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-   -   panhandle for non standing job? (http://www.bikeforums.net/foo/602965-panhandle-non-standing-job.html)

goldfishin 11-15-09 02:32 PM

panhandle for non standing job?
 
i don't know of any jobs that don't involve standing that i am qualified for.

do you (i've a BA degree 3.47 gpa, and have held crappy jobs like lawn mowing and walmart)?


i was thinking of going out, hanging a sign around my neck reading "NEED JOB! CAN'T STAND FOR LONG PERIODS DUE TO FOOT NEUROMAS! EDUCATED! BA DEGREE 3.47!"

maybe with some pics of my paintings on it...

think i'd get arrested?

Snicklefritz 11-15-09 04:29 PM

I don't think you'd get arrested. I seem to recall reading an article a couple years ago about a guy who wore a sign on his chest saying something like "MIT grad needs a job" or something similar...and he ended up getting a good job.

What is your BS degree in?

goldfishin 11-15-09 04:45 PM

it's called an art and performance degree. it's basically just a bull **** degree that the university made up for people like me who didn't quite cut it at science (i switched over from physics half way through).... and of course the university doesn't keep up connections or anything with any real employers of people like me, so even if you do waste time going to the career center all they do is waste your time on silly job hunt tips that don't do **** to help you find a job.... of course, if the government wasn't backing my loans they'd sing a different tune.

anyway, i paint, and i paint well for someone that's only spend around 1000 hours painting (that's all the time i could find to do it, and i'm probably more of a history major than an art major thanks to all the history classes i've taken... and forgotten... actually, my degree is like 1/3 sophomore and below science, 1/3 senior and below history, and 1/3 senior and below art.).

http://metreonfuture.deviantart.com/gallery/

CbadRider 11-15-09 04:48 PM

Does your issue with your feet qualify as a disability? Most employers will accomodate you by providing a chair so you don't have to be on your feet all day.

goldfishin 11-15-09 04:56 PM

i doubt it. in most of the jobs they say "can you do this job with or without reasonable accommodation"
and "standing for long periods" in the application.

and the doc said i could stand for long period... of course, the doc told me to take prednisone and gave me some inserts. i used the inserts but they did little. i didn't take the drug as when i typed the drug into google i noticed side effects like diabetes, osteoporosis, shut off adrenal gland... (i distrust drugs after what one doc prescribed to me did something rather awful to me)... if i had taken it i'm not so sure that it would have done anything helpful anyway. i did start using anti inflammatory cream, and it helps, but i didn't get the feeling back in my toes till a couple weeks or so after i quit.

i can do most things just fine. i can lift weights, i can do a small number of sprints or run a short distance as long as i can rest my feed afterward... but i can't stand or walk for long periods. if i do i just end up back to where i was (i've started lifting and sprinting barefoot in an attempt to strengthen my feet to correct the mechanical issues that may have caused this problem in the first place.)

no1mad 11-15-09 05:09 PM

Either go into business for yourself or go back to school for a CJ degree. Judges don't do too much standing.

Siu Blue Wind 11-15-09 05:48 PM

I suggest you bring a tall stool and a metal cup when you stand on the corner.

What happened to your job at WalMart? And you never thanked me for that check I sent you a few years ago. :notamused:

goldfishin 11-15-09 06:18 PM

you never sent me a check. and i already said what happened with the walmart job. not feeling my toes for four months put me in a rather bad mood which led to them pressuring me to quit... although the fact that i was about to start getting insurance just when they did that tells me that there may have been a bit more to it than that.

MillCreek 11-15-09 06:48 PM

I strongly advise you to go see an orthopedic surgeon specializing in feet or a podiatrist. There are other means of treating Morton's neuromas, such as depot injections of long-lasting steroids directly into the lesion, or surgery to remove the lesion. I had a neuroma in my right foot, and it was cured with a single steroid injection. I have had no problems for 15 years since.

Michigander 11-15-09 07:28 PM

If you really need to take pressure off of your feet, and for whatever reason Millcreek's suggestion doesn't work, I think I know of a product that might help.

Honda makes a system for people with leg problems. It's where you sit on a bicycle seat type thing, and you have these leg braces with knee joint flex points which you strap yourself into. Takes the pressure off your knees and feet, and puts it straight on your ass.

I don't know off hand what they're called, but I saw Honda people from Japan display them at the SAE congress. I'd have got more info, but they spoke about as much English as I do Japanese.

goldfishin 11-15-09 08:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MillCreek (Post 10035105)
I strongly advise you to go see an orthopedic surgeon specializing in feet or a podiatrist. There are other means of treating Morton's neuromas, such as depot injections of long-lasting steroids directly into the lesion, or surgery to remove the lesion. I had a neuroma in my right foot, and it was cured with a single steroid injection. I have had no problems for 15 years since.

if i had money for it.... maybe. i had considered the injection but the problem is that it can cause more problems than i want to bother with, such as reducing the fat pad on the bottom of the foot.

i was reading a forum full of people who had the removal surgery and things did not look so hot for them. the nerves have a tendency to re-grow in the form of a stump and cause even more pain.

i'd really like to try active release therapy at some point. the thing i fear is that i ignored it for too long (trying to save money:rolleyes:) and now the nerves not swollen so much as semi permanently enlarged with calcification and scar tissue. i was reading on a lifting forum a while back that lifters were having luck having their injuries cured with this... but that was with things other than neuromas... mostly muscle and tendon damage from overuse injuries.

MillCreek 11-15-09 09:14 PM

Fat and muscle necrosis generally only occurs with repeated steroid injections. It will not get better by itself. What resources does your community have for those without healthcare insurance?

goldfishin 11-15-09 09:16 PM

uh... none. :wtf:

LesterOfPuppets 11-15-09 09:37 PM

I've had a couple of sitting jobs:

Telephone Survey Tech: Call people on the phone and ask them a battery of questions about health insurance, beer, frozen vegetables, etc. The test involved reading English out loud and typing relatively accurately at least 25 wpm.

Telephone Tech Support: This one required more geek knowledge and paid a couple bucks an hour more. It involved playing silly online games and cruising the web waiting for someone to call and say their DSL wasn't working.

My favorite dream job I'd do if I had a degree is teaching English in southeast Asia. A friend did it in Japan in the 90s and loved it! Most require a 4-year college degree, so I never went. I imagine this could be done with just a little standing.

Big_e 11-15-09 10:12 PM

If you have a BA degree, why not look into a job with your city? Get a job as a department manager? The only time you have to get up out of your desk is to walk to a meeting. At most, you'll have to drive a city vehicle to city hall for a conference and you can have an underling drive you there.

You can work there until you get back on your job track. I gotto warn you, lots of people came to the city "just for a little while" and have stayed. You can get too cozy and the pay is good for the work you do.

Many cities are switching from promoting from within (employees with no degrees but lots of job experience) to hiring applicants with no experience but have degrees and can speak clearly to the public and media.
It just sounds better when the media interviews the manager of Environmental Protection at the site of a chemical spill and the manager doesn't say alot of, "Um..yeah, uh. We'z working on the problem..."

The average city employee retires 10 years earlier than his/her private sector counterpart. You just have to put up with alot of incompetent co-workers and alot of BS from upper administration. Lord willing, I'll be retiring in 7 more years at the age of 52 and will be able to get my own business off the ground by then. Thats if I don't get rifted between that time.:(
Ernest

MillCreek 11-15-09 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfishin (Post 10035700)
uh... none. :wtf:

Are you in the USA? Are you near a medical school or a town/city that has a Federal Community Health Clinic?

goldfishin 11-15-09 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big_e (Post 10035934)
If you have a BA degree, why not look into a job with your city? Get a job as a department manager? The only time you have to get up out of your desk is to walk to a meeting. At most, you'll have to drive a city vehicle to city hall for a conference and you can have an underling drive you there.

You can work there until you get back on your job track. I gotto warn you, lots of people came to the city "just for a little while" and have stayed. You can get too cozy and the pay is good for the work you do.

Many cities are switching from promoting from within (employees with no degrees but lots of job experience) to hiring applicants with no experience but have degrees and can speak clearly to the public and media.
It just sounds better when the media interviews the manager of Environmental Protection at the site of a chemical spill and the manager doesn't say alot of, "Um..yeah, uh. We'z working on the problem..."

The average city employee retires 10 years earlier than his/her private sector counterpart. You just have to put up with alot of incompetent co-workers and alot of BS from upper administration. Lord willing, I'll be retiring in 7 more years at the age of 52 and will be able to get my own business off the ground by then. Thats if I don't get rifted between that time.:(
Ernest

how do you get a job like that? the only city jobs i've seen are things like lifeguard, 911 operator, and laborer (and they won't even have me for labor when i try for it! i'm too ignorant for it!).

Big_e 11-16-09 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfishin (Post 10036202)
how do you get a job like that? the only city jobs i've seen are things like lifeguard, 911 operator, and laborer (and they won't even have me for labor when i try for it! i'm too ignorant for it!).

Check nearby cities. I'm serious when I say that Dallas hired 5 new managers within the last 3 years. That's just in the Code Enforcement Department alone. These people had no inspector experience at all. The city is desperate to give itself a facelift and have professional people at the manager level.
Do check other cities websites too. Very few of my co-workers live in Dallas. Most drive 45 minutes to an hour just to get to work! I can and do bicycle to work.
Ernest

goldfishin 11-16-09 09:12 AM

poop

Position Emp. Type Salary Filing Date
Laborer Aviation Full-time $21,651.00 - $35,724.00 annually Continuous
Laborer Code Compliance Full-time $21,651.00 - $35,724.00 annually Continuous
Laborer Equipment & Building Services Full-time $21,651.00 - $35,724.00 annually Continuous
Laborer II Aviation Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Laborer II Code Compliance Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Laborer II Equipment & Building Services Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Laborer II Park and Recreation Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Laborer II Public Works & Transportation Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Laborer II Street Services Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Laborer II Water Utilities Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Laborer Park and Recreation Full-time $21,651.00 - $35,724.00 annually Continuous
Laborer Public Works & Transportation Full-time $21,651.00 - $35,724.00 annually Continuous
Laborer Street Services Full-time $21,651.00 - $35,724.00 annually Continuous
Laborer Water Utilities Full-time $21,651.00 - $35,724.00 annually Continuous
Mechanic II (Auto) Full-time $28,817.00 - $47,548.00 annually 11/20/09
Police Officer Trainee I Full-time $41,690.00 - $41,690.00 annually 11/30/09
Truck Driver II Sanitation Services Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Truck Driver II Street Services Full-time $23,816.00 - $39,296.00 annually Continuous
Page # of 1



nevermind..... i was looking at the wrong thing...

poop


Candidates must have a Bachelor’s degree in business or related field and ten (10) years of executive level management experience. Municipal experience in an organization of comparable size and complexity to the City of Dallas is desired. A Master’s degree in business or public administration is highly preferred.

and for some reason their god damned email doesn't work!

Rob P. 11-16-09 01:34 PM

Uhh, ok so you have a Bachelors degree in art. You can paint and likely draw. WHY are you working at lowlife Walmart jobs?

Look for work as a graphics designer. Or commercial artist. Both are sit down jobs that pay fairly well. Not great, but decent.

And, do your paintings in the evenings and weekends as side money. Best of both worlds.

goldfishin 11-16-09 02:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rob P. (Post 10038239)
Uhh, ok so you have a Bachelors degree in art. You can paint and likely draw. WHY are you working at lowlife Walmart jobs?

Look for work as a graphics designer. Or commercial artist. Both are sit down jobs that pay fairly well. Not great, but decent.

And, do your paintings in the evenings and weekends as side money. Best of both worlds.

how the hell do i get those jobs though?! every time I look for one it always requires me to know a ton of programs and have years of experience.

jccaclimber 11-16-09 02:27 PM

So you've got a degree in art, and are complaining that you can't get a job in business? Perhaps Rob P has the right idea. If not, maybe a degree in another field, or a call center would work. The downside of call centers is that the turnover rate is high because the job sucks. The up side is that the pay is decent for the hours, and if you can suffer through then you get health insurance after a certain point.

jccaclimber 11-16-09 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfishin (Post 10038383)
how the hell do i get those jobs though?! every time I look for one it always requires me to know a ton of programs and have years of experience.

Either find a way to learn the programs (find a student copy you can buy somewhere online, they all have them), or start doing some volunteer work in whatever field you want so that you have some experience to show.

coffeecake 11-16-09 03:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by goldfishin (Post 10038383)
how the hell do i get those jobs though?! every time I look for one it always requires me to know a ton of programs and have years of experience.

Quote:

Originally Posted by jccaclimber (Post 10038535)
Either find a way to learn the programs (find a student copy you can buy somewhere online, they all have them), or start doing some volunteer work in whatever field you want so that you have some experience to show.

You find a company desperate for any design work, and bull**** your way in. I have a 4-year BFA and taught myself Illustrator, FlexiSign and CorelDraw on the fly. You can sign out books from the library and buy programs for cheap with an education license. (I have Creative Suite, cost me about $340 Cdn as opposed to $1200 for business license.) Now I've been in the field for almost four years, and I can synthesize a lot of different areas, such as digital, screenprinting, and vinyl cut. Lots of straight-outta-college graphics arts diplomas only deal with offset printing which is why I won't lose my job to some guy from the local tech college.

Doesn't matter if they're asking for people with experience, apply regardless. Sure you'll encounter rejection, but you can't get the job if you don't apply. I had ZERO experience, except for a Photoshop class, and the drive to escape my ****ty catering job. Took me 10 months and I almost gave up several times, but keep cranking out the resumes.

goldfishin 11-16-09 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeecake (Post 10038806)
You find a company desperate for any design work, and bull**** your way in. I have a 4-year BFA and taught myself Illustrator, FlexiSign and CorelDraw on the fly. You can sign out books from the library and buy programs for cheap with an education license. (I have Creative Suite, cost me about $340 Cdn as opposed to $1200 for business license.) Now I've been in the field for almost four years, and I can synthesize a lot of different areas, such as digital, screenprinting, and vinyl cut. Lots of straight-outta-college graphics arts diplomas only deal with offset printing which is why I won't lose my job to some guy from the local tech college.

Doesn't matter if they're asking for people with experience, apply regardless. Sure you'll encounter rejection, but you can't get the job if you don't apply. I had ZERO experience, except for a Photoshop class, and the drive to escape my ****ty catering job. Took me 10 months and I almost gave up several times, but keep cranking out the resumes.


are there any special places to look for these types of jobs or should i just monster them all?


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