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  1. #1
    Port Rocket-Sauce's Avatar
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    Gloss to Matte clearcoat?

    My frame is currently nude carbon with a very glossy clearcoat. It is a Calfee Dragonfly, but because of the black-letters-on-carbon decals, and the very-glossy-almost-wet-looking clearcoat, it sort of looks like a generic Chinese frame. I would prefer a matte finish. Is it possible to wet-sand it down to the desired level of gloss or is a total re-finish the only option?

    I have experience wet-sanding boats, so I am not intimidated by the process. I am more curious to hear from someone who has done this on a bicycle frame and has pictures.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Randomhead
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    I think you will succeed in putting a batch of micro-scratches in the finish and it will look worn. My understanding is that a matte finish is achieved using a flattening additive.

  3. #3
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Leave it out side in a desert sandstorm?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    I have successfully "flattened" the gloss on many CF components (forks and cranks) using varying grades of Scotchbrite, and changing the sanding pattern from straight, to perpendicular, to circular. It will be harder to get an even finish on a bike frame with it's nooks and crannies, especially around the bottom bracket area and other tube joints.

    It will require a complete tear-down, and be sure to degrease to remove all wax and mold release agents.

    If you are hell-bent on doing this, I might seek out a local media blaster with a steady hand and the ability to work with soda blasting medium.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by reddog3 View Post
    I have successfully "flattened" the gloss on many CF components (forks and cranks) using varying grades of Scotchbrite, and changing the sanding pattern from straight, to perpendicular, to circular. It will be harder to get an even finish on a bike frame with it's nooks and crannies, especially around the bottom bracket area and other tube joints.

    It will require a complete tear-down, and be sure to degrease to remove all wax and mold release agents.

    If you are hell-bent on doing this, I might seek out a local media blaster with a steady hand and the ability to work with soda blasting medium.
    It's much easier than many seem to assume. and the above gives a good idea of how to get started. The finest abrasive pad from 3M will work fine.
    An abrasive powder helps as well. You can experiment with something like baking soda or even toothpaste.
    Even basic automotive polishing compound produces a slight matte finish.
    Just err on the side of too fine rather than getting actual visible scratches.

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