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-   -   suggestion for new cordless drill? (http://www.bikeforums.net/foo/925434-suggestion-new-cordless-drill.html)

bjtesch 12-09-13 12:18 AM

suggestion for new cordless drill?
 
I have a 14.4V DeWalt that I've had for 10-12 years. It has worked great for my occasional use but the batteries are finally dead. I can buy new batteries but they are expensive, or I can buy a whole new drill/batteries/charger for less money with Christmas sales going on. A couple of off-brand batteries on ebay or amazon would be about $70, rebuilding my current batteries with new cells would be about the same amount.

Or I can buy a new 18V or 20V drill on sale for $100 or less. I'm real tempted to buy the new DeWalt 20V Lithium but I'm not sure about Lithium battery use in cordless tools. (I realize that cellphones and laptop computers are mostly Lithium.) A few years ago I bought a set of Rigid tools on sale at HomeDepot, and the Lithium batteries have been worthless on those from the start. The batteries supposedly have a lifetime warranty but they have enough loopholes that they get out of the warranty. So I have yet another drill plus impact driver and reciprocating saw that are worthless.

I would like to buy a new drill that I can count on to work for a long time, and have manufacturer support. I see DeWalt, Hitachi, Bostich, Milwaukee, Bosch and Makita selling drills that look similar, for similar prices. I'm not sure if any of these can match the quality of DeWalt, and I'm not sure if Lithium batteries can match the performance life of NiCad batteries even with all of their shortcomings.

I intend to find a way to get at least one battery for my old DeWalt 14.4V just because I can't stand to see it go to waste, and I'm going to continue trying to get warranty replacement for the Rigid batteries. But I could also justify buying a nice new drill with new batteries.

Another thing I've thought about- there are a few small drills on the market with 12V batteries. These would be advantageous sometimes around the house even though they won't drive the big stuff like the big drills. So another option is to buy a new 12V drill and get new batteries for my older big drills.

jdon 12-09-13 12:20 AM

Milwaukee.

skijor 12-09-13 12:55 AM

I've had my 18V Dewalt lithium ion driver/drill combo for a couple years. I wouldn't hesitate getting them again. I don't use them too much. But when I do, the power is there. And that's after sitting for months without being recharged. Granted, I am not building anything (drywalling or other heavy/frequent use stuff)...just usually odds and ends type projects.

Artkansas 12-09-13 01:20 AM

Never runs out of batteries.

http://www.colourbox.com/preview/290...background.jpg

Will G 12-09-13 06:23 AM

i have successfully replaced a battery under warranty with Rigid. You say you want a portable drill you can use for a long time. Any rechargeable battery has a limited life cycle. My one success with Rigid does not a trend make. If I had a problem getting it replaced, I'd probably go with the disposable concept and buy something cheaper. How about a corded drill?

bikeguyinvenice 12-09-13 06:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Artkansas (Post 16313602)

Well you beat me to it, but I got an even better one.
http://www.etsy.com/listing/10483034...FfPm7AodMC0Aww

Michigander 12-09-13 08:18 AM

Get the new Dewalt! I'm running a 20vmax impact as well as its 12 volt vmax counterpart drill daily, and have been for 4 months straight, and I am very impressed by their performance, especially the batteries. They are in fact superior to nicads because of charge capacity and not having a memory.

Dewalt doesn't make bad tools, only the best tools for the money.

ilikebikes 12-09-13 10:30 AM

None, eventually the batteries all go bad. I use my dads corded drill, he had it ever since I can remember and its still going like new, no job it cant handle! :thumb: Nothing like a corded drill.

jsharr 12-09-13 10:50 AM

I replaced by old Makita with a Milwaukee. Tried to save money and went with the 12V. Not happy. Under a heavy load protection circuit kicks in and shuts it down. I would go 18V at least. Consumer Reports gave the 18V Rigid R9600 a Best Buy rating. Says it has a great chuck, good speed, etc.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/h...0-99046174.htm

skijor 12-09-13 11:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsharr (Post 16314475)
I replaced by old Makita with a Milwaukee. Tried to save money and went with the 12V. Not happy. Under a heavy load protection circuit kicks in and shuts it down. I would go 18V at least. Consumer Reports gave the 18V Rigid R9600 a Best Buy rating. Says it has a great chuck, good speed, etc.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/h...0-99046174.htm

That's not a great chuck with good speed. This is...
https://global3.memecdn.com/chuck-no...e_o_313879.jpg

ursle 12-09-13 11:51 AM

A few makitas later, a lot of makita flashlight's, went with the dewalt 20v vr, brushless motor, love it.

windhchaser 12-09-13 05:52 PM

i got a rybi 18 volt litjium it came with 2 batts and a cordless skil saw and was only 99 bucks

Michigander 12-09-13 06:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ilikebikes (Post 16314410)
None, eventually the batteries all go bad. I use my dads corded drill, he had it ever since I can remember and its still going like new, no job it cant handle! :thumb: Nothing like a corded drill.

There are a couple problems. First, every one I have ever used keeps spinning after you let off the trigger, which can cause damage for some applications. Second, working with and around the cord can be a real problem, especially for someone in a professional setting.

Simon Cowbell 12-09-13 06:33 PM

I like the newer Bosch 12V drills. Light is right, and these fit my hand perfectly. The 2.0Ah battery is the way to go.

trackhub 12-09-13 06:57 PM

All the maintenance dudes where I work use DeWalt power tools. These guys use their tools heavily every day, never heard
a single complaint.

Milwaukee is well respected, and surely makes a good tool. But, they are more money, as already noted.

Will G 12-09-13 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jsharr (Post 16314475)
I replaced by old Makita with a Milwaukee. Tried to save money and went with the 12V. Not happy. Under a heavy load protection circuit kicks in and shuts it down. I would go 18V at least. Consumer Reports gave the 18V Rigid R9600 a Best Buy rating. Says it has a great chuck, good speed, etc.

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/h...0-99046174.htm

I've got one of those things. Used it to stir mortar and then grout when I put in tile. There is a lot of torque in that drill.

jdon 12-09-13 10:36 PM

I used to build homes as a secondary job. My all time favorite was a Craftsman 19.2 Volt. It was durable, plenty of torque and good battery life. I went from them to DeWalt but had a lot of chuck problems. Have since gone to Milwaukee which I really like but has the shortest battery life. Quick charging though.

UnfilteredDregs 12-09-13 11:45 PM

I've done quite a bit of heavy duty work with my Hilti's, love them.

overthehillmedi 12-10-13 12:06 PM

Nobody has mentioned Festool drills yet so here you go and no I don't own any Festools. http://www.festool.com/EN/Products/P...-4-Li-4-2-Plus

Simon Cowbell 12-10-13 12:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bjtesch (Post 16313549)
Another thing I've thought about- there are a few small drills on the market with 12V batteries. These would be advantageous sometimes around the house even though they won't drive the big stuff like the big drills. So another option is to buy a new 12V drill and get new batteries for my older big drills.

That was my thinking too. Now I hardly use anything but the smaller drills.

bigbenaugust 12-10-13 03:44 PM

I am kind of done with cordless drills. I had a Ryobi many years ago that I used until the batteries crapped out and I currently have a Craftsman where one of the two original batteries is just okay. It gets used as an electric screwdriver, mostly.

bjtesch 12-10-13 08:50 PM

I've been looking into the small 12V drills and it seems that they aren't all that much smaller or lighter than the latest compact DeWalt 20V drill which can be found fairly cheaply now on sale for Christmas. Some of the 12V drills have the battery in the handle which makes the handle more compact, but the head isn't that much more compact. I'm thinking I will go with the 20V DeWalt which makes my other drills redundant. I hate to throw away the 14.4V DeWalt since it is in nice condition and would work well with a good battery. I can buy generic batteries for about $32 each. Buying 2 batteries for $64 hardly makes sense if I can buy the whole new DeWalt drill with charger and 2 new batteries for $100, but I can buy one battery and then find a friend of family member to give the drill to.

And I'm going to send the Rigid batteries back to the factory with a nasty letter and see where that gets me. If I have to I will sell the drill/impact driver/reciprocating saw/flashlight on ebay for a few bucks.

Now my biggest decision is whether to buy the DeWalt drill for $100 or get the drill and the impact driver for $200, which is what I really want to do.

And BTW I do have an old Craftsman corded 3/8" VSR drill that I've used a lot but it still works great. I built a 15'x15' deck and used it for that. My DeWalt wouldn't drive the big deck screws but the corded drill did it easily. But then a few years ago when I fixed my father's fence by adding self tapping screws to loose boards to reattach them to the steel tubing stringers I drove a lot of screws with the DeWalt and one battery.

I've owned several different cordless drills before I got the DeWalt and it turned out to be a very good product. Like I said its batteries lasted over 10 years, hopefully my next drill will last as long.

I wanted to add this little tidbit too- my wife and I just moved, in the garage of our new house I found a Black & Decker 14.4V cordless drill that the previous owner left. I was looking at it and the batteries looked so similar to my DeWalt that I checked and they would fit in the DeWalt drill. I charged one for a few hours and it would power the DeWalt. They fit a little tight in the DeWalt charger but fit just fine in the drill. I didn't do any extensive testing with the drill before I gave it to my daughter.

ilikebikes 12-11-13 04:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Michigander (Post 16315962)
There are a couple problems. First, every one I have ever used keeps spinning after you let off the trigger, which can cause damage for some applications. Second, working with and around the cord can be a real problem, especially for someone in a professional setting.

First, it takes years of practice to be a pro. A pro knows when to lay off the juice of a wired drill at the right time, its a learned skill, just like every thing else a pro knows. Second, a pro knows how to work with and around the cord. Again a skill that only a pro has mastered. Pros were using wired drills before you and I were born. They never had to worry about about dead batteries. ;)

genec 12-11-13 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bjtesch (Post 16319743)
I've been looking into the small 12V drills and it seems that they aren't all that much smaller or lighter than the latest compact DeWalt 20V drill which can be found fairly cheaply now on sale for Christmas. Some of the 12V drills have the battery in the handle which makes the handle more compact, but the head isn't that much more compact. I'm thinking I will go with the 20V DeWalt which makes my other drills redundant. I hate to throw away the 14.4V DeWalt since it is in nice condition and would work well with a good battery. I can buy generic batteries for about $32 each. Buying 2 batteries for $64 hardly makes sense if I can buy the whole new DeWalt drill with charger and 2 new batteries for $100, but I can buy one battery and then find a friend of family member to give the drill to.

And I'm going to send the Rigid batteries back to the factory with a nasty letter and see where that gets me. If I have to I will sell the drill/impact driver/reciprocating saw/flashlight on ebay for a few bucks.

Now my biggest decision is whether to buy the DeWalt drill for $100 or get the drill and the impact driver for $200, which is what I really want to do.

And BTW I do have an old Craftsman corded 3/8" VSR drill that I've used a lot but it still works great. I built a 15'x15' deck and used it for that. My DeWalt wouldn't drive the big deck screws but the corded drill did it easily. But then a few years ago when I fixed my father's fence by adding self tapping screws to loose boards to reattach them to the steel tubing stringers I drove a lot of screws with the DeWalt and one battery.

I've owned several different cordless drills before I got the DeWalt and it turned out to be a very good product. Like I said its batteries lasted over 10 years, hopefully my next drill will last as long.

I wanted to add this little tidbit too- my wife and I just moved, in the garage of our new house I found a Black & Decker 14.4V cordless drill that the previous owner left. I was looking at it and the batteries looked so similar to my DeWalt that I checked and they would fit in the DeWalt drill. I charged one for a few hours and it would power the DeWalt. They fit a little tight in the DeWalt charger but fit just fine in the drill. I didn't do any extensive testing with the drill before I gave it to my daughter.

OK I wasn't going to say anything as your choice of DeWalt strikes me as a good choice of a strong professional tool... as is Milwaukee... however that said... I want to interject one thing... that is the lack of support of proprietary batteries... this drives me nuts. I really see it in the camera market where we own something like 6 Canon cameras... and every damn one of them has a different battery and charger. Now I can understand the need for a difference where the size of the device is dramatically different... such as a Point and Shoot vice DSLR, but we have two DSLRs that are only one model digit apart, and damn if the batteries are not different.

OK to conclude my little rant I want to bring up Ryobi... not exactly of the same grade as DeWalt... but they have done something that warms my heart... all their tools use the One Plus battery design. This is an 18 volt system, so plenty of power when you need it. I have owned a set of Ryobi tools for well over 7 years and while the nicad batteries have slowly died, the new One+ Lithium batteries fit the same old tools and absolutely kick butt.... plus the new charger handles the old batteries. So at least in this regard, Ryobi did not go the planned obsolescence route.

Maybe Dewalt has a similar program... if so, great, they tend to build strong tools. But if not, well then damn, expect to eventually find out you can't get a replacement battery, even though the tool works just fine, or would, if you could get a battery. A quick check at the Dewalt site shows lots of different batteries... so buyer beware.

fietsbob 12-11-13 05:20 PM

Post 4] when dealing with a 1/16" drill bit, I'd take the eggbeater drill out.


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