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  1. #1
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    What is FRX tubing

    Hi,

    I hope you don't mind . I also posted this under the "Bicycle Mechanics" forum.

    I have a Pinarello Gavia (about 8 years old) that has a Sticker saying it is made of FRX tubing.

    The bike frame is lugged.

    I was just wondering if anyone has any information or links on this tubing.

    Is it made by Columbus or some other company?
    Is it a high end tubing or just run of the mill.


    Thanks Ed

  2. #2
    ex frame builder
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    Do you mean Columbus SLX?

    SLX was a tubing set first introduced by Columbus in the mid to late 1980s. (I donít have the exact date.) The inside butted section of the tube, usually about 4 inches, had raised spiral re-enforcing ridges. Like the rifling inside a *** barrel, but raised.

    If you look down the seat tube you will see the spiral ridges at the bottom bracket end, or you can feel them with your finger from inside the bottom bracket shell. A seat tube is always butted at the one end only, as it has to accommodate the seat post at the top end. Top and down tubes are butted both ends. (Hence the term, double butted.) The chainstays of the SLX set also had the spiral ridges inside.

    The SLX tube-set was clamed to be as light as the standard SL tube-set, but stronger. The idea was that the spiral ridges gave the tube a resistance to twisting. Later a TSX tube-set was introduced. The ďTĒ was for Total and the spirals ran the full length inside the top and down tube. Both SLX and TSX were more expensive than the standard SL and at the time were were high end tube-set from Columbus.

    Another piece of general information: Top and down tubes (Reynolds and Columbus.) have a longer butted section at one end. This is the end the framebuilder cuts to accommodate different size frames. The short end, which you donít cut, is marked with the makers trade mark. (Columbus: Dove or Oomegooly Bird as I always called it.)

    Dave Moulton, ex-framebuilder.
    Last edited by Dave Moulton; 01-28-06 at 07:22 AM.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Dave,

    The sticker definately says FRX.
    The Sticker also has the Pinarello brand on it and it says High Tech Tubes with tiny writing saying 18MCDV6RE.

    The back stays and most of the lugs have the word Pinarello or Pinarello the symbol emellished into them.

    The front chromed forks have the Columbus symbol on them.

    Ed

  4. #4
    ex frame builder
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbang
    Thanks Dave,

    The sticker definately says FRX.
    The Sticker also has the Pinarello brand on it and it says High Tech Tubes with tiny writing saying 18MCDV6RE.

    The back stays and most of the lugs have the word Pinarello or Pinarello the symbol emellished into them.

    The front chromed forks have the Columbus symbol on them.

    Ed
    That's interesting. Maybe Pinarello special ordered their own tubing. Does anyone else know?

    Also intersting because FRX was the model name for one of my Fuso frames. FR for Fuso Racing, and X for the extra work that went into the paint and finish. It was a step up from the FR1.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Nessism's Avatar
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    Sounds like a Dedacciai tubeset.

    Cut and paste from Dedacciai:

    DEDACCIAI produces tubes of the highest quality, using the best steel available for the construction of Racing, Competition and MTB frames. We obtain the best results using 18MCDV6 Steel. The chemical composition of this steel prevents the phenomenon of brittleness which can occur during the cooling subsequent to the assembly of the frames. As with all the HSLA (High Strength Low Alloy) steels, with the 18MCDV6, the best mechanical characteristics are achieved, with final tensile strength which can easily reach 1200 N/mm2 after cold-drawing and 1400 N/mm2 with special heat treatment. Another particularly interesting point that further demonstrates the quality of 18MCDV6, it is that not only does it have a very high resistance but it also has great ability to bend before reaching the final breaking point, a characteristic which contributes to the realization of a "structure", that is a frame, which is extremely reliable and safe.
    Becareful buying/selling bike parts on-line. I learned the hard way. :(

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