Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 60
  1. #1
    Chief Slacking Officer ms.gio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    The City by the Lake
    My Bikes
    Fuji Track SE, Cannondale R300
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Photographers of Foo! Need your help on finding a lens.

    Hi guys!

    So, I'm looking to get a lens for my Nikon D3100 for portraits and night shots. I was told by a friend this evening while at the pool hall that he knew someone who was looking for a photographer to come to his night club on Friday and Saturday nights to take photos of the club goers. I would also get paid for it! Well, it sounds like a lot of fun. I would be able to dress up, socialize, have a good time, and take some pictures. Problem is this: I feel as though my stock lens that came with the Nikon D3100 is sufficient for the task at hand.

    After doing some research I noted the following lenses:
    Nikkor 35 f1.8 DX
    Nikkor 50 f1.4G

    Any recommendations? Either way I would like to get a lens that would allow me to take photos at a rather close range (ie. flowers). I understand for that I'm going to need a macro lens.

    Thanks
    Last edited by ms.gio; 03-26-11 at 09:18 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by x136 View Post
    Giolander: There can be only one.
    Giodome: Several impostors enter, only the real one leaves?

  2. #2
    Administrator Allen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atomic batteries to power; turbines to speed
    My Bikes
    Salsa La Raza, Panasonic Electric, Bria, Bamboo touring, Bamboo cargo
    Posts
    4,708
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The 50 has a minimum focus distance of 1.5 feet and the 35 has a minimum focus of 1 foot. The 35 would probably be the most versatile close up lens.

    The 50 1.4 is going to be a very sharp and fast lens. 50s tend to be the best lens for the money in most manufactures' lens sets and is going to be the better glass of the two.

    Personally, if I were you I'd get the 50 and step back a little if you need more in frame. A fifty is a 0 or standard lens; the 35 would be a -1 lens and a 75 is a +1. It's basically the same point of view of what we see and it is the cornerstone lens in any photographer's bag.
    Last edited by Allen; 03-25-11 at 01:20 AM.

  3. #3
    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Queanbeyan, Australia.
    Posts
    3,523
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    ms.gio, seeing as I'm a bloke who's been know to buy a few photographic tools (toys) in the past I don't want to stop you from spending money if you want but I have done some night club photography in the past and for such a task your standard zoom lens is just fine. I remember doing such work with just the standard lens because in a nightclub situation you will have a lot of trouble standing back as far as a portrait photographer would like to.

    I started off using a semi professional 35mm slr with a BIG Metz flash *** but finished off using a waterproof compact camera. Getting drinks spilled on your gear can be an issue so you don't really want to spend too much is such a situation.

    EDIT: A modern 35mm lens is the equivalent of the old 50mm standard. A 50mm now makes for a nice short portrait lens but I doubt you could use it in a club. What will happen is that 3 or 4 people will want in on a shot and you will be struggling to get back far enough to get them in.

    Anthony

  4. #4
    Ogr8nwmypstmksnosnse pgoat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    My Bikes
    1986 Trek 500, 2003 Orbea Team Euskaltel, 2005 Cannondale R1000
    Posts
    2,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ms.gio View Post
    Either way I would like to get a lens that would allow me to take photos at a rather close range (ie. flowers).
    For this - and I am hardly the expert here, fwiw - I believe you would need a macro lens. You may be able to get a 50ish mm lens, which as Allen said is the standard all-around POV and would work great for your nightclub work, that is also a "Micro" which would kill two birds with one stone.

    I have 2 old film Nikons and have a basic 50mm on one for general photography, and a 55mm Macro on the other, which lets me shoot the same things but also do the close ups you mentioned. I am just not sure what is available for your camera (my lenses are older, manual focus models).
    Quote Originally Posted by jsharr View Post
    People whose sig line does not include a jsharr quote annoy me.

  5. #5
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,990
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ms.gio View Post
    Hi guys!

    So, I'm looking to get a lens for my Nikon D3100 for portraits and night shots. I was told by a friend this evening while at the pool hall that he knew someone who was looking for a photographer to come to his night club on Friday and Saturday nights to take photos of the club goers. I would also get paid for it! Well, it sounds like a lot of fun. I would be able to dress up, socialize, have a good time, and take some pictures. Problem is this: I feel as though my stock lens that came with the Nikon D3100 is sufficient for the task at hand.

    After doing some research I noted the following lenses:
    Nikkor 35 f1.8 DX
    Nikkor 50 f1.4G

    Any recommendations? Either way I would like to get a lens that would allow me to take photos at a rather close range (ie. flowers).

    Thanks
    I'm not hugely familiar with Nikon gear so if Nikon don't have parallels with Canon lenses (which for the most part I gather they do) feel free to ignore this.

    For close-up work like flowers you really want a macro lens. For portrait work you want a longer lens - anything too wide tends to produce unflattering images. For larger groups or if you can't get back very far you want a wide lens.

    I imagine your camera has a 1.5x crop factor which means the 35mm will have an effective focal length (EFL) of around 50mm and the 50mm will have an EFL of 75mm.

    Canon do an EF-S 60mm macro lens which works as a regular 60mm lens but can also focus close enough and with enough magnification to give you the decent pictures of flowers and bugs and stuff. I'd be surprised if Nikon didn't have something comparable.

    If you're taking something to a nightclub then unless you've got somewhere secure to store it when it's not in use and somewhere designated to stand while taking pictures I'd suggest the least expensive option. Someone already mentioned getting drinks spilled on it, and you also potentially need to consider it being bumped, knocked over, and (depending on the club) the possibility of someone taking exception to being photographed. So from that perspective I'd stick with something cheap.

    A lot of night shots are going to turn out to be quite grainy - a flash (especially if it's the flash built in to the camera) can ruin the atmosphere so you'll need to use a high ISO and an large aperture. Obviously in a nightclub people aren't going to be staying still long enough for long exposure times to work.

    If you've got somewhere out of the way you can set up a tripod and be confident it won't get bumped, and you've got an external flash ***, you can get some interesting results with a slow exposure (1-2 seconds or so) with a pop of flash at the end (also called second curtain sync), with the flash bounced off the ceiling. It takes a lot of trial and error and a good number of the results won't be anything special but you'll get a few that have a great feeling of atmosphere.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Mr. Embrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Saint Joseph, MO
    My Bikes
    1988 Cannondale ST400
    Posts
    343
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not to rain on your parade, but this exact question/scenario is covered a million times in flickr group discussions. As a couple rules of thumb; if you're asking here, you're probably not ready for the job, and if you need to buy a new lens for the job, you're probably not ready for the job. Can you guarantee great results without having to ask us how?

    Try a search on the flickr groups. Great info can be found there.

    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club

  7. #7
    Senior Member rumrunn6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    25 miles northwest of Boston
    My Bikes
    Bottecchia Sprint
    Posts
    12,136
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    28-70 2.8 is my favorite party lens
    cycling is like baseball ~ it doesn't take much to make it interesting

  8. #8
    long time visiter Alfster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    SW Ontario
    My Bikes
    2005 Trek 6700 disc 2007 Orbea Onix 2009 Raleigh One Way
    Posts
    586
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Embrey View Post
    Not to rain on your parade, but this exact question/scenario is covered a million times in flickr group discussions. As a couple rules of thumb; if you're asking here, you're probably not ready for the job, and if you need to buy a new lens for the job, you're probably not ready for the job. Can you guarantee great results without having to ask us how?

    Try a search on the flickr groups. Great info can be found there.

    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/nikondi...rch=night+club
    Almost nobody is ready for new opportunities. It's those that are scared to take risks that never succeed. What's the worst that can happen ... Ms. Gio doesn't get paid for the photos, but has a great time meeting people and having fun???

    Good links btw. I've been trying to figure out how to take better low-light photos for stage performances.

  9. #9
    Chepooka StupidlyBrave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Central PA
    My Bikes
    1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed
    Posts
    1,157
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Alfster View Post
    . I've been trying to figure out how to take better low-light photos for stage performances.
    Good high-ISO performance
    Fast lens
    Spot Metering

    I took this with a 55-300mm f4-5.6 (not fast) at ISO6400

  10. #10
    Chepooka StupidlyBrave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Central PA
    My Bikes
    1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed
    Posts
    1,157
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ms.gio View Post
    Any recommendations?
    I would tend to try to avoid a flash. That makes the problem more difficult.

    If you think firing a flash is OK (and it may very well be), I'd consider sticking with the kit lens for it's focal length versatility. If not, then you might have to spend for a fast prime (like Allen suggests) to achieve good low light performance. Then you have to be careful with depth-of-field...If you need to save a few bucks, you might consider picking up an older MF prime. Loss of AF presents it's own challenges here, but these lenses can be bargains. I just sold a 55mm f1.8 for $50. That's on the high side because it was in very good shape and came with all the accessories, including case.

    For work with flowers, light is less of a problem. But minimum focus distance/depth of field/bokeh are things you want to watch for. I like the idea of a macro lens for this purpose.

  11. #11
    Chief Slacking Officer ms.gio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    The City by the Lake
    My Bikes
    Fuji Track SE, Cannondale R300
    Posts
    189
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Embrey View Post
    Not to rain on your parade, but this exact question/scenario is covered a million times in flickr group discussions. As a couple rules of thumb; if you're asking here, you're probably not ready for the job, and if you need to buy a new lens for the job, you're probably not ready for the job. Can you guarantee great results without having to ask us how?
    The following reasons why I came here:

    1) I've known the core posters here for a while.
    2) We also have a good number of photographers in the group.
    3) This was the first place that I came to after finding out.
    4) Why not go to a group with which you're comfortable in opening up a discussion that you feel that they'll have helpful advice or guidance?

    In all honesty, I was slightly intimidated in going to the flickr group and be called a noob. It's been some time since being behind the camera and I'm kinda new to the dslr world. I'm just trying to take in as much information as a I can and become a better photographer. In the end, forgive me for coming here to ask.

    btw, thank you for the links. I'll just look there.
    Last edited by ms.gio; 03-25-11 at 10:25 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by x136 View Post
    Giolander: There can be only one.
    Giodome: Several impostors enter, only the real one leaves?

  12. #12
    Senior Member bikebuddha's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Somewhere in time
    Posts
    1,109
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I found the Nikon 85 1.8 to be a pretty good portrait lens. It's not as good as the Pentax A*85 1.4 I used to have but it still pretty good. Bokeh can be a little rough depending on the background.
    The few, the proud, the likely insane, Metro-Atlanta bicycle commuters.

  13. #13
    Senior Member avmanansala's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    My Bikes
    Cannondale Road Warrior
    Posts
    401
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ms. Gio, what's your budget?

    Personally, I would look at a fast lens, f/2.8 or wider to allow for better AF lock and a brighter viewfinder in lower light.

    On a DX Nikon body, this will be equiv. to a 50mm "normal" lens on a 35mm film camera. This should be enough for shots with 2-3 people. On the down side, it is a prime (fixed focal length) lens. Zoom with your feet.

    What about your kit lens do you find lacking? (What is you kit lens BTW?)
    Do you have a flash besides the built in? (Do you even want to use flash or Can you use flash?)

    I moderate at Nikonians.org (user id "avm247"). There is a 25 day free trial membership and membership is $25 for a Silver level which allows access to all forums. There is a forum for the 3100 and another for event photography.

    If you want, you can PM or email me, I'd be happy to share whatever info I can.
    "Study your math, kids. Key to the Universe." - Gabriel in The Prophecy

  14. #14
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,990
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Another consideration if you're trying to get into wide-angle photography with flash is to make sure you get full flash coverage across the field of view. Bouncing the flash off the ceiling should overcome it but make sure your flashgun is powerful enough to reflect and still illuminate the scene. If the ceiling is dark it can cause problems, if the ceiling is a nasty colour it can cause all sorts of issues with the colour balance in your picture.

    If bouncing the flash isn't an option then diffusing it may work, but again you'll lose some of the power of the light to the diffuser.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Crazydad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Leander, TX
    My Bikes
    Yeti ARC-C, Jamis Xenith, Canondale R500
    Posts
    328
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have used the 35mm when I had a D60 and have to say it was a pretty good lens for indoor shooting, but not for portrait. That short of a lens requires you to get fairly close for a portrait and that lens has a pretty significant amount of barrel distortion on close subjects.

    On a DX format camera, 50mm is a decent portrait lens since the crop factor of the DX sensor makes it equivilant to about a 75mm lens on a full frame sensor. Down side is for group shots you would need to back up some.

    If you go with the 50mm, just make sure you get the AF-S 50mm since the D3100 does not have a focus motor in the body. The AF 50mm (1.4 or 1.8) lens would be a manual focus only on your camera. The only problem is the AF-S 50mm is the most expensive ($459 at Adorama).
    James
    14 Yeti ARC-C and 99 Cannondale R500

  16. #16
    Ogr8nwmypstmksnosnse pgoat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    My Bikes
    1986 Trek 500, 2003 Orbea Team Euskaltel, 2005 Cannondale R1000
    Posts
    2,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by StupidlyBrave View Post
    Good high-ISO performance
    Fast lens
    Spot Metering

    I took this with a 55-300mm f4-5.6 (not fast) at ISO6400
    nice shot!
    Quote Originally Posted by jsharr View Post
    People whose sig line does not include a jsharr quote annoy me.

  17. #17
    Ogr8nwmypstmksnosnse pgoat's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    My Bikes
    1986 Trek 500, 2003 Orbea Team Euskaltel, 2005 Cannondale R1000
    Posts
    2,785
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ms.gio View Post
    In the end, forgive me for coming here to ask.
    I think you were smart to come here for photo advice - I just got back into it recently too, and I have learned so much from the talented folks here.
    Quote Originally Posted by jsharr View Post
    People whose sig line does not include a jsharr quote annoy me.

  18. #18
    Chepooka StupidlyBrave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    South Central PA
    My Bikes
    1990 Trek 1400 7spd; 2001 Litespeed Arenberg 10 speed
    Posts
    1,157
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by pgoat View Post
    nice shot!
    Thanks! About 3 dozen shots, a handful of keepers

  19. #19
    Senior Member shouldberiding's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Madison, WI
    My Bikes
    '08 Trek 7.3FX
    Posts
    812
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The 35mm is a good call. Wider would be better in the close quarters of a club, but within a reasonable price range you're not going to find a wide angle anything with a wide aperture. You'll want a prime for the wide aperture, not only for exposure but for viewfinder brightness as well. Shooting in low light with a zoom lens effectively at f5 sucks. You can barely see anything.

    I would recommend that you buy a full frame lens instead but that is going to be a lot more expensive.

    I don't know how you feel about rolling without autofocus, but you can get old Nikkor AF lenses (your camera body doesn't have the motor for these lenses) for cheap. Great glass, very little coin. With full frame you're future proof in case you upgrade or the full frame sensors trickle further down the line, which they will. The higher up Nikons ($1,000+) have the body motor for the old pre AF-S lenses, so it's not as though the autofocus on these is completely obsolete.

    A club environment is tricky. You've got a lot of fast motion and low light. Your on board flash is only effective within a few yards and falls off steeply. What you do have on your side is high ISO performance. High ISO settings in cameras nowadays are so good that you can play with shutter speed and depth of field at will (up to a point) in low light situations.

    In regards to flash, don't overdue it when you're shooting close to the subjects. Roll back the flash compensation a bit so you don't end up with a blown out foreground and a dark background. Unless that's what you want. Use the flash like depth of field to obscure or reveal parts of the frame. Use it as filler or use it as the sole light source in the shot.

    Slow shutter speed shots can look cool for the motion blur, so throw in a few of those.

    Frame wide, crop down. Shoot a lot, throw out the bad ones later.

    Extra batteries. Extra flash cards. Oh, and extra batteries.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by shouldberiding; 03-26-11 at 12:07 AM.

  20. #20
    Administrator Allen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Atomic batteries to power; turbines to speed
    My Bikes
    Salsa La Raza, Panasonic Electric, Bria, Bamboo touring, Bamboo cargo
    Posts
    4,708
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I forgot we were talking about an APS sensor, I was thinking in full frame terms. The 35 is the better of the two choices.
    As far as shooting images in a club, the lighting is tricky--a cheap flash like the Vivatar 285HV is a good workhorse for those kind of environments.
    Also once you have a few days practice and know how to get passable shots, taking candid shots in a club is one of the easier low pressure paying photo gigs.

  21. #21
    BF's Level 12 Wizard SingingSabre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    My Bikes
    Diamondback Sorrento turned Xtracycle commuter
    Posts
    1,414
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have a Sigma 17-70 which is my prime walkaround lens.

    It's a great lens, very versatile, solid at the 35mm range, great for 90% of general portraiture.

    B&H Photo link

    Honestly, I'd want to err on the side of wide because you don't know how many people you're going to need to fit in a frame. I'd go with a zoom so you don't have to use foot zoom, and I'd go with a range that had wide and portraiture ranges. The 17-70 is a sure bet. The BHPhotoVideo link is new, but I'm sure you can find the non-stabilized one used and far cheaper if you want or need to. I don't use the stabilized version.
    Shameless plug (my sites):
    Photography
    Vanity
    Quote Originally Posted by Bklyn
    Obviously, the guy's like a 12th level white wizard or something. His mere presence is a danger to mortals.

  22. #22
    2 Fat 2 Furious contango's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    England
    My Bikes
    2009 Specialized Rockhopper Comp Disc, 2009 Specialized Tricross Sport
    Posts
    3,990
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    From what I gather Sigma lenses can be a little hit-and-miss.

    I've used a few (15mm f/2.8 fisheye, 28-70mm f/2.8 EX, 70-200mm f/2.8 EX HSM, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6, and 300-800mm f/5.6 EX) and had virtually no trouble with any of them - the 28-300 had an intermittent issue with the aperture shutter sticking when it was about 7 years old, the 28-70 autofocus failed after I'd had it about three years but I bought it used so no idea how old it was by then. So from my own experience Sigma lenses are usually just fine.

    A friend of mine who is also a very keen photographer has also owned a few Sigma lenses and had so much trouble he refuses to ever buy another one. The only one he even continues to use is the 12-24mm "Popeye" lens because it's the only way he can get such a wide angle perspective without going to a fisheye.

  23. #23
    BF's Level 12 Wizard SingingSabre's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    My Bikes
    Diamondback Sorrento turned Xtracycle commuter
    Posts
    1,414
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by contango View Post
    From what I gather Sigma lenses can be a little hit-and-miss.

    I've used a few (15mm f/2.8 fisheye, 28-70mm f/2.8 EX, 70-200mm f/2.8 EX HSM, 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6, and 300-800mm f/5.6 EX) and had virtually no trouble with any of them - the 28-300 had an intermittent issue with the aperture shutter sticking when it was about 7 years old, the 28-70 autofocus failed after I'd had it about three years but I bought it used so no idea how old it was by then. So from my own experience Sigma lenses are usually just fine.

    A friend of mine who is also a very keen photographer has also owned a few Sigma lenses and had so much trouble he refuses to ever buy another one. The only one he even continues to use is the 12-24mm "Popeye" lens because it's the only way he can get such a wide angle perspective without going to a fisheye.
    So far my Sigmas are two for two. Two lenses, two awesome bang-for-your-buck lenses.
    Shameless plug (my sites):
    Photography
    Vanity
    Quote Originally Posted by Bklyn
    Obviously, the guy's like a 12th level white wizard or something. His mere presence is a danger to mortals.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Mr. Embrey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Saint Joseph, MO
    My Bikes
    1988 Cannondale ST400
    Posts
    343
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ms.gio View Post
    The following reasons why I came here:

    1) I've known the core posters here for a while.
    2) We also have a good number of photographers in the group.
    3) This was the first place that I came to after finding out.
    4) Why not go to a group with which you're comfortable in opening up a discussion that you feel that they'll have helpful advice or guidance?

    In all honesty, I was slightly intimidated in going to the flickr group and be called a noob. It's been some time since being behind the camera and I'm kinda new to the dslr world. I'm just trying to take in as much information as a I can and become a better photographer. In the end, forgive me for coming here to ask.

    btw, thank you for the links. I'll just look there.
    I never said there was anything wrong with asking here, you've received some great tips. But if you need to ask, I have to assume you've never done it. If you've never done something, how can you be a professional at it? Pro's charge, noobs practice so they can become a professional, then charge. I'd at least practice a few nights first with what you have, to help define what you need.

  25. #25
    Mr. Sparkle alpha_bravo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Sugar Land, TX
    My Bikes
    08 Specialized Allez Elite
    Posts
    536
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You've gotten good info technically, I have nothing to add in that respect.

    What I would add is that I don't think you need this advice. I assume your D3100 came with a standard range zoom lens? If so take it one night before your assignment and use it to find out what you need, both composition and speed wise. The faster your glass is the more pricey it will be. If you can get by with an f1.8 over a 1.4 you might be able to save some cash. Also, if your zoom lens is fast enough, you may not even need to be worrying about this.

    Photography's a lot like cycling, the gear is so infinitely mesmerizing. Add in the magazines, books, and how-to's which make you feel like you need it to take great pictures. That's not always the case. A good photographer would be able to walk into that club with a pinhole camera and take great pictures. I think with time and experience you will too.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •