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  1. #1
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    Do you wear a respirator when brass brazing?

    Brass brazing releases toxic fumes, yet I see many pictures of framebuilders -- both professional and amateur -- brazing without a respirator. So do you wear a respirator when brass brazing? If so, what kind? I've been trying to figure out if my multi-purpose organic vapor cartidges will protect against brazing fumes and smoke. I'm having difficulty finding good information. Thanks

  2. #2
    Randomhead
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    it's not a horrible idea. OTOH, I've had an air quality monitor hooked up while brazing all day, and as far as I know we passed the OSHA requirements. You don't really breathe that much in.

  3. #3
    if it ain't broke, fix it
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    i just hold my breath

    lemme say I do wear a mask when filing or sanding.

  4. #4
    Senior Member PaPa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by northboundtrain View Post
    Brass brazing releases toxic fumes, yet I see many pictures of framebuilders -- both professional and amateur -- brazing without a respirator. So do you wear a respirator when brass brazing? If so, what kind? I've been trying to figure out if my multi-purpose organic vapor cartidges will protect against brazing fumes and smoke. I'm having difficulty finding good information. Thanks
    You should make it a habit of reading the MSDS (material safety data sheets) that accompanies the product you plan on using. Also read the instructions on the back of the flux's container (i.e. black Stay-Silv flux container it states: "Use enough ventilation. exhaust at the flame, or both to keep fumes and gases from the breathing zone and the general area."
    Last edited by PaPa; 01-31-09 at 03:21 PM.

  5. #5
    if it ain't broke, fix it
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    ^^good advice^^ if everyone took that kinda care, we'd be way better off. I do know there are specific cannisters , I'd ask my local welding supply, find a good one and make pals with them.

  6. #6
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    I use a mask for gasses when silver soldering. The flux I use has flouride in it.
    "harder" is not a very good safeword.

  7. #7
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    It depends a lot on the space you have. Weekend warriors often get a nice dose of whatever they are working on due to cramped quarters and low ceilings. I don't do any welding or brazing in the winter since I can't circulate the air half enough. Often the operator's face is a lot closer to the source of fumes, than a monitor. I do a lot of epoxy work, and on cramped surfaces the epoxy pot often gets virtually forced into one's face. I don't doubt the general air quality is fine, but it sucks were I am. I use a belt pack that flushes air over my face. It filters dust only, but the air coming into the pack is much fresher. They make welding hoods with airmates attached, but they are pretty expensive. I would use one if I did this a lot, welder, etc... have some nasty health problems. There are welding specific filter, presumably brazing also.

  8. #8
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    Hey thanks for the responses. I do have a welding respirator that fits under my welding hood, but I think it just filters out smoke and soot, not fumes. I got it at the local welding supply shop, but they didn't seem particularly knowledgeable about what it works for exactly. Tim Paterek suggests using charcoal filter cartridges, but I can't find any source or information on them. Maybe I should go back to the welding supply shop and see if they have any catalogs I could look through.

    My garage has 12' ceilings and a window in the wall opposite the overhead door. I installed a fan in the window that blows air out of the shop. Whenever I weld or braze, I open the overhead door and turn on the fan. Seems to work pretty well.

    I've been wearing my organic vapor cartridge respirator when brazing for what it's worth, and I've never felt any immediate effects. But I figure if I get more into frame building, then I should at least know what the risks are and what precautions are prudent. At this point, all I know is that brazing fumes are bad and to be avoided.

  9. #9
    50000 Guatts of power 127.0.0.1's Avatar
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    painters respirators will block anything you create from brazing


    yes it is a good idea ...all framebuilders I ever met were friggin looney
    I like fat bikes
    and I cannot lie.

  10. #10
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    Hey all yoo CBers:

    northboundtrain Peterpan1 PaPa unterhausen 127.0.0.1 white folks busted knuckles

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