Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Foo Off-Topic chit chat with no general subject.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-05-12, 10:38 AM   #26
More Cowbell
Lanterne Rouge
 
More Cowbell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: St. Paul
Bikes:
Posts: 123
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Why do the British drink warm beer? They have Lucas refrigerators.
More Cowbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-12, 05:50 PM   #27
Indy_Rider
Banned
 
Indy_Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: On a boat
Bikes: 2000 Fisher Paragon, 2005 Giant OCR2, 2006 Bianchi SASS, numerous others
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For the life of me, I will never understand why people say Land Rovers are good vehicles. To me, the first part in being a good vehicle is reliability, with out that, it's a POS regardless of what it looks like or might be capable of when it does run.
Indy_Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-12, 11:18 AM   #28
eofelis 
The Rock Cycle
 
eofelis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Western Colorado
Bikes: Salsa Vaya Ti, Specialized Ruby, Gunnar Sport, Motobecane Fantom CXX, Jamis Dragon, Novara Randonee x2
Posts: 1,661
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
A couple of years ago my bf and I were riding around town on our bikes and came across a guy and his family with their broken down (newish) Land Rover along the side of the road. We stopped to see if they were ok. He was waiting for some help to show up that he had called for. He said the vehicle was "quirky." We went on our way.

One of my Pandora stations plays commercials for a "Land Rover Roaring Fork" dealer (Glenwood Springs, CO) all the time.

I'm on my 3rd Subaru. All of them have been pretty reliable.
__________________
Gunnar Sport
Specialized Ruby
Salsa Vaya Ti
Novara Randonee x2
Motobecane Fantom CXX
Jamis Dakar XCR
eofelis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-12, 12:33 PM   #29
bikebuddha 
Senior Member
 
bikebuddha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Somewhere in time
Bikes:
Posts: 1,137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm probably in the minority but I love old Range Rovers. If you're handy and like working on trucks go for it. If not, forget it. With Land Rovers it's death by a thousand cuts, not usually big ones but plenty of them.
__________________
The few, the proud, the likely insane, Metro-Atlanta bicycle commuters.
bikebuddha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-12, 01:00 PM   #30
Indy_Rider
Banned
 
Indy_Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: On a boat
Bikes: 2000 Fisher Paragon, 2005 Giant OCR2, 2006 Bianchi SASS, numerous others
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bikebuddha View Post
I'm probably in the minority but I love old Range Rovers. If you're handy and like working on trucks go for it. If not, forget it. With Land Rovers it's death by a thousand cuts, not usually big ones but plenty of them.
I would rather go with an a real classic like an International Scout over a Rover in that case.
Indy_Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-12, 01:07 PM   #31
bikebuddha 
Senior Member
 
bikebuddha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Somewhere in time
Bikes:
Posts: 1,137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Indy_Rider View Post
I would rather go with an a real classic like an International Scout over a Rover in that case.
Good luck finding one, they're as rare as hens teeth around here.
__________________
The few, the proud, the likely insane, Metro-Atlanta bicycle commuters.
bikebuddha is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 04:32 AM   #32
jhota
blithering idiot
 
jhota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: beautiful coastal South Carolina
Bikes: 1991 Trek 930, 2005 Bianchi Eros, 2006 Nashbar "X," IRO Rob Roy
Posts: 1,263
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
I don't remember people using the terms "economical" or "reliable" when discussing English car back in the late 70's/early 80's when I was driving sports cars, unless they owned one and were saying something like "my next car is going to be more reliable/economical".
nobody made reliable cars in the 70s and 80s, except for the Japanese.

a British classic can be just as reliable and durable as an American or other European classic car. the single greatest problem is ham-fisted "mechanics" who create more problems than they solve.

the much-maligned British electrical systems, for example, use a different set of design philosophies than US automakers used. because of this, they function in a different fashion, with different part requirements. most Americans are unaware of this, and not smart enough to take it to a specialist. this leads to cooked wiring and electrical components due to improper repair, all of which gets blamed on the car (instead of the mechanic's ignorance).
jhota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 09:39 AM   #33
redneckwes
Super Course fan
 
redneckwes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Lost on the windswept plains of the Great Black Swamp
Bikes:
Posts: 2,715
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Two problems with IH Scouts, and I am a fan of all things IH.

Rust....everything rusts, the frames are especially prone to rusting out, not just surface rust, structural corrosion.

Parts, orphan powerplants that have been out of production for 30+ years.

Best to stick with a Jeep, sure they rust just as badly, but at least you can find every replacement part you can imagine.
__________________
http://bicyclenut.bravehost.com/Bicy...nt%20page.html

The last two bikes on my list are a 50's Lenton Grand Prix and a '64 Raleigh Record.
redneckwes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 09:53 AM   #34
Siu Blue Wind
Flowers for mom
 
Siu Blue Wind's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 10,978
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Certain Jeep models have their share of maintenance issues too. But then again I'm talking about the situations I see while off roading. I really can't say how many Jeeps we had to rescue.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buddha
We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.
Quote:
Originally Posted by making View Post
Please dont outsmart the censor. That is a very expensive censor and every time one of you guys outsmart it it makes someone at the home office feel bad. We dont wanna do that. So dont cleverly disguise bad words.
Siu Blue Wind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 10:03 AM   #35
no motor?
Senior Member
 
no motor?'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Bikes: Specialized Hardrock
Posts: 4,953
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 69 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhota View Post
nobody made reliable cars in the 70s and 80s, except for the Japanese.

a British classic can be just as reliable and durable as an American or other European classic car. the single greatest problem is ham-fisted "mechanics" who create more problems than they solve.

the much-maligned British electrical systems, for example, use a different set of design philosophies than US automakers used. because of this, they function in a different fashion, with different part requirements. most Americans are unaware of this, and not smart enough to take it to a specialist. this leads to cooked wiring and electrical components due to improper repair, all of which gets blamed on the car (instead of the mechanic's ignorance).
Yeah, but most of the British cars of that era weren't meticulously maintained by factory trained mechanics, they were maintained like other cars of that era were by the owners or mechanics who worked at service stations. Which resulted in a large pool of British cars that didn't run, or didn't run right for too long, generating (pun intended) a reputation of unreliability.

Most of my friends that ride vintage British bikes really like them, and have had them long enough to be able to compensate for all their mechanical and electrical shortcomings and don't ride them daily. They've got the right mindset for that kind of vehicle now, just like your customers must have. The people that didn't share that mindset have all given up and moved on to some blander transportation appliance.
no motor? is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 03:15 PM   #36
Indy_Rider
Banned
 
Indy_Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: On a boat
Bikes: 2000 Fisher Paragon, 2005 Giant OCR2, 2006 Bianchi SASS, numerous others
Posts: 56
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by bikebuddha View Post
Good luck finding one, they're as rare as hens teeth around here.
You can find them around here, at this point, most don't leave the garage to often though.
Indy_Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 06:15 PM   #37
patentcad
Peloton Shelter Dog
 
patentcad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Chester, NY
Bikes: 2013 Scott Foil, 2016 Scott Addict, 2015 Scott Scale 700SL MTB
Posts: 59,534
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 152 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by More Cowbell View Post
Why do the British drink warm beer? They have Lucas refrigerators.
That joke was old in the 1970's.
patentcad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 06:17 PM   #38
patentcad
Peloton Shelter Dog
 
patentcad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Chester, NY
Bikes: 2013 Scott Foil, 2016 Scott Addict, 2015 Scott Scale 700SL MTB
Posts: 59,534
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 152 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jhota View Post
nobody made reliable cars in the 70s and 80s, except for the Japanese.

a British classic can be just as reliable and durable as an American or other European classic car. the single greatest problem is ham-fisted "mechanics" who create more problems than they solve.
The degree to which this is misleading and inaccurate cannot be over stated. While cars were far less reliable 25-40 years ago than they are today, British cars always sucked MUCH harder than just about any other car. Don't tell me Fredly, I was there, we had a couple in my family, and I sold Jags and Range Rovers in the 80's. Fantastic cars, but they didn't run very well.
patentcad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 09:48 PM   #39
jhota
blithering idiot
 
jhota's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: beautiful coastal South Carolina
Bikes: 1991 Trek 930, 2005 Bianchi Eros, 2006 Nashbar "X," IRO Rob Roy
Posts: 1,263
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
the 80s were the absolute nadir for Jaguar build quality. condemning British cars based on the reliability of those cars is foolish. i'm on my second Jaguar, but not that long ago (well, 15 years or so) our entire household fleet was British. one Land Rover, three Jaguars and a Triumph. and we weren't walking to work.

the Landie was the worst British car we've ever had, and even it ran 170k miles before we got rid of it. my first Jag had over 220k when the guy who owned it after me stuffed it in a ditch.

we still have the Triumph. Dad bought it new in '69, and it spent almost a decade as his daily driver.

the '78 MGB i ran for several years as my daily driver was no less reliable than my '01 VW is. my old Honda trumps them both, making 330k miles before i scrapped it, but it was built in '89 (during Honda's best recent period of design and production quality).

but then, the first car i ever bought with my own money was French (1976 Peugeot 504). so my perceptions may be a bit skewed.
jhota is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 09:49 PM   #40
spry
location:northern Ohio
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 3,586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by patentcad View Post
The degree to which this is misleading and inaccurate cannot be over stated. While cars were far less reliable 25-40 years ago than they are today, British cars always sucked MUCH harder than just about any other car. Don't tell me Fredly, I was there, we had a couple in my family, and I sold Jags and Range Rovers in the 80's. Fantastic cars, but they didn't run very well.
This is why the Limeys always included a tool kit in those new British Leyland rust buckets.After the 1st year you could stop a MG Midget Fred Flintstone style by putting your feet through the floor and on the pavement.
Their engines had such loose fitting piston rings you could make Cleveland look like London fog by driving through downtown.
spry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-12, 09:54 PM   #41
spry
location:northern Ohio
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Bikes:
Posts: 3,586
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by patentcad View Post
The degree to which this is misleading and inaccurate cannot be over stated. While cars were far less reliable 25-40 years ago than they are today, British cars always sucked MUCH harder than just about any other car. Don't tell me Fredly, I was there, we had a couple in my family, and I sold Jags and Range Rovers in the 80's. Fantastic cars, but they didn't run very well.
They do run well nowadays,on a trailer to a car show looking for the next chump.
spry is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:50 AM.