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Old 09-21-10, 06:10 PM   #1
phantomcow2
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GMAT exam.

Has anybody here taken the GMAT exam? I am pretty certain I'll be attending business school, but my understanding is that most schools want to see a few years of work experience -- some more than others. That's fine; I already have a job offer waiting for me when I graduate (May 2011) with a BA in Economics. My concern is relating to the test itself. I have friends taking the MCAT's and GRE's, and they're taking them within a year of graduation, and sometimes even now, while still in college. I'm afraid that I'll lose some of the quantitative abilities I have if I wait a few years to take the GMAT exam. Should I take the GMAT exam sooner rather than later, and just sit on the scores, applying for business school in a couple years?
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Old 09-21-10, 06:40 PM   #2
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It's already been 8 years of college!
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Old 09-23-10, 03:11 PM   #3
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I took the GMAT a few years back....ok, about 15 years back. My BA was in econ also. If the GMAT is similar to what it was when I took it then you're correct, it was quantitative intensive. The geometry and math was tough. GMAT scores are good for a few years, aren't they ? You can take it now while your analytical and test taking skills are at their peak if you think you'll be enrolling within 5 years. I took the GMAT within 3 years, I think, after I graduated and did pretty well. The test preparation books you can buy are crucial. Frankly, I wouldn't wait past 5 years after after graduation. Your brain becomes better at real-world problem solving skills at the expense of scholastic know-how, imo.

Good luck, the world needs all the econ majors it can get

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Old 09-24-10, 04:19 PM   #4
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I took the GMAT 6 years after my undergrad.
I thought it was possibly the easiest test I've ever taken, and my BS is in Architecture.
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Old 09-24-10, 05:00 PM   #5
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Have to agree with zenzoomi. Take it now or within a year or two after graduation. Along with your analytical skills being at their peak, your test taking skills will be at their peak. You may not realize it now but there is a certain skill to taking tests. Also, if you don't go to grad school within 5 years of undergrad chances of you going at all start to decrease.
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Old 09-24-10, 05:59 PM   #6
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I took the GMAT 6 years after my undergrad.
I thought it was possibly the easiest test I've ever taken, and my BS is in Architecture.
About the same, except my undergrad was Geophysics. It was baffling, I saw all these people taking the test and running out of time when I had finished, checked and checked again.

I'd advise the OP to take it now however, test taking skills do fade in time.
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Old 09-24-10, 06:07 PM   #7
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Thank you all for the advice. I'm a math minor as well as an econ major, so I'm hoping that'll have prepared me well for the quantitative portion. I may take grad courses part time until I'm ready for business school, in an attempt to preserve my academic momentum. I think I'll take the GMAT shortly after graduation.
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Old 09-24-10, 06:40 PM   #8
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You shouldn't go to B school anyway. Its for sissies. Man up and stay in the real world. Start a business and create some jobs.


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Thank you all for the advice. I'm a math minor as well as an econ major, so I'm hoping that'll have prepared me well for the quantitative portion. I may take grad courses part time until I'm ready for business school, in an attempt to preserve my academic momentum. I think I'll take the GMAT shortly after graduation.
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Old 10-02-10, 05:53 AM   #9
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You shouldn't go to B school anyway. Its for sissies. Man up and stay in the real world. Start a business and create some jobs.
Go to business school...with your employer paying for it. That is what I did with Charles Schwab as they had the continuing education (carreer development) as part of of performance eval, and I was a senior rep who taught the internal stuff. Got the MBA, then they promptly laid me off - go figure. Lousy return on their investment, but set me up nicely.

Took the GMAT after a 30 year absence from formal education. Just licensing exams during the interum. Verbal components 99th percentile (first Masters and carreer as Social Worker, second carreer finance/stockbroker) which kept and developed those skill. Math, 52nd percentile - but in 30 years pythagorean theorem or calculating the cubic area of a cone were NEVER skills that I used - nor part of the math components of the MBA. Worse, they didn't have math that I did everyday, accrued interest in bonds or calculating margin requirements for a naked option position. After 30 years without formal math education and scoring that high, I felt sorry for those in the lower percentile!

My combined score was very good - but GPA is another issue to being selected. While 3.9 on my first Masters, they wouldn't consider it, and lets just say I had a good time as an undergraduate. 2.8 wasn't bad, but below the 3.0 min requirement and a couple turned me down on that basis. My son, current getting his MBA is a good test taker and the GMAT wasn't an issue, but was the classic slacker with a GPA to show for it. It took a letter from his employer strongly encouraging his admission, and now, he leads the class. The school is even recommending that he consider teaching.

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