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-   -   My snow cherry has been popped (http://www.bikeforums.net/foo/925108-my-snow-cherry-has-been-popped.html)

ahsposo 12-07-13 07:28 PM

I thought the low temperatures automatically let about about half the air out.

Zinger 12-07-13 07:52 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ahsposo (Post 16310611)
I thought the low temperatures automatically let about about half the air out.

http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=354257

You want them a bit more like this.

Will G 12-07-13 08:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zinger (Post 16310513)
Letting about half the air out of the driving tires, temporarily, will help as well.

Used to do that all the time down in Odessa TX sandland. Also gets me over snowy passes that are supposed to be closed to unchained tires.

Great idea! Didn't think of that. Allegedly, the main highways are in okay shape, I just have to survive getting out of our neighborhood.

jdon 12-07-13 09:26 PM

Problem in warm weather areas is that the ground is not not frozen. The ice beneath the snow is wet, especially when pressure from the weight of the car is applied. This is what makes it more slippery than in cold weather areas.

Letting air out of the tires usually results in improper surface contact. I doubt there is a tire or car manufacturer that would recommend that practice and I am quite sure their testing has found optimum tire pressures.

Zinger 12-07-13 10:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdon (Post 16310850)
Letting air out of the tires usually results in improper surface contact. I doubt there is a tire or car manufacturer that would recommend that practice and I am quite sure their testing has found optimum tire pressures.

Well you don't want to let that much out and you don't want to run on radial tires for long that way. Just enough to get you unstuck. As soon as I'm over a mountain pass that's supposed to be closed to unchained tires I stop at the 1st opportunity to air them back up some.

I'm sure the tire makers wouldn't approve but they don't have to get you out of the ice....you do.

overthehillmedi 12-09-13 07:36 PM

If you thought it got gad awful cold in the hood lately try these temperatures. Just a tad past nippy.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/1...n_4415564.html

skijor 12-10-13 01:29 AM

Your snow cherry hasn't truly been popped until you've been in one of these fiascos. I couldn't help but hear the Benny Hill theme song as I watched this...from yesterday morning ~20mi NW of Milwaukee.


Artkansas 12-10-13 07:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overthehillmedi (Post 16316165)
If you thought it got gad awful cold in the hood lately try these temperatures. Just a tad past nippy.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/1...n_4415564.html

-135 :eek: ... degrees F.

I was getting tired of these "you don't know cold unless..." quips. No one here lives where Nitrogen freezes (−346 F) as far as I know. :rolleyes: And that's not even approaching -459.67 F which is absolute zero. None of us really know cold. ;)

Artkansas 12-10-13 08:25 AM

Here's how real men handle snow. With a pulse jet.


bigbenaugust 12-10-13 09:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skijor (Post 16316978)
Your snow cherry hasn't truly been popped until you've been in one of these fiascos. I couldn't help but hear the Benny Hill theme song as I watched this...from yesterday morning ~20mi NW of Milwaukee.


One would think that people in Wisconsin would have a better handle on snow driving. Hmm.

Slow friggin' down, people!

Will G 12-10-13 11:04 AM

Crazy people on 4 wheels...got to value the entertainment. On day 3 of the winter ice hostage crisis here in TX, my wife and I were out walking...well, more like sliding since the snow had now frozen solid with a slick top. There are some steep hills in the neighborhood and some dude with a 4 wheel drive truck comes motoring up a hill. Looks like he is doing okay until he hits the steepest segment and the wheels just spin. He stops. The truck isn't moving. But, he makes the mistake of backing up which aids gravity just enough so that, when he locks up the brakes again, he just keeps sliding. He disappeared from view going downhill backwards and gaining speed. No crunch was heard so I didn't see the need to slip/slide my way a couple hundred yards to assess the result. Sunny today so I think the icecapades are over and I'll finish with only falling down 3 times.

no motor? 12-10-13 12:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigbenaugust (Post 16317460)
One would think that people in Wisconsin would have a better handle on snow driving. Hmm.

Slow friggin' down, people!

There was another big accident like that on Sunday too, this time south of Milwaukee.

no motor? 12-10-13 12:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Will G (Post 16317812)
Crazy people on 4 wheels...got to value the entertainment. On day 3 of the winter ice hostage crisis here in TX, my wife and I were out walking...well, more like sliding since the snow had now frozen solid with a slick top. There are some steep hills in the neighborhood and some dude with a 4 wheel drive truck comes motoring up a hill. Looks like he is doing okay until he hits the steepest segment and the wheels just spin. He stops. The truck isn't moving. But, he makes the mistake of backing up which aids gravity just enough so that, when he locks up the brakes again, he just keeps sliding. He disappeared from view going downhill backwards and gaining speed. No crunch was heard so I didn't see the need to slip/slide my way a couple hundred yards to assess the result. Sunny today so I think the icecapades are over and I'll finish with only falling down 3 times.

I stopped just below the top of a hill during an ice storm in Dallas, right next to a big honking 4wd pickup. I went forward (in my Mazda) and he went backwards when the light changed and I think he ended up waiting for help with the other pickup owners at the bottom of the hill.

Sixty Fiver 12-10-13 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jdon (Post 16310850)
Problem in warm weather areas is that the ground is not not frozen. The ice beneath the snow is wet, especially when pressure from the weight of the car is applied. This is what makes it more slippery than in cold weather areas.

Letting air out of the tires usually results in improper surface contact. I doubt there is a tire or car manufacturer that would recommend that practice and I am quite sure their testing has found optimum tire pressures.

The Nokian winter tyres on my car have a wider operating range than most tyres... 32-45 psi IIRC.

They handle winter roads exceptionally well and I usually out accelerate those bozos in pick up trucks and bet my car handles better in everything but really deep snow where the lower clearance could cause it to bottom out.

RPK79 12-10-13 03:06 PM

I bought a '04 Chrysler 300m over the summer and I'm really liking it for winter driving so far. It's the first car I've ever owned where the traction control and ABS actually work as intended.


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