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  1. #26
    Crawlin' up, flyin' down bikingshearer's Avatar
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    Do all the research stuff people have suggested. Keep in mind that there is one, and only one, hard number from which to work - the MSRP on the window sticker. No, I do not mean you should pay that amount, but it is the only consistent number the dealer will let you see, and then only because he/she has to. A dealer's "invoice" is worthless and can be ginned up to say damn near anything. Even if the "invoice" is legit, it often will nto reflect rebates or othe promotional deals the factory gives to the dealer. By contrast, he MSRP must be the same for all cars of the same make, model and equipment. So when calculating how much to pay, start with the MSRP.

    In any negotiation, and especially with car negotiations, you have to be prepared to walk away. If you aren't, you will be had. Figure out your "best offer" price ahead of time, and walk if you can't get the car for that. (Walk away slowly, so as to give the salesperson a chance to chase you down with a "final" offer - I have had salespeople do this with me, although they never hurled shrubs at me ) If you can't get the car for your "best offer" price at several dealerships, you may have to readjust it upwards a bit or aim for a different car - more popular cars can go for more than the sticker price, some go for a bunch less, and it isn't an exact science.

    If you are in a negotiation situation (as opposed to where the credit union finds the car and best price for you), be prepared to actually negotiate. Don't try the "I know you'll sell this car for $X below sticker, so let's just cut to the chase" approach. Psychologically, they have to try to get you to pay more. Start below your "best offer" price and let them work to bring you up to it (or maybe even less than that). It sounds (and feels) kind of dumb, and I can't explain why it's true, but experience says it is true.
    "I'm in shape -- round is a shape." Andy Rooney

  2. #27
    You Know!? For Kids! jsharr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikingshearer View Post
    Do all the research stuff people have suggested. Keep in mind that there is one, and only one, hard number from which to work - the MSRP on the window sticker. No, I do not mean you should pay that amount, but it is the only consistent number the dealer will let you see, and then only because he/she has to. A dealer's "invoice" is worthless and can be ginned up to say damn near anything. Even if the "invoice" is legit, it often will nto reflect rebates or othe promotional deals the factory gives to the dealer. By contrast, he MSRP must be the same for all cars of the same make, model and equipment. So when calculating how much to pay, start with the MSRP.

    In any negotiation, and especially with car negotiations, you have to be prepared to walk away. If you aren't, you will be had. Figure out your "best offer" price ahead of time, and walk if you can't get the car for that. (Walk away slowly, so as to give the salesperson a chance to chase you down with a "final" offer - I have had salespeople do this with me, although they never hurled shrubs at me ) If you can't get the car for your "best offer" price at several dealerships, you may have to readjust it upwards a bit or aim for a different car - more popular cars can go for more than the sticker price, some go for a bunch less, and it isn't an exact science.

    If you are in a negotiation situation (as opposed to where the credit union finds the car and best price for you), be prepared to actually negotiate. Don't try the "I know you'll sell this car for $X below sticker, so let's just cut to the chase" approach. Psychologically, they have to try to get you to pay more. Start below your "best offer" price and let them work to bring you up to it (or maybe even less than that). It sounds (and feels) kind of dumb, and I can't explain why it's true, but experience says it is true.
    I would like to buy your post. How much?
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorider View Post
    Phobias are for irrational fears. Fear of junk ripping badgers is perfectly rational. Those things are nasty.

  3. #28
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pamestique View Post
    do you really need…..back up cameras?
    I really wouldn’t want to go back to not having a back-up camera!

    I bought a new car last year. I did some research and then test drove a number of models to see which one I liked best. Then I worked out the money….what I wanted to pay over dealer invoice, manufacturer incentives/rebates, tax/license fees and financing. When all that was done I called the salesperson who did the test drive with me and told her exactly what I would pay in total. If that worked for them give me a call and I’d drop off a filled in financials/application for a negligible interest rate loan the manufacturer was offering and when the paper work was done I'd come in to finalize the deal. I spent less than a hour finishing the buy at the dealership.

  4. #29
    Sore saddle cyclist Shifty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clemsongirl View Post
    I really wouldn’t want to go back to not having a back-up camera!

    I bought a new car last year. I did some research and then test drove a number of models to see which one I liked best. Then I worked out the money….what I wanted to pay over dealer invoice, manufacturer incentives/rebates, tax/license fees and financing. When all that was done I called the salesperson who did the test drive with me and told her exactly what I would pay in total. If that worked for them give me a call and I’d drop off a filled in financials/application for a negligible interest rate loan the manufacturer was offering and when the paper work was done I'd come in to finalize the deal. I spent less than a hour finishing the buy at the dealership.
    Yeah baby! That's how to do it......bravo!
    Those voices in your head aren't real, but they have some great ideas

  5. #30
    Senior Member Michigander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by late View Post
    now go buy a used car.
    This is among the best advice from the entire thread. I am a mechanic, and I work at a dealer, and I have never in my life that I can recall suggested a person buy a new car, nor do I intend to in the future.

    If you get an older car with a clean/not rusty body, a strong engine and transmission and readily available and cheap parts, you will save a ton of money, money which can be better spent on things you enjoy.

    Perhaps most importantly of all, avoid Chrysler products new and old like the plague.
    Bring back the Sig Test!


    (\__/)
    (='.'=)
    (")_(")

  6. #31
    Senior Member RPK79's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michigander View Post
    This is among the best advice from the entire thread. I am a mechanic, and I work at a dealer, and I have never in my life that I can recall suggested a person buy a new car, nor do I intend to in the future.

    If you get an older car with a clean/not rusty body, a strong engine and transmission and readily available and cheap parts, you will save a ton of money, money which can be better spent on things you enjoy.

    Perhaps most importantly of all, avoid Chrysler products new and old like the plague.
    I bought a 2004 Chrysler 300M about 6 months ago...

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