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  1. #1
    Look! My Spine! RubenX's Avatar
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    A question about police records...

    Lets say your next door neighbor is always playing music very loud. And let's say this has been happening for years. On many occasions you have called the police and while no official fines were given, police reports were filed, documenting the loud music.

    OK, Now let's say you need those reports but can't remember the dates. How can you get them?

    A friend of mine told me there is a report that is like a list of incidents, with the police report number of each incident and a brief description. Every time somebody calls the police on your arse it goes to that report. Or if you call the police on somebody, goes there too. Once you get that report, you can request the specific police reports listed on that one, for more info.

    True? BS? How is it called? How can you get it?

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    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    It depends upon how organized the particular dept. in your town is. Some are quite modernized with computer databases. Others have piles of paper shoved into filing cabinets.

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    Look! My Spine! RubenX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
    It depends upon how organized the particular dept. in your town is. Some are quite modernized with computer databases. Others have piles of paper shoved into filing cabinets.
    Yeah the department in question digitalized everything over a decade ago.

    I made some research and it seems what I'm looking for is the NCIC report. The tricky part now is how can I can a person obtain a copy of his own NCIC report.

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    Super Moderator making's Avatar
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    I had a problem with a neighbor several years ago. The police would print off any report I wanted. For me they did it for addresses and time frames. I think it is public record and all you have to do is ask. Oh yea, I had to pay like $1 or $2 dollars per report.
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    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubenX View Post
    Yeah the department in question digitalized everything over a decade ago.

    I made some research and it seems what I'm looking for is the NCIC report. The tricky part now is how can I can a person obtain a copy of his own NCIC report.
    Methinks that the neighbor in the OP with the loud noise complaints won't be in the NCIC database. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NCIC.
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    jackrussellsonabicycle Airwick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    Methinks that the neighbor in the OP with the loud noise complaints won't be in the NCIC database. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NCIC.
    +1 so very true...

    It's also true that under these "general complaints" it would vary from police department to police department and depends on if the officer actually wrote a report on a complaint.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Michigander's Avatar
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    Send them a written freedom of information request, preferably with a signature certified mailing service of some sort. It's their job to find the stuff and give it to you. Government agencies often shaft people illegally with these requests, but by law they are supposed to give you whatever public information you want.

    It may cost you something like 100-200 dollars to get all of the reports, but they should be available. Also, soon after you make a report, you can get the audio from the officers microphone, provided that they actually went and talked to the neighbor. PD's usually get rid of their audio after 2-6 weeks, depending on their policy.

    The way to do this is with a simple memo, asking for all available relevant notation or documentation recorded on any medium that pertains to complaints by you about the particular residents of the house with the loud music. Or similar words to that extent.

    If you keep doing this after the first one, as in FOIA the results of each and every complaint, it should only cost you 5-15 dollars for each request. If I wanted to piss the police off, and get them to take action, this is how I would pester them. Of course, it may only make them more mad and get them to do nothing for sure, but that's where you're at now.
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  9. #9
    175mm crank of love RichinPeoria's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubenX View Post
    Lets say your next door neighbor is always playing music very loud. And let's say this has been happening for years. On many occasions you have called the police and while no official fines were given, police reports were filed, documenting the loud music.

    OK, Now let's say you need those reports but can't remember the dates. How can you get them?

    A friend of mine told me there is a report that is like a list of incidents, with the police report number of each incident and a brief description. Every time somebody calls the police on your arse it goes to that report. Or if you call the police on somebody, goes there too. Once you get that report, you can request the specific police reports listed on that one, for more info.

    True? BS? How is it called? How can you get it?
    In Detroit, as the place went to hell and people abandoned their unsaleable homes, then those homes became crack houses etc. It was quite common for someone from a home near by that was irritated by the problem and lack of police action solving those problems, to tape a road flare to a 5 gallon plastic gasoline can and leave it in said home after igniting the flare. Many problem homes in Detroit were "fixed" that way. Just dumping buckets of gasoline worked well too even if less sofisticated. There are risks associated with this approach.

    Two Angry Neighbors Burn Out a Nest of Crack Dealers, but Now They're in Big Trouble Themselves

    By Dan Chu, Maria Leonhauser

    Residents along the 12000 block of Barlow Street in Detroit prided themselves on their neighborliness. Children played freely in the streets while their elders sat on porches in summertime discussing the day's weather or the Tigers' hopes of a pennant. Still, there was no denying that the racially integrated area was in decline, its modest brick-and-shingle homes fighting a losing battle against vandalism, drugs and decay. Prostitutes had begun to walk the streets and, worse, pushers had taken over some abandoned homes to sell the potent form of cocaine known as crack.

    Angelo "Butch" Parisi, 28, lived two doors from one such house with his girlfriend, Vicki, 25, and their two children. Across the street lived Perry Kent, 30, with his wife, Dawn, 26, and their three children. Both Parisi, an exconvict, and Kent are unemployed. They had no money to move, to flee the drug plague that had arrived at their doorstep.

    They insist that when neighbors called the police to complain, nothing happened. "Anytime the police drove down the street, the crack dealers were gone," says Butch. Thus, to protect their families, Parisi and Kent took matters into their own hands: They set fire to the house the dealers were using, reducing it to a charred ruin. Most of their neighbors applauded them; the police, however, did not. Charged with two counts of arson each, Parisi and Kent face trial later this year, and, if convicted, up to 20 years in prison.

    Until late last summer, the house at 12077 Barlow Street had been rented by Rocco Tatarelli, 31, and his sister Kelly, 27. "That place was falling apart. My sister and I left because we found a better, cheaper place," says Tatarelli, who moved two houses down the street. "I had the utilities shut off, but then we started seeing these young guys in the empty house. They managed to turn the utilities back on. But even so, nobody really worried until lots of traffic started. Then it became obvious. Crack was being sold."

    "That crack house was like a fast-food restaurant," says Butch Parisi. "They put up a basketball net out front. A car would stop, they'd do some business, and then they'd turn back to playing basketball. They didn't even try to hide it. Sometimes the dealer would stand out on the porch or in the backyard and shoot his ****** into the air." Confirms Robert Firmstone, another Barlow Street resident: "I could look out the back window at just about any time and see young kids in the alley. They'd run into the house for a couple of minutes and then out again. You could hear the squeal of car wheels at 3 or 4 a.m."

    By October the neighborhood's fear of violence was palpable. "I was standing outside with Dawn's and my kids when I saw these punks coming down the street," Vicki recalls. "One had a shotgun hanging out from under his trench coat. The others had their hands under their coats like they were holding guns. I grabbed the kids as fast as I could and pushed them into the house." Other neighbors saw what was happening, too, and watched in horror as one of the thugs fired a shot into the air before departing.

    With an equal measure of desperation and defiance, Parisi and Kent decided to act. The next day they marched on 12077 Barlow carrying a bucket of gasoline. "Two guys were on the porch," Parisi remembers. "We told them we didn't want them doing business here. One of them laughed at us. I hopped onto the porch with the bucket and poured out some of the gas. The dealer said, 'What are you doing?' 'This,' I said, and tossed a lit match on the porch."

    Parisi and Kent insist they were only delivering a get-lost message, and for a time they thought their point had been made. After the fire department extinguished the blaze—"It wasn't big enough to really damage the place," says Kent—the house was boarded up. "We figured that was the end of it," says Parisi. "We were wrong."

    Working from the back and side doors of the empty house, the dealer was soon doing "business as usual, busy as usual," says Kent. At that point Kent and Parisi began planning for the next windless night. On Nov. 15, it arrived. "It was dark, and everyone was off the street," says Parisi. "We didn't want nobody hurt. We went through the house to make sure no one was there. Then we poured gas on the first floor, went outside, lit a piece of paper and tossed it through a broken window. The fire company came. Neighbors were on their porches. Many of them said, 'Yeah, it's about time.' "

    A month later, according to Parisi's lawyer, David Steingold, arson investigators came into the neighborhood on an unrelated matter and noticed the burned-out house for the first time. "They questioned my client, who was told that he wasn't going to get into trouble," says Steingold. "They just wanted the fires stopped. Parisi told them about the crack house, the gunplay and why he burned down the house. The investigators left."

    Three weeks after that, Parisi and Kent were arrested and charged with burning real property. Parisi also faces two counts of obstruction of justice for threatening two of the acquaintances of the alleged crack dealer, both of whom live nearby. ("That's crazy. I've already admitted I burned the house, so why would I threaten anyone?" he asks.) Meanwhile, Parisi and Kent have launched a Save Barlow Street Defense Fund to help pay their legal fees. "I didn't approve of what they did," says Tatarelli, the house's former occupant. "But I didn't lose any sleep over it."

    Neither have others in similarly besieged neighborhoods. When the Detroit Free Press asked its readers whether they felt Kent and Parisi were justified in torching the crack house, 87 percent of 347 respondents said yes. Understandably, police are concerned. "It's anarchy," says Officer Philip Love, who often patrols the area and says that 12077 Barlow had never appeared in police files as a suspected crack house. "What if someone just suspects that a house is a crack house, and he's wrong? Then you burn down an innocent person's home."

    Parisi, who sometimes works as a landscaper, has lived on Barlow Street all his life—except for 3 years in prison on a 1981 armed robbery rap. ("I haven't been in any trouble since," he declares.) Kent came to Barlow Street from Flint, Mich., four years ago to go to mechanics school. He was laid off from his machinist's job in August, and his wife, Dawn, supports the family with her waitressing job at a bowling alley. Both men concede that their desperate act has not restored serenity either to the neighborhood or to their own lives. Their families now spend most of their time together, hiding behind drawn drapes in Parisi's home.

    Fear of reprisal by drug dealers—and rumors that conspiracy charges might be filed against neighbors who helped Parisi and Kent pay for the gasoline—has left the entire street with a sense of foreboding. "This was a nice neighborhood, and on a sunny day like today people would be outside talking, picking up trash, visiting," says Robert Firmstone. "But now what do you see? Nothing." Even in their absence, it seems, the dealers cast a shadow like death on the city.

    —By Dan Chu, with Maria Leonhauser in Detroit


    http://www.people.com/people/archive...098589,00.html
    Last edited by RichinPeoria; 08-29-09 at 02:59 PM.
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  10. #10
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    they will probably cooperate

    I get police reports like this all the time. Just ask for all the offenses and complaints from that address and they will compile a list. They might charge you a few $$ for the copies but by law they have to cough up the info.

    Public info like this is routinely mined and used by private business. Police reports are collected by law firms that do personal injury litigation for example. They look thru them and send out mailers to accident victims and offer their legal services.

  11. #11
    K2ProFlex baby! ilikebikes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubenX View Post
    Lets say your next door neighbor is always playing music very loud. And let's say this has been happening for years. On many occasions you have called the police and while no official fines were given, police reports were filed, documenting the loud music.

    OK, Now let's say you need those reports but can't remember the dates. How can you get them?

    A friend of mine told me there is a report that is like a list of incidents, with the police report number of each incident and a brief description. Every time somebody calls the police on your arse it goes to that report. Or if you call the police on somebody, goes there too. Once you get that report, you can request the specific police reports listed on that one, for more info.

    True? BS? How is it called? How can you get it?
    Don't depend on the Police for anything, there was a death in my area yesterday called in by my immediate next door neighbor, the Police came, Fire Rescue, found the dead guy, left a squad car behind to wait for the coroner, two hours later the coroner shows up, four more squad cars, they haul the body out, sit around doing paper work for another hour, then they all leave.
    A few hours later some random lady shows up knocking at my door, I find out she's knocking at everyones door because her sons missing and shes afriad the dead guy might be him, so I call the Police for her and explain the situation, they tell me they have no repoprt of a dead body being found in the area! Not only that, but they also claim there was no 911 call made!
    You see, their morals, their code...it's a bad joke, dropped at the first sign of trouble. They're only as good as the world allows them to be. I'll show you. When the chips are down, these...These "civilized" people...they'll eat each other. See, I'm not a monster. I'm just ahead of the curve

  12. #12
    (((Fully Awake))) Serendipper's Avatar
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    I will never think of my Police records the same again. Thanks P-goat!
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  13. #13
    JF1
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    Just go in to the PD and politely let them know you are looking at civil action against the neighbors and would like a copy of the complaints you made. It will involve a fee but that should do it.
    If for some reason that doesn't work, the FOIPA request as Michigander stated should work but will take a while.
    J
    Good times.

  14. #14
    Look! My Spine! RubenX's Avatar
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    I did went to the local PD station but since the issue spawns over 15 years, the lady said they could not do it. They needed the dates in order to find the reports.

    Per my latest reaserch (confirmed by comments here) I need my NCIC sheet to get the dates in question and then, request the actual reports from the PD. I'm now researching how to get that NCIC thingie.

  15. #15
    Hey guyz? Guyz? Wait up!! Siu Blue Wind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michigander View Post
    Send them a written freedom of information request, preferably with a signature certified mailing service of some sort. It's their job to find the stuff and give it to you. Government agencies often shaft people illegally with these requests, but by law they are supposed to give you whatever public information you want.

    It may cost you something like 100-200 dollars to get all of the reports, but they should be available. Also, soon after you make a report, you can get the audio from the officers microphone, provided that they actually went and talked to the neighbor. PD's usually get rid of their audio after 2-6 weeks, depending on their policy.

    The way to do this is with a simple memo, asking for all available relevant notation or documentation recorded on any medium that pertains to complaints by you about the particular residents of the house with the loud music. Or similar words to that extent.

    If you keep doing this after the first one, as in FOIA the results of each and every complaint, it should only cost you 5-15 dollars for each request. If I wanted to piss the police off, and get them to take action, this is how I would pester them. Of course, it may only make them more mad and get them to do nothing for sure, but that's where you're at now.
    Very proud of you. Glad you were able to share this info with someone else.
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  16. #16
    Super Moderator no1mad's Avatar
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    NCIC is like the credit reporting bureau for crime. You would be in that database if you committed a crime. If you haven't committed a crime, then your name (hopefully) should not be on that list. But if really want to see if you are in the NCIC database, you could walk into your local PD/Sheriff's and ask for a background check.
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  17. #17
    JF1
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    Quote Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
    NCIC is like the credit reporting bureau for crime. You would be in that database if you committed a crime. If you haven't committed a crime, then your name (hopefully) should not be on that list. But if really want to see if you are in the NCIC database, you could walk into your local PD/Sheriff's and ask for a background check.
    Exactly. NCIC isn't going to help you out unless you were the one who was arrested. Because of strict privacy laws, you will not be able to get an NCIC record on someone else so the NCIC route isn't going to help you at all. NCIC doesn't maintain a record of who filed a complaint.

    Either you try and remember the dates or file a a FOIA request that will compel them to research it.
    J
    Good times.

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