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Old 12-23-13, 06:13 PM   #1
windhchaser 
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i love tools

i just like to have the ability to fix or build things.bought some for the remodel the guy who worked for me only had one tool so i bought em to keep labor cost down he sure used the hect out of em.but at least i still have them
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Old 12-23-13, 06:21 PM   #2
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My favorite tool is a capitalist.
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Old 12-23-13, 06:23 PM   #3
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Tools are pretty cool. I need an air compressor.
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Old 12-23-13, 06:27 PM   #4
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Tools are pretty cool. I need an air compressor.
almsot bought one it was 50 bucks at home depot the pancake kind it came with many accessories
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Old 12-23-13, 06:37 PM   #5
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My parents were surprised when at age 16, tools like hammers, saws and vise-grips started appearing on my Christmas list. Happily, they humored me and got my tool collection started.
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Old 12-23-13, 06:51 PM   #6
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Tools are pretty cool. I need an air compressor.
Group purchase?
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Old 12-23-13, 08:03 PM   #7
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Lol... I need one too... at least a 30 gallon
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Old 12-23-13, 08:54 PM   #8
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A guy can never have too many tools.

I was buying tools for my hobbies when I was younger then 16. I started working on cars in my dad's shop when I was 15 so I got into serious tools then. Then in college and after I was doing home handyman projects. I've got lots of tools now, my challenge is fixing up my new garage so I have places for them and can find them when I need them.

I love to go through Home Depot or Lowes and look at the tools, and on my occasional trips to Harbor Freight I will just start at one side of the store and go through the whole store looking at everything. But I only buy new tools when I have a need for them.
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Old 12-24-13, 07:07 AM   #9
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Just bought a new air compressor when the old Sears 30 gal. bought the farm. They don't sell parts for them anymore. Don't think I like the new oil-less compressors.
I'm a tool freak too. Have more tools than garage space.
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Old 12-24-13, 07:44 AM   #10
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I enjoy being able to do my own repairs and having the right tool to do the job right is always nice. The air compressor is handy. In the last couple months mine has topped off car tires, attached floor baseboard trim, and stapled new upholstery on chair arm rests.
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Old 12-24-13, 02:38 PM   #11
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Tools I Have Loved.
Hand tools: My Lie-Neilson low-angle block plane. Almost too nice to use!

Power tools: A 1960s vintage Stanley router. Out of 8 routers, by far my fav.

This year's fav: Senco Fusion finish nailer. This thing rocks. It's got me looking into cordless framing nailers.
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Old 12-24-13, 03:58 PM   #12
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Ahh, tools. What is more manly? I've always thought that when women are having baby showers or bridal showers, us dudes should be entitled to have
tool parties. Who's with me?

So, tools I love:

For electronics, Xcelite. Been using them for thirty plus years now. Pricey, yes. But, always the best, and an industry standard. Parents got me this toolkit for my 18th birthday.
I still have it, although I did replace the roll up pouch some years back. Tools still going strong, under near daily use. Price paid for this set in 1975: $35.00. Sorry kids.



For cycling: Park. Just the best, in my own experience. Pedro's also makes some decent cycling tools.

General work, automotive work: Craftsman used to be a fave, but something happened to the quality and they just aren't that good anymore.
Husky, from the Home Depot, looks and feels like a better tool. Klein is also a pretty good tool outfit. Of course, in any discussion about tools,
Snap-On must be mentioned. Very, very expensive, but if you can afford them.. Yeah, might as well go for it.

A brand you don't see much today: Matco tools. They have an Active website but I rarely see their trucks
on the road anymore. They were once a fixture at gas stations and car dealerships in my area, but they seem to have all but vanished. Anyone know
anything?
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Old 12-24-13, 04:21 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by trackhub View Post
Ahh, tools. What is more manly? I've always thought that when women are having baby showers or bridal showers, us dudes should be entitled to have
tool parties. Who's with me?

So, tools I love:

For electronics, Xcelite. Been using them for thirty plus years now. Pricey, yes. But, always the best, and an industry standard. Parents got me this toolkit for my 18th birthday.
I still have it, although I did replace the roll up pouch some years back. Tools still going strong, under near daily use. Price paid for this set in 1975: $35.00. Sorry kids.



For cycling: Park. Just the best, in my own experience. Pedro's also makes some decent cycling tools.

General work, automotive work: Craftsman used to be a fave, but something happened to the quality and they just aren't that good anymore.
Husky, from the Home Depot, looks and feels like a better tool. Klein is also a pretty good tool outfit. Of course, in any discussion about tools,
Snap-On must be mentioned. Very, very expensive, but if you can afford them.. Yeah, might as well go for it.

A brand you don't see much today: Matco tools. They have an Active website but I rarely see their trucks
on the road anymore. They were once a fixture at gas stations and car dealerships in my area, but they seem to have all but vanished. Anyone know
anything?
Matco is still in tucson
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Old 12-24-13, 06:53 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trackhub View Post
Ahh, tools. What is more manly? I've always thought that when women are having baby showers or bridal showers, us dudes should be entitled to have
tool parties. Who's with me?

So, tools I love:

For electronics, Xcelite. Been using them for thirty plus years now. Pricey, yes. But, always the best, and an industry standard. Parents got me this toolkit for my 18th birthday.
I still have it, although I did replace the roll up pouch some years back. Tools still going strong, under near daily use. Price paid for this set in 1975: $35.00. Sorry kids.



For cycling: Park. Just the best, in my own experience. Pedro's also makes some decent cycling tools.

General work, automotive work: Craftsman used to be a fave, but something happened to the quality and they just aren't that good anymore.
Husky, from the Home Depot, looks and feels like a better tool. Klein is also a pretty good tool outfit. Of course, in any discussion about tools,
Snap-On must be mentioned. Very, very expensive, but if you can afford them.. Yeah, might as well go for it.

A brand you don't see much today: Matco tools. They have an Active website but I rarely see their trucks
on the road anymore. They were once a fixture at gas stations and car dealerships in my area, but they seem to have all but vanished. Anyone know
anything?

matco is still with us, as is cornwell. true, i don't see as many around as i used to.
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Old 12-24-13, 07:43 PM   #15
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I'm not handy at all, but some of my family is. We have done a few building projects here and there and we have a family friend who is a contractor. His line is "half of the job is having the right tools." I'm hoping to become more handy once our house is finished. I hear that being a homeowner forces you to do so.
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Old 12-24-13, 08:07 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by windhchaser View Post
almsot bought one it was 50 bucks at home depot the pancake kind it came with many accessories
I have a pancake compressor in the boot right now, taking it to work tomorrow (I'm going to my sister's and our shop is next door).
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Old 12-25-13, 05:57 PM   #17
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How about some more esoteric tools? Like a 1" micrometer? Most machinists I know use the ones from Starrett Tool Co. These are way cool.

Of course, some say that nothing is more fun to use than a 16 pound sledge hammer. These definitely appeal to the Y-Chromosome in all of us, right men?
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Old 12-25-13, 06:27 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trackhub View Post

For electronics, Xcelite. Been using them for thirty plus years now. Pricey, yes. But, always the best, and an industry standard. Parents got me this toolkit for my 18th birthday.
I still have it, although I did replace the roll up pouch some years back. Tools still going strong, under near daily use. Price paid for this set in 1975: $35.00. Sorry kids.


Amazing! I got the same kit right around the same time that you did. I can remember my Dad driving me the 20 miles or so across town. I believe it was Heathkit. I still have most of the original tools with the exception of maybe a stubby nut driver which I finally recently replaced and my diagonal cutters which my little brother broke years ago but were never replaced.

I was recently heart broken. I lost the handle and screwdriver out on our community property while installing a solar lighting system I designed and built. I looked everywhere and could not find it, But wouldn't you know it, one of the landscapers found it and turned it in!

Is that the original case? If so it looks darn good. I finally replaced mine. It got to beaten up. It saw lots of TV and radio repairs in the early years. Two I remember the most.

One I was working on the HV section of a TV. It was late, I was tired and not thinking. Stuck a screw driver under the HV cap to test for HV. I forgot to ground the screwdriver! I then became ground and got zapped with about 30KV. Knocked me on the ground, I couldn't see for a minute or so, pretty scary. These young pups today don't get to experience that joy. With SMD, I doubt anything is really repairable today anyway.

The other incident. It was a bit later in live. Was on a sailing trip and someone stumbled below deck and bumped into the TV and broke the volume control. The owner agreed to allow me to repair it and then return it on our next trip to the bay. Saved us a bundle.


I also agree with your assessment on Craftsman. The quality is poor and I just don't like the feel of the new handles on the socket drives. The old ones are so much better. I still have most of my tools back from when I was a teen (purchased in the mid to late 70s).

A good source for tools is Harbor Freight. Decent quality and cheap prices. Most of the stuff is made in China today anyway so no sense buying from the big box stores and paying the markup. Are tools here are all the Pittsburgh brand tools. I would be curious if in other cities Harbor Freight tags them with that city's name.
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Old 12-25-13, 07:29 PM   #19
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The more money you spend in tools and learn to use them, the more money you save. I didn't own a tool until I was about 20 years old. From the age of 18 to 20, I spent more money on having my car repaired by someone else than I have in tools and car repairs from age 20 through 41.

Of all the budget related boards I've read, it still blows my mind when people complain they don't have the money for this or that, then say how they came into a "budget buster" and need to spend $500 to have the car brakes replaced. Probably the easiest thing to do on a car for less than $100 with nothing more than a few wrenches or allen wrenches on some cars and an hour of time.
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Old 12-25-13, 08:11 PM   #20
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Probably the easiest thing to do on a car for less than $100 with nothing more than a few wrenches or allen wrenches on some cars and an hour of time.
Definitely easy for those with basic experience, but it can't be suggested to readily for someone who doesn't understand how to adequately gutentight the bolts, or otherwise use a torque wrench. Also too, I see a lot of problems with back yard pad slaps in the rust belt, because the hardware and mating surface for the hardware gets rusted out and often people don't clean and lubricate it properly, and the rusty grooved rotors don't get machined or replaced and end up pulsating/making noise/destroying brand new pads, and sometimes screwed up calipers don't even get replaced. Paired with the fact that messing this up can make the wheels fall off or the car not stop, it's not something to do without at least a helping hand from a competent person the first time around.
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Old 12-25-13, 08:28 PM   #21
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Looking back at a life time of tool usage the one tool that has paid for itself in convenience, practicality and getting the job done in a workman-like manner is my Park PCS-1 stand, long discontinued. Just a consumer level stand, kind of clunky but it's held a lot of bikes for me. If I worked on bikes professionally it wouldn't really be suitable but for almost 30 years it's gotten used several times a week.
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Old 12-25-13, 10:35 PM   #22
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Mmmm . . . . tools.

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File Type: jpg Pegboard 12-13.jpg (77.8 KB, 22 views)
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Old 12-25-13, 11:04 PM   #23
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Looking back at a life time of tool usage the one tool that has paid for itself in convenience, practicality and getting the job done in a workman-like manner is my Park PCS-1 stand, long discontinued. Just a consumer level stand, kind of clunky but it's held a lot of bikes for me. If I worked on bikes professionally it wouldn't really be suitable but for almost 30 years it's gotten used several times a week.
Drying laundry doesn't count.
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Old 12-25-13, 11:11 PM   #24
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have the car brakes replaced. Probably the easiest thing to do on a car for less than $100
I worked in my father's garage for awhile and I've done a lot of brakes. Most drum brakes of the time were fairly similar. I was helping a friend do his brakes, this was a guy that was very methodical and meticulous. He would take something apart slowly so he could study how the parts fit together and interacted, then he understood how it worked and that would help him to put it back together. I released the springs that hold the shoes on, took off all of the parts and left them in a little pile under the hub. He almost freaked out, wondering how we could possibly get it put back together. I told him no big deal, I could put it back together blindfolded.

DB brings up a good point in his post- having a lot of tools is great, but organization is also very important. About 5 years ago I got the idea to put pegboard in my garage and it was one of the best things I ever did. Rather than dig through crowded drawers to find something, I could just pluck it off of the pegboard. When we moved a couple of months ago I put up new pegboard in my garage as soon as I was able to.
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Old 12-26-13, 09:33 AM   #25
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I have a Gerber cool tool that's saved my tush on a few occasions. Love to get a titanium version one day...
And I have a Gerber Auto 06 (knife) that is another of my favorite tools. I think I received my first tool box around 12 or 13.
Pegboard is a good idea for organization, I recommend tempered masonite, 1/4" should do. I've seen newer aluminum pegboard panels that would make a nice upgrade.
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