Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    Lost AngryScientist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    nutley, nj
    Posts
    4,450
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    recommend me a coffee maker!

    foo is littered with coffee threads, so i figured id start one more. my old pot has given up the ghost. i want something nice, something good.

    requirements:

    makes good coffee!
    ability to make one cup at a time
    not a french press (i already have one, love it, but its inconvenient on a daily basis for me)
    i already have an espresso/cap. machine, so not one of those.

    what are you all using??

  2. #2
    on by skijor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    My Bikes
    Waterford RS-33, Salsa Vaya, Vision R40, Bacchetta Giro 20 ATT
    Posts
    876
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I just bought a Capresso MT-600. It'll do half pots (3-5 cups) which are more like two good size coffee cups worth. Only had it about a month and am happy so far. Frankly, I find that cleaning the French press is just as putzy as cleaning this new drip machine.

    If you only want one cup, why not get one of those combination French press/stainless travel mugs? Who drinks just one cup anyhow?

    Oh, and Millcreek is pretty much the coffee authority on BF. He recommended the MT-600 to me. He has its predecessor, the MT-500.

  3. #3
    BF Risk Manager
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Snohomish County, Washington USA
    My Bikes
    Road, mountain and folding
    Posts
    896
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The Capresso MT-600 is pretty much my 'go-to' recommendation if you can afford the $ 150 or so that it usually costs. The Capresso MT-500 is also still available from some vendors. If you want to keep it under $ 100, then the Zojirushi EC-BD15 would be my choice. Both of these meet two key criteria for the coffee fans: they reach the recommended brew temperatures of 195 to 205 degrees, and they have a thermal carafe rather than a hot plate that cooks the brewed coffee.

    Both of these drip coffee makers are pretty legendary in the coffee world. Probably the only better drip maker would be a Technivorm Moccamaster Thermal, but they run around $ 300 and are too tall to fit under the typical kitchen cabinet.
    Last edited by MillCreek; 03-06-10 at 07:30 AM.
    Regards, MillCreek
    Snohomish County, Washington USA

  4. #4
    Sprockette wabbit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    5,500
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i had this proctor silex for years, then got a french press. I like that it takes up less counter space and makes great coffee!
    You can catch more flies with honey than with vinegar. That's great...if you want to attract vermin.

  5. #5
    Junior Member DancesWithGolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Milpitas, CA
    My Bikes
    2009 Trek 7.2
    Posts
    14
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A few years ago, I was unhappy with my coffee maker. No matter what coffee I used, it tasted muddy. I read this review, http://www.associatedcontent.com/art...rm.html?cat=22 ,then put a meat thermometer in the coffee maker to measure how hot the water was. It was 140 degrees rather than 195-200. I bought the Technivorm and am very satisfied. Its kinda expensive, but makes a great cup of coffee.

  6. #6
    Lost AngryScientist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    nutley, nj
    Posts
    4,450
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    thanks all, i just picked up the MT-500 on sale at a local establishment.

    i actually went to the store with my wife for unrelated items, and saw the MT-500 sitting there on sale, and excitedly told my wife that a bike forums coffee expert told me to buy this pot. she shook her head and laughed.

    thanks!

  7. #7
    #5639 robertkat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    1,207
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DancesWithGolf View Post
    I bought the Technivorm and am very satisfied. Its kinda expensive, but makes a great cup of coffee.
    Those things look pretty awesome. How well does it work as far as the amount of coffee you brew? Is a full pot just as good as a half pot? I'm looking for a nice coffee maker myself and would prefer a small one, as I only need to make 2 or 3 cups at a time (2 or 3 usually are enough to fill up my thermos or commuter cup).

  8. #8
    Banned. ModoVincere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,626
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I recommend Carol...she's pretty good at making coffee and quite easy on the eyes too.

  9. #9
    Lost AngryScientist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    nutley, nj
    Posts
    4,450
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AngryScientist View Post
    thanks all, i just picked up the MT-500 on sale at a local establishment.

    i actually went to the store with my wife for unrelated items, and saw the MT-500 sitting there on sale, and excitedly told my wife that a bike forums coffee expert told me to buy this pot. she shook her head and laughed.

    thanks!
    mmm, and now the payoff, morning coffee!!

  10. #10
    BF Risk Manager
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Snohomish County, Washington USA
    My Bikes
    Road, mountain and folding
    Posts
    896
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Of course, to reach true coffee nirvana, you need fresh-roasted coffee that is ground just seconds before brewing. Some of us roast our own beans and have burr grinders that allow us to reach this nirvana. It all starts with but a single step.......
    Regards, MillCreek
    Snohomish County, Washington USA

  11. #11
    Lost AngryScientist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    nutley, nj
    Posts
    4,450
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MillCreek View Post
    Of course, to reach true coffee nirvana, you need fresh-roasted coffee that is ground just seconds before brewing. Some of us roast our own beans and have burr grinders that allow us to reach this nirvana. It all starts with but a single step.......
    well, there is a local establishment that sources and roasts their own beans right down the street from me, they're a very small family run place and their stuff is great. i do have a burr grinder, and of course, i did grind fresh beans this morning to break in the machine.

    roasting my own however, would be the next logical step.

    thanks again all.

  12. #12
    BF Risk Manager
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Snohomish County, Washington USA
    My Bikes
    Road, mountain and folding
    Posts
    896
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by AngryScientist View Post
    well, there is a local establishment that sources and roasts their own beans right down the street from me, they're a very small family run place and their stuff is great. i do have a burr grinder, and of course, i did grind fresh beans this morning to break in the machine.

    roasting my own however, would be the next logical step.

    thanks again all.
    In all truth, you are already about 90% there, especially if you can get the fresh-roasted beans locally. At any one time, we have one pound batches of three different coffees kept in the freezer in one-pound airtight jars. I take them out and grind them just before brewing. Coffee kept this way is good for about two weeks. I roast about three pounds every two weeks. We go through a lot of coffee, and the economics of roasting my own, in addition to the quality, pencils out for us. I have about 200 pounds of green coffee beans out in the garage.
    Regards, MillCreek
    Snohomish County, Washington USA

  13. #13
    BF Risk Manager
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Snohomish County, Washington USA
    My Bikes
    Road, mountain and folding
    Posts
    896
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So AS, how is the Capresso working out for you?
    Regards, MillCreek
    Snohomish County, Washington USA

  14. #14
    Lost AngryScientist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    nutley, nj
    Posts
    4,450
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MillCreek View Post
    So AS, how is the Capresso working out for you?
    fantastic. as a matter of fact over the weekend i picked up a costa rican blend from the local coffee joint. the aroma of that stuff after i pop it through the burr grinder is simply fantastic, it actually is enough to elevate my mood, its that good.

    i was worried about how long the thermal carafe would keep the contents warm, but generally that has not proven to be an issue. all in all, this was a big upgrade for me.

    i will also mention that i do also own a capresso expresso machine as well as a french press, and none of the three machines i have now is disposable. each serves a purpose and they each work well. i may have reached my coffee nirvana.

    what type of roast are you on this week millcreek?

  15. #15
    shaken, not stirred. gnome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    The Shaky Isles.
    My Bikes
    I've lost count.
    Posts
    2,861
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ModoVincere View Post
    I recommend Carol...she's pretty good at making coffee and quite easy on the eyes too.
    sounds good. my local baristas a like that. make a good coffee and very easy on the eyes as well.

    For home use I use a Moka Express.
    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live. ~Mark Twain, "Taming the Bicycle"
    vBulletin: snafu

  16. #16
    derailleurs are overrated bigbenaugust's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    KIGX
    My Bikes
    2009 Motobecane Fantom CX, 2011 Windsor Shetland mini-velo, 2012 Motobecane Fantom Cross Uno SSCX
    Posts
    1,688
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    4-cup Sunbeam. $4 from Stanford Surplus Sales. But then, I'm not picky and I'm the only coffee drinker in the house.
    --Ben
    Carrboro Bike Coalition - putting the "bike" in "CARrboro" :)
    2011 Motobecane Fantom Cross Uno, 2009 Motobecane Fantom CX, 2011 Windsor Shetland
    Previously: 2000 Trek 4500 (2000-2003), 2003 Novara Randonee (2003-2006), 2003 Giant Rainier (2003-2008), 2005 Xootr Swift (2005-2007), 2007 Nashbar 1x9 (2007-2011)
    Current Linux Usage (by machine): Arch: I Debian: II openSUSE: I

  17. #17
    BF Risk Manager
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Snohomish County, Washington USA
    My Bikes
    Road, mountain and folding
    Posts
    896
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Right now in the freezer, I have a Honduran Corah, a Zambian Munali and a Red Sea Blend. I had the Honduran this morning in a french press.
    Regards, MillCreek
    Snohomish County, Washington USA

  18. #18
    Banned. ModoVincere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,626
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MillCreek View Post
    Right now in the freezer, I have a Honduran Corah, a Zambian Munali and a Red Sea Blend. I had the Honduran this morning in a french press.
    In the freezer? I thought you weren't supposed to freeze it.

  19. #19
    BF Risk Manager
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Snohomish County, Washington USA
    My Bikes
    Road, mountain and folding
    Posts
    896
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ModoVincere View Post
    In the freezer? I thought you weren't supposed to freeze it.
    This is a hotly-contested issue in the coffee community, dwarfing such minor tussles as abortion, *** control and the Middle East. There actually has been some research done on this. Based on my own controlled trials, my review of the literature and my training as a chemist, I put my whole beans into an airtight jar immediately after roasting and then put the jar in the freezer. I keep the beans in the airtight frozen dark, removing them only to portion out what is immediately ground and brewed. The beans are still pretty much frozen when the hot water hits them. To my palate, this preserves the quality of the beans for at least two weeks. I roast sufficient quantities such that I roast 2-3 pounds every two weeks, so my coffee is pretty much never more than two weeks out of the roaster.

    In my opinion, and I emphasize that this is only my opinion, the worst way to store coffee is pre-ground in the refrigerator in a non-airtight container. The coffee quickly picks up odors and moisture from the fridge and goes stale quickly. If I did not roast my own, I would still put the whole beans in an airtight jar in the freezer. I think the combination of whole bean, airtight storage and freezing temperatures slows the staling process. The further you get away from this (pre-grinding, loose in a bag on the counter or in the fridge), the quicker you will get staling. I really can taste the difference between coffee stored in my preferred fashion versus other methods. I know, because I have run my own controlled trials using my own coffee. But, your mileage may vary.

    PS: Over on Home Barista, there was an interesting experiment on freezing coffee for espresso. The consensus there was that freezing whole beans in an airtight jar preserved the quality for at least two months. And the experiment was done by some very experienced coffee people, so I give their opinion a great deal of weight. Given my turnover, there is no way coffee would last that long at my house, but it could be of value for those people who use small quantities and need to keep a pound or two fresh as long as possible.
    Last edited by MillCreek; 03-09-10 at 07:00 PM.
    Regards, MillCreek
    Snohomish County, Washington USA

  20. #20
    Caustic Soccer Mom apclassic9's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Millstone WV
    Posts
    1,759
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have found that the Costa Rican beans, Kenyan AA, Guatamalan, and Sumatran beans are the most flavorful. I buy roasted beans in bulk & freeze them.... no friendly local roasters near my house!! My beans go from freezer to air-tight container (about a week's worth) to burr grinder to coffee maker.
    As with mud, life, too, slides by.

  21. #21
    Banned. ModoVincere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,626
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by MillCreek View Post
    This is a hotly-contested issue in the coffee community, dwarfing such minor tussles as abortion, *** control and the Middle East. There actually has been some research done on this. Based on my own controlled trials, my review of the literature and my training as a chemist, I put my whole beans into an airtight jar immediately after roasting and then put the jar in the freezer. I keep the beans in the airtight frozen dark, removing them only to portion out what is immediately ground and brewed. The beans are still pretty much frozen when the hot water hits them. To my palate, this preserves the quality of the beans for at least two weeks. I roast sufficient quantities such that I roast 2-3 pounds every two weeks, so my coffee is pretty much never more than two weeks out of the roaster.

    In my opinion, and I emphasize that this is only my opinion, the worst way to store coffee is pre-ground in the refrigerator in a non-airtight container. The coffee quickly picks up odors and moisture from the fridge and goes stale quickly. If I did not roast my own, I would still put the whole beans in an airtight jar in the freezer. I think the combination of whole bean, airtight storage and freezing temperatures slows the staling process. The further you get away from this (pre-grinding, loose in a bag on the counter or in the fridge), the quicker you will get staling. I really can taste the difference between coffee stored in my preferred fashion versus other methods. I know, because I have run my own controlled trials using my own coffee. But, your mileage may vary.

    PS: Over on Home Barista, there was an interesting experiment on freezing coffee for espresso. The consensus there was that freezing whole beans in an airtight jar preserved the quality for at least two months. And the experiment was done by some very experienced coffee people, so I give their opinion a great deal of weight. Given my turnover, there is no way coffee would last that long at my house, but it could be of value for those people who use small quantities and need to keep a pound or two fresh as long as possible.
    good to know....my routine is I roast about 1 1/2 cups of beans every five to seven days. I then place them in an not so airtight container for 24-36 hours for degassing. Then I grind them, and place them in an airtight container which goes in my freezer, even though I was under the impression not to do this. Every other day, I portion out some to bring to the office. Coffee done this way completely blows away the pre-ground crap from the store.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •