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  1. #1
    如果你能讀了這個你講中文 genericbikedude's Avatar
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    Slightly over-thick cantilever post

    I just got a new OTP Bob Jackson world tour, and I can barely force a canti brake onto the left canti post on the fork. Once I get it on, it doesn't turn very easily at all -- clearly unworkable.

    My question is whether this is common, and what a shop/framebuilder might be able to do about this, or whether this is something that I should just take some sandpaper to.

    The problem is not the brake, I tried a few old crap cantis that I have lying around, and nothing would fit (or at least not easily).

    So, take it to a framebuilder? Johnny Coast and Brooklyn Machine Works are nearby. Would a reputable shop be able to handle this? Or should I try to sand it down? Any tips on this? What kind of sandpaper, what pitfalls to avoid, etc?

    Thanks for tips!

  2. #2
    Randomhead
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    Quote Originally Posted by genericbikedude View Post
    I just got a new OTP Bob Jackson world tour, and I can barely force a canti brake onto the left canti post on the fork. Once I get it on, it doesn't turn very easily at all -- clearly unworkable.

    My question is whether this is common, and what a shop/framebuilder might be able to do about this, or whether this is something that I should just take some sandpaper to.
    Seems like I just saw a tool to cut the outside diameter of a cantilever braze on today, but
    maybe I'm flaking out in my old age. Is there paint or braze material on the boss?
    Does it look out of round? There is some reason that this is happening, you should
    be able to fix it yourself without too much trouble. But first you have to figure
    out what's causing the problem. A careful inspection will probably reveal the problem

    A framebuilder or decent bike shop should be able to fix it no problem

  3. #3
    如果你能讀了這個你講中文 genericbikedude's Avatar
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    on closer inspection, it does look slightly mushroomed, though its barely perceptible.

    How difficult of a thing is this to fix? if it is mushroomed, this would implications for the length of the post, not just the width, yes?

    how much would a framebuilder charge to replace one of these things do you think?

    (i keep kicking myself that I didn't go for the bilenky!)

  4. #4
    Randomhead
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    Quote Originally Posted by genericbikedude View Post
    on closer inspection, it does look slightly mushroomed, though its barely perceptible.

    How difficult of a thing is this to fix? if it is mushroomed, this would implications for the length of the post, not just the width, yes?

    how much would a framebuilder charge to replace one of these things do you think?

    (i keep kicking myself that I didn't go for the bilenky!)
    I would think that removing the mushroom would leave you with full
    functionality of the brakes. The problem with replacement is
    the paint job. I have a bike that needs a new cantilever post,
    and I figure it will probably take me less than an hour to do the job.
    But the paint job will be ruined. Since you can get the brake on the post,
    a little 100 grit sandpaper should get the brake working properly. Consider
    taking it to the LBS or a framebuilder.

  5. #5
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    UBS sells a tool for this. I had a problem on a Cannondale frame and just fitted a different brake set. I;m sure you could get rid of your problem with some careful file work.

  6. #6
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    Just take a file and carefully remove the mushroom lip, then take a bit of emory cloth to it. That canti stud tool is no good for this problem... much better for putting a clean and straight seat on the bottom of the post. Absoultely not a replacement issue.

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