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Old 08-28-12, 04:07 AM   #1
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How Do Europeans Say the Time?

Considering that the countries of Europe uses the 24-hour format compared to the United States (which is where I live in), how do Europeans say the time? So if it's 17:15 written in text, do they say "it's seventeen fifteen?" What about 15:00 as written in text? Do they say "it's fifteen hundred hours?"

Since I'm living in the US, I've gotten used to 24-hour format, but I spoke in 12-hour format because (while I didn't mean to make assumptions) most people got so used to the 12-hour format anyway, because if I say "it's seventeen fifteen," they would think of it as a military time but I don't.

The reason why I ask is I'm curious about other cultures from different parts of Europe and specifically how they used to say the time. To me, it's like going with the metrics system instead of the imperial system (kilometers, meters, and centimeters versus miles, yards, feet, and inches), but unlike the time format, I think it's hard to do away with the imperial measurements. Maybe it's because of the mindset of the North Americans? Oh, yes. I did use "North Americans," but I know that Canadians use the metric system for measurement but I don't care to live in Canada as I'm not interested in it. I'm more of a guy who likes to explore western European countries like Italy and France.
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Old 08-28-12, 08:30 AM   #2
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Considering that the countries of Europe uses the 24-hour format compared to the United States (which is where I live in), how do Europeans say the time? So if it's 17:15 written in text, do they say "it's seventeen fifteen?" What about 15:00 as written in text? Do they say "it's fifteen hundred hours?"

Since I'm living in the US, I've gotten used to 24-hour format, but I spoke in 12-hour format because (while I didn't mean to make assumptions) most people got so used to the 12-hour format anyway, because if I say "it's seventeen fifteen," they would think of it as a military time but I don't.

The reason why I ask is I'm curious about other cultures from different parts of Europe and specifically how they used to say the time. To me, it's like going with the metrics system instead of the imperial system (kilometers, meters, and centimeters versus miles, yards, feet, and inches), but unlike the time format, I think it's hard to do away with the imperial measurements. Maybe it's because of the mindset of the North Americans? Oh, yes. I did use "North Americans," but I know that Canadians use the metric system for measurement but I don't care to live in Canada as I'm not interested in it. I'm more of a guy who likes to explore western European countries like Italy and France.
This is the first I've heard of this. The only difference I can tell you is that in Britain most people say half past/to or a quarter past/to.

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Old 08-28-12, 08:40 AM   #3
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They just refer to the morning hours like we do—9:00, 10:00, 11:43, etc. At noon they write 12:00, and when it gets to be 1pm they write 13:00, and then go take a nap (you gotta love riposo/siesta). Dinner may take place any time from 17:00 (Britain's 5pm repast) to 22:30 (Spain's 10:30pm feast).

When speaking, however, Europeans might use either the 24-hour-clock number, or a 12-hour-clock number followed by the phrase (in local lingo) "in the afternoon"—so at 3pm, they may say "it's fifteen o'clock" (or, more usually, just "it's fifteen") or they might say "it's three in the afternoon."
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Old 08-28-12, 08:42 AM   #4
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I am not sure that European countries use a 24-hour format any more or less than we do. They do, however, write their dates differently, with the day before the month, such as 28/8/2012 instead of 8/28/2012. Maybe the OP is confusing those things?

I asked my wife, who lived in France for some time, about the time format and she has no idea what the OP is talking about.
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Old 08-28-12, 08:44 AM   #5
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They just refer to the morning hours like we do—9:00, 10:00, 11:43, etc. At noon they write 12:00, and when it gets to be 1pm they write 13:00, and then go take a nap (you gotta love riposo/siesta). Dinner may take place any time from 17:00 (Britain's 5pm repast) to 22:30 (Spain's 10:30pm feast).

When speaking, however, Europeans might use either the 24-hour-clock number, or a 12-hour-clock number followed by the phrase (in local lingo) "in the afternoon"—so at 3pm, they may say "it's fifteen o'clock" (or, more usually, just "it's fifteen") or they might say "it's three in the afternoon."
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Old 08-28-12, 08:48 AM   #6
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Training in france they wrote the number like 17:00 but spoke it like we do; 5 in the afternoon.
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Old 08-28-12, 09:09 AM   #7
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Only on days that end in y
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Old 08-28-12, 09:31 AM   #8
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How Do Europeans and Say Time?
In Spain: Que hora es?
In Italy: Che ora ?
In Greek: Τι ώρα είναι?
In France: Quelle heure est-il?
In England: What time is it?
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Old 08-28-12, 09:53 AM   #9
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in spain: Que hora es?
In italy: Che ora ?
In greek: Τι ώρα είναι?
In france: Quelle heure est-il?
In england: What's the harry lime?
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Old 08-28-12, 10:59 AM   #10
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How would the phrase "it's 5 o'clock somewhere" be translated into eurospeak?
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Old 08-28-12, 11:22 AM   #11
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How would the phrase "it's 5 o'clock somewhere" be translated into eurospeak?
In England that would be "it's 5 o'clock somewhere, init"
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Old 08-28-12, 11:34 AM   #12
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Considering that the countries of Europe uses the 24-hour format compared to the United States (which is where I live in), how do Europeans say the time? So if it's 17:15 written in text, do they say "it's seventeen fifteen?" What about 15:00 as written in text? Do they say "it's fifteen hundred hours?"

Since I'm living in the US, I've gotten used to 24-hour format, but I spoke in 12-hour format because (while I didn't mean to make assumptions) most people got so used to the 12-hour format anyway, because if I say "it's seventeen fifteen," they would think of it as a military time but I don't.

The reason why I ask is I'm curious about other cultures from different parts of Europe and specifically how they used to say the time. To me, it's like going with the metrics system instead of the imperial system (kilometers, meters, and centimeters versus miles, yards, feet, and inches), but unlike the time format, I think it's hard to do away with the imperial measurements. Maybe it's because of the mindset of the North Americans? Oh, yes. I did use "North Americans," but I know that Canadians use the metric system for measurement but I don't care to live in Canada as I'm not interested in it. I'm more of a guy who likes to explore western European countries like Italy and France.
In England if you ask me the time right now I'd say it's half past six. According to my PC clock it's 18:31 as I type this but most people don't care about the odd minute and I figure you already know it's half past six in the afternoon rather than half past six in the morning.

If I'm discussing things like flight times with friends I'll talk about an evening flight that leaves at half nine. If I'm discussing my flight reservation before I hand over my credit card number the time is twenty-one-thirty local time, landing at oh-seven-fifteen local time. When I'm booking my flight I don't want Mr **ckup to make an appearance, when I'm discussing my flight with friends it doesn't matter if they get the wrong idea. If I'm telling someone the time and they can't remember whether it's currently morning or evening that's their problem.
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Old 08-28-12, 11:38 AM   #13
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I am not sure that European countries use a 24-hour format any more or less than we do. They do, however, write their dates differently, with the day before the month, such as 28/8/2012 instead of 8/28/2012. Maybe the OP is confusing those things?

I asked my wife, who lived in France for some time, about the time format and she has no idea what the OP is talking about.
Maybe that's it, I wasn't aware we used the 24-hour system any more in the UK than you guys do in the US. It's used for timetables, some shops display their opening hours as "0900 - 1700" but some just say "9 - 5" figuring people can figure out that it means 9am until 5pm.

Dates are a bit odd. I don't understand why the US has its rather curious format. dd-mm-yy makes sense, starting with the smallest unit and moving towards the largest. The Japanese way of yy-mm-dd makes sense, if anything it makes more sense because a simple sort will put everything into date order automatically. The US approach of mm-dd-yy just seems odd. Using words it makes little difference whether the date says "28 Aug, 2012" or "Aug 28, 2012" but in numbers it just seems odd to me.
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Old 08-28-12, 11:38 AM   #14
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In England if you ask me the time right now I'd say it's half past six. According to my PC clock it's 18:31 as I type this but most people don't care about the odd minute and I figure you already know it's half past six in the afternoon rather than half past six in the morning.

If I'm discussing things like flight times with friends I'll talk about an evening flight that leaves at half nine. If I'm discussing my flight reservation before I hand over my credit card number the time is twenty-one-thirty local time, landing at oh-seven-fifteen local time. When I'm booking my flight I don't want Mr **ckup to make an appearance, when I'm discussing my flight with friends it doesn't matter if they get the wrong idea. If I'm telling someone the time and they can't remember whether it's currently morning or evening that's their problem.
I think you mean In England if you ask me the time right now I'd say it's half past six, init mate.
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Old 08-28-12, 02:01 PM   #15
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In England that would be "it's 5 o'clock somewhere, init"
At least it would be Guiness time and not Miller time.
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Old 08-28-12, 05:06 PM   #16
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According to Eckhart Tolle, a european, it's always NOW!
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Old 08-28-12, 05:11 PM   #17
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In England that would be "it's 5 o'clock somewhere, init"
*sounds of a bottle being opened and poured* "Mmmm breakfast!"
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Old 08-28-12, 05:22 PM   #18
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I think you mean In England if you ask me the time right now I'd say it's half past six, init mate.
Depends whether you ask someone who's trying to sound like a Cockney or not.
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Old 08-30-12, 07:48 AM   #19
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Old 08-30-12, 08:11 AM   #20
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Depends whether you ask someone who's trying to sound like a Cockney or not.
That's how my nephews would say it. I still say half past and quarter to. I always say a quarter over here, Americans say a fourth.
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Old 08-30-12, 08:16 AM   #21
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That's how my nephews would say it. I still say half past and quarter to. I always say a quarter over here, Americans say a fourth.
Do they? Most Americans I've heard have said "quarter after two" or "quarter til two" where I'd say "quarter past" or "quarter to"
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Old 08-30-12, 08:28 AM   #22
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Do they? Most Americans I've heard have said "quarter after two" or "quarter til two" where I'd say "quarter past" or "quarter to"
That's what I say too.
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Old 08-30-12, 09:04 AM   #23
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That's what I say too.
Yeah, the Amish say stuff weird like that.
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Old 08-30-12, 09:05 AM   #24
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I guess it depends what part of America you are in. We should have a poll
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Old 08-30-12, 09:10 AM   #25
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I am a texican, so the following is not germain to the discussion at hand, but I really don't care. I say the hour and then the minute. I tend to round to the next highest multiple of 5. six oh five, six ten, six fifteen, etc. Seldom if ever say half past, quarter past, quarter til, etc. Also, just use the 12 hour format and append with AM or PM or morning, evening, etc. as needed.
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