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  1. #1
    www.theheadbadge.com cudak888's Avatar
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    I can't stand bad mechanics.

    Let's see, if I remember Internal Combustion Engines 101 correctly, oil is the lifeblood of an engine, no? So it is.

    ...then why tempt fate?





    Ah yes, I forgot. It isn't the mechanic's engine. "Can't find a replacement gasket? Heck, screw it - just bring the RTV. Lots of it."

    -Kurt

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    Not about bad mechanics but bad maintenance instead. This 1988 Toyota had about 250,000 miles on it and I doubt if the oil had been changed for the last 100,000 or so.






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    www.theheadbadge.com cudak888's Avatar
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    That's pretty bad, but still not as bad as what you'll find in some boats. Salt water and steel don't take kindly to each other.

    -Kurt

  4. #4
    Chepooka StupidlyBrave's Avatar
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    I'm only running full synthetic now. It's a bit more expensive, even if you figure more miles per change.

    On my last set of cars, I changed the oil once each season. So my Pathfinder (VG30E) was changed every 2000 miles or less. It had over 230K miles before the rust was too much trouble to fix. I'd still be using it now, if it wasn't such a good cash-4-clunkers trade.

    My newer cars are changed per the owner's manual religiously. However, they are getting top quality oil. The Passat VR6 I just bought is being changed over to full synthetic after 130k of "dino" oil. I plan to switch it to Amsoil, as a friend of mine is a dealer. The other cars are getting Mobil 1 Extended Performance or Shell Rotella T6.

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    Quote Originally Posted by desconhecido View Post
    Not about bad mechanics but bad maintenance instead. This 1988 Toyota had about 250,000 miles on it and I doubt if the oil had been changed for the last 100,000 or so.
    Impossible, no Toyota I've ever seen could go 1/4 that long without leaking more oil than you drained out. As a side note, that's disgusting. One of my friends just simply stopped changing the oil in his car in anticipation of scrapping it when he got a new one and it wasn't that bad. I never did get a count, but I figure somewhere in the range of 15-20k miles. It had less than a quart of gritty sludge when I drained it to change it (should have 4). Interestingly, the car still provides the same fuel mileage as ever, but I suspect the engine life took a dive with that one.

  6. #6
    Senior Member skiahh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StupidlyBrave View Post
    I'm only running full synthetic now. It's a bit more expensive, even if you figure more miles per change.

    On my last set of cars, I changed the oil once each season. So my Pathfinder (VG30E) was changed every 2000 miles or less. It had over 230K miles before the rust was too much trouble to fix. I'd still be using it now, if it wasn't such a good cash-4-clunkers trade.

    My newer cars are changed per the owner's manual religiously. However, they are getting top quality oil. The Passat VR6 I just bought is being changed over to full synthetic after 130k of "dino" oil. I plan to switch it to Amsoil, as a friend of mine is a dealer. The other cars are getting Mobil 1 Extended Performance or Shell Rotella T6.
    It's possible it came new with synthetic. What's been run in it since, who knows?

    I'm not sold on Amsoil... I put some in my first diesel pickup and shortly thereafter (can't remember exact time or mileage now), it was in the shop for a short block replacement. One of the cylinders was burned. I realize it could be a number of things and the tech though it might be the injector, but the truck had 90K on it with no problems whatsoever... but new oil and pretty quickly, mileage and power went to crap. Fortunately, the Cummins engine has a 100K warranty, so it was covered, but still... makes me wonder.

    My current diesel pickup is running Mobil 1.
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    The Toyota in question is a 1988 4 Runner with 22RE engine. The 22RE is a pretty good engine and they don't leak much oil. But, if it's got bad rings and a lot of blow-by, I suppose that could explain the condition of the valve train. I picked this thing up in non-running condition a while back for not much money with the intention of using it for parts. Previous owner had it die on him and couldn't figure out why it wouldn't start. Cam is about 45 degrees out of time -- that's the short answer.

  8. #8
    Senior Member toytech's Avatar
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    A lot of domestics had RTV glued on valve covers from the factory in the late 70's and 80's, they did that because production tolerances were so poor that gaskets would not seal. RTV also out lasts cork gaskets done properly (too much is very bad though- plugs pickups screens). Almost all modern engines are sealed with RTV on oil pans, timing covers, many water pumps too.
    Besides, it's a ford it would have leaked anyway. I think it is a design feature
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  9. #9
    Senior Member toytech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by desconhecido View Post
    Not about bad mechanics but bad maintenance instead. This 1988 Toyota had about 250,000 miles on it and I doubt if the oil had been changed for the last 100,000 or so.






    You can see the shiny surface of that 22re chain where it has been rubbing a hole in your timing cover. New chain, gears, guides and likely a new timing cover are in order. You will need a new headgasket too. (has to come off to replace chain)
    "Never kick a fresh turd on a hot day."--Harry S. Truman

  10. #10
    ÖöÖöÖöÖöÖö Dannihilator's Avatar
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    Isn't that what all fords do?
    Quote Originally Posted by scrodzilla
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    Quote Originally Posted by toytech View Post
    You can see the shiny surface of that 22re chain where it has been rubbing a hole in your timing cover. New chain, gears, guides and likely a new timing cover are in order. You will need a new headgasket too. (has to come off to replace chain)
    Yeah, it's the disintegration of the driver's side timing chain guide which led to the death of this sucker.

    In general, you don't need to pull the head to replace the timing cover on a 22RE. But this one needs a touch more than new timing chain, sprockets, guides, and timing cover, so the head will come off.

  12. #12
    Senior Member JonnyHK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dannihilator View Post
    Isn't that what all fords do?
    Can't comment about Fords, but I remember reading something funny about radial aero engines (WW2 and later).

    "Radials don't leak oil. They mark their territory."

  13. #13
    derailleurs are overrated bigbenaugust's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
    Impossible, no Toyota I've ever seen could go 1/4 that long without leaking more oil than you drained out. As a side note, that's disgusting. One of my friends just simply stopped changing the oil in his car in anticipation of scrapping it when he got a new one and it wasn't that bad. I never did get a count, but I figure somewhere in the range of 15-20k miles. It had less than a quart of gritty sludge when I drained it to change it (should have 4). Interestingly, the car still provides the same fuel mileage as ever, but I suspect the engine life took a dive with that one.
    The only reason my '00 Tacoma ever leaked was some doofus didn't tighten the plug all the way and I lost a quart overnight. They never saw my truck again. But then, I changed it every 5k or so. But by the time I was ready to sell it because I wasn't driving it, that came out to annually.
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  14. #14
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jccaclimber View Post
    Impossible, no Toyota I've ever seen could go 1/4 that long without leaking more oil than you drained out. As a side note, that's disgusting. One of my friends just simply stopped changing the oil in his car in anticipation of scrapping it when he got a new one and it wasn't that bad. I never did get a count, but I figure somewhere in the range of 15-20k miles. It had less than a quart of gritty sludge when I drained it to change it (should have 4). Interestingly, the car still provides the same fuel mileage as ever, but I suspect the engine life took a dive with that one.
    Huh what??!!@ I had a MKII Supra that went 250K miles with only oil-changes. Never had to replace anything out-of-schedule in the engine-compartment except for alternator VRM. Did timing-belts every 100k-miles and changed Mobil-1 every 10k-miles. Never ever leaked and never had to add oil between oil-changes.

  15. #15
    perpetually frazzled mickey85's Avatar
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    If that Toyota is runnable, once you get the timing cover fixed, there's an old mechanic's trick involving kerosene that seems to work every time...

    substitute one quart of kerosene in the crankcase for one quart of oil - i.e. 5 quarts of oil = 1 quart of kero, 4 quarts oil.

    Turn the defroster on high and let the engine idle until you can just barely feel warm air out of the defroster. Stop the engine, drain the oil and swap the oil filter.

    Put good detergent oil in there (Rotella, etc) and a GOOD filter. Run it for 100 miles or so, then change the oil again.

    Each time, the filter will weigh about 10 lbs and be completely full of crud.

    Also, I ALWAYS run Rotella in my engines. My Olds had Quaker State in it, and it sludged up everything. Rotella to the rescue!
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  16. #16
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    I look for a good independent mechanic fi I ever need work to be done. Worth shopping around.

    My old Honda has it's oil changed every 7500 miles with Mobil 1 synthetic, which seems to be doing it's job. 287,000 and going strong. Both prior owners were mechanical engineers and very good about maintaining all elements of that car though. I'm probably the weak link of ownership
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  17. #17
    Chepooka StupidlyBrave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mickey85 View Post
    ...
    substitute one quart of kerosene in the crankcase for one quart of oil -...
    The folks at the oil enthusiast forums (yes, there is one), seem to be big on AutoRx.

    I have also heard of other folks using seafoam. Run a third of the can through the gas tank, allow the engine to suck in a third with a vacuum hose and use the last part of the can in the crankcase (abbreviated oil change, iirc). DIY here.

  18. #18
    perpetually frazzled mickey85's Avatar
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    I'll stick with kero - it's cheaper.


    As far as RTV silicone - I use it on my race motor instead of a gasket. It sticks to the cover, keeps leaks under control,and is easy to remove. Use the orange stuff.
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