can be taught without calculus; marginal means derivative!
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