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sknhgy 11-20-11 09:29 PM

How to keep the dog from attacking the cats
 
We recently adopted a 2 year old pit bull named Mabel. Mabel is very gentle and not at all agressive - unless you are a cat or other small animal. We have two house cats. We're trying to keep Mabel from going after the cats.
Mabel was abandoned last spring. Some friends of ours who live on a farm took her in but didn't want to keep her because she would go after the chickens. Since we brought Mabel here she has dug up and killed some moles in the yard, which is just fine by me.
Whoever abandoned Mabel seems to have house trained her well. She likes to spend time in her cage. That's where we have to keep her when we are away from the house. She's a good dog, and she's never had a accident in the house, and she is very personable and loving. The only problem is with the cats. If we are sitting with her and a cat goes by she will stare at it but she won't go after it if we tell her not to. However, if she is unsupervised and a cat gets in proximity to her she will try to catch it. I'm afraid that she could hurt or kill one of these cats if we didn't intervene.
Anyone know if it's possible to train her to leave the cats alone? I thought about getting a shock collar. Any help would be appreciated.

AEO 11-20-11 10:06 PM

probably should give a bit more time for the dog to get used to the new house and current occupants.
and you need to teach the dog who is higher up on the command.

skijor 11-20-11 10:33 PM

Attach something with your scent and the cats' scent to Mabel's collar. Use odor as a training tool. She'll learn to respect the cats as she does you. Or she'll eat all three of you.

RaleighSport 11-20-11 10:35 PM

Seems odd to me.. whenever I've brought a dog home the cat(s) always establish dominance from day 1... minute 1 if they can help it, hope things work out for you though!

RubenX 11-20-11 11:22 PM

enroll kitty in feline ninjutsu school:

http://erroraccessdenied.com/files/images/ninja-cat.jpg

Tom Stormcrowe 11-21-11 05:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sknhgy (Post 13515720)
We recently adopted a 2 year old pit bull named Mabel. Mabel is very gentle and not at all agressive - unless you are a cat or other small animal. We have two house cats. We're trying to keep Mabel from going after the cats.
Mabel was abandoned last spring. Some friends of ours who live on a farm took her in but didn't want to keep her because she would go after the chickens. Since we brought Mabel here she has dug up and killed some moles in the yard, which is just fine by me.
Whoever abandoned Mabel seems to have house trained her well. She likes to spend time in her cage. That's where we have to keep her when we are away from the house. She's a good dog, and she's never had a accident in the house, and she is very personable and loving. The only problem is with the cats. If we are sitting with her and a cat goes by she will stare at it but she won't go after it if we tell her not to. However, if she is unsupervised and a cat gets in proximity to her she will try to catch it. I'm afraid that she could hurt or kill one of these cats if we didn't intervene.
Anyone know if it's possible to train her to leave the cats alone? I thought about getting a shock collar. Any help would be appreciated.

Problem 1: Cats are just the right size to trigger her prey-hunting/killing reflex.

sknhgy 11-21-11 08:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 13516328)
Problem 1: Cats are just the right size to trigger her prey-hunting/killing reflex.

Mabel seems to have a strong hunting instinct. I need to know how to get her to recognize that the cats aren't prey.

ahsposo 11-21-11 09:10 AM

I say let nature take it's course.

A dog's gotta do what a dog's gotta do.

You might be surprised at the outcome. We have a cat that all of the neighborhood dogs are terrified of. They bark at her but keep their distance after their initial encounter with her claws.

stevemtbr 11-21-11 09:17 AM

Try a shock collar, one that has adjustable settings. Try it at the lowest setting first and work up as needed. When she goes for your cat give him a shock that way she'll know that when she chases the cat it will hurt. We rescued a dog a few months ago and we had that same problem. After a few shocks problem has been solved no more prey induced chasing and they have started to actually play now.

dcrowell 11-21-11 09:32 AM

Arm the cats.

dcrowell 11-21-11 09:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dcrowell (Post 13516965)
Arm the cats.

On second thought, maybe not. That could lead to revolution.

Tom Stormcrowe 11-21-11 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sknhgy (Post 13516791)
Mabel seems to have a strong hunting instinct. I need to know how to get her to recognize that the cats aren't prey.

Try a squirt bottle, every time she goes after the cat. That or a rattle can. Both are nonphysical punitive actions that work well without harming the dog. That way, she won't learn that your hand can hurt her, for one thing. They both operate on her startle reflex to stop an action immediately.

stevemtbr 11-21-11 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 13517130)
Try a squirt bottle, every time she goes after the cat. That or a rattle can. Both are nonphysical punitive actions that work well without harming the dog. That way, she won't learn that your hand can hurt her, for one thing. They both operate on her startle reflex to stop an action immediately.

I should of added that we did try the rattle can and squirt bottle. Both didn't work. The rattle can made all the animals think they were in trouble and would all go scurrying.

ModoVincere 11-21-11 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 13517130)
Try a squirt bottle, every time she goes after the cat. That or a rattle can. Both are nonphysical punitive actions that work well without harming the dog. That way, she won't learn that your hand can hurt her, for one thing. They both operate on her startle reflex to stop an action immediately.

This
Couple it with some treats when she doesn't attack the cat. Positive and negative reinforcement.

jsharr 11-21-11 10:32 AM

sell the cats, or give them away, since nobody in their right mind would ever buy a cat, new or used.

ModoVincere 11-21-11 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsharr (Post 13517163)
sell the cats, or give them away, since nobody in their right mind would ever buy a cat, new or used.

I hear they like them in China. :innocent:

Tom Stormcrowe 11-21-11 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stevemtbr (Post 13517149)
I should of added that we did try the rattle can and squirt bottle. Both didn't work. The rattle can made all the animals think they were in trouble and would all go scurrying.


Are your cats fully armed with all claws? If so, maybe you should let the dog find out the hard way about cat claws. My Aunt's German Shepard/Husky mix, as well as our neighbors Mastiff both fear Annie with a deep, heartfelt respect for her claws.


It's truly funny watching a 200 pound Mastiff slink by our back porch with a watchful eye for a 20 pound cat.

sknhgy 11-21-11 10:50 AM

I thought about getting a shock collar.

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/remote-...l-collar-25876

sknhgy 11-21-11 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 13517213)
Are your cats fully armed with all claws? If so, maybe you should let the dog find out the hard way about cat claws. My Aunt's German Shepard/Husky mix, as well as our neighbors Mastiff both fear Annie with a deep, heartfelt respect for her claws.


It's truly funny watching a 200 pound Mastiff slink by our back porch with a watchful eye for a 20 pound cat.

Our cats are both armed with claws. In fact, Sadie left a claw in Mabel's ear one time.
Some dogs will back down from a cat. Some won't. Mabel is nice, but she is very tough. She could easily kill a cat. Her nickname at the farm was Hercules.

bikebuddha 11-21-11 10:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom Stormcrowe (Post 13516328)
Problem 1: Cats are just the right size to trigger her prey-hunting/killing reflex.

Right my dog is fine with my daughter's cat, until the cat starts running around. Then dog goes into hunt mode and chaos erupts.

Siu Blue Wind 11-21-11 10:56 AM

I have two dogs over 150lbs and one dog that is 65lbs. How I did it was to sit on the couch with the cat in my arms and the dog next to me. I would hold the cat in my left arm and pet the dog near the collar with my right dominant hand. I'd slowly bring the cat closer as the dog would sniff the cat. Any kind of jumpy action on the dog would quickly be resolved by my hand on the collar. Of course the cat would swat but the dog would still be still be restrained with a firm "NO". I did this for about three days, for about 45 mins each time, about three times a day. Now they share a water bowl. And the dogs are afraid of the three cats.

Here's one of the cats right before he stole the bone from my 65lb coyote/lab mix.

http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o.../catanddog.jpg

ModoVincere 11-21-11 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Siu Blue Wind (Post 13517260)
I have two dogs over 150lbs and one dog that is 65lbs. How I did it was to sit on the couch with the cat in my arms and the dog next to me. I would hold the cat in my left arm and pet the dog near the collar with my right dominant hand. I'd slowly bring the cat closer as the dog would sniff the cat. Any kind of jumpy action on the dog would quickly be resolved by my hand on the collar. Of course the cat would swat but the dog would still be still be restrained with a firm "NO". I did this for about three days, for about 45 mins each time, about three times a day. Now they share a water bowl. And the dogs are afraid of the three cats.

Here's one of the cats right before he stole the bone from my 65lb coyote/lab mix.

http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o.../catanddog.jpg

So...you purposely invited evil into your house and exposed the lovely dogs to it.
nice.

HardyWeinberg 11-21-11 11:03 AM

Time to replace the cats' bacon-collars.

spry 11-21-11 11:52 AM

Keep the cats safe in sealed tupperware till you get home.

Keith99 11-21-11 12:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skijor (Post 13515892)
Attach something with your scent and the cats' scent to Mabel's collar. Use odor as a training tool. She'll learn to respect the cats as she does you. Or she'll eat all three of you.

I like this one. I've never had the problem of Dogs and cats not getting along. Which is a bit strange as at one point I had ot bring a friend's dog home from college, a dog that chased cats and we had a cat that took on and terrified 2 weimaraners. They got on just fine from day one (Somewhere I even have a photo of that dog, that cat and Ismael the squirel I rescued getting along fine).

Wheatley got on fine with cats and rats, which is strange as he had been on the street and to this day goes balistic at the sight of a squirel.

The only thing that makes any sense to me is that dogs react a lot based on the pack, and they accept other species into the pack. Once in the pack an animal is not just safe, but is to be defended.

I think scent is a good start, if the cat smells right yuo are half way there.


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