Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    "Bonded" Aluminum Frames

    This is probably old news to many of you, but I recently learned that Lotus apparently glues their frames together, instead of welding:

    http://www.autofieldguide.com/articles/040408.html

    It's supposed to increase strength/save material by not significantly heating up the metal. The article also says gluing spreads out the stress more than welding.

    Have any of you tried this for bike frames? It seems like it would have interesting results.

  2. #2
    Steel80's vinfix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    NJ
    My Bikes
    Zebra, Breezer Venturi, Breezer Lightning Pro
    Posts
    406
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't usually visit this sub-forum, but this caught my attention. Alan frames were "screwed and glued", they were doing that 30 years ago. I had one for 25 years, no problems, though I've heard frames that worked hard might de-bond. Vitus is another one- I ride one now.

  3. #3
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Camp Hill, PA
    My Bikes
    Too many to list here check my signature.
    Posts
    22,383
    Mentioned
    106 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)
    "back in the day" (as they say) almost everyone who made Aluminum frames (at least the ones not rebranding Alans) were as the previous poster says glued and screwed. also most of all the early carbon bike were made this way as well. cannondale was welding but that was partly because of the diameter of the tubes they used were not compatible with luggs available.

    the term 'glued and screwed' did not exactly mean that the tube were "screwed" together but (atleast as I was told) that the tube had a few grooves around it's circumfrence to help retain adhesive while being pressed into the lugg.

    one evening while out on a ride in the early '90s a customer of mine had the seat tube of his Geurcrotti pop out of the BB shell.
    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto, '90 Campione del Fausto Giamondi Specialisma Italiano Mundo, '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '86 Volpe, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

    Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '09 Motobecane SOLD, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

  4. #4
    surly old man jgedwa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    My Bikes
    IRO Mark V, Karate Monkey half fat, Trek 620 IGH, Cannondale 26/24 MTB, Amp Research B3, and more.
    Posts
    3,337
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Some screwed and glued Al frames are actually screwed though. Miyata Elevation MTB's, for example have the tubes glued into lugs and then a bolt through the whole for good measure.

    jim
    Cross Check Nexus7, IRO Mark V, Trek 620 Nexus7, Karate Monkey half fat, IRO Model 19 fixed, Amp Research B3, Surly 1x1 half fat fixed, and more...
    --------------------------
    SB forever

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    5,117
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not that i have anything against epoxy, spent most of the last month bonding stuff in my boat with it. But whatever someone says about a process, you have to check the fine print:

    "Realizing that no mass-production operation can afford the Elise's 50-minute curing time (nor would it wish to incur the expense of multiple ovens), Lotus is replacing the heat-cured single part epoxy adhesive used on the sports car, which required temperatures of 180C, with one that will cure in the lower heat of the paint oven."

    Those are some pretty pathetic limitations to asume in your process. I build stuff in my garage and have a curring oven that heats to 180F (3 x 100 watt lightbulbs), and the cure takes 4 hours. Now at their level they probably don't have a problem curing in their paint oven. But spare me if I don't get all goose pimply over what they are doing. This is a classic pros against joes issue. I would never want to go into the ring with a pro boxer, but often in the crafts there can be an edge for an amateur with a lot of time to waste, though no hope against Lotus. One comon example is when pros can't source materials at the scale of their production, while a Joe can get just about anything on a small scale.

  6. #6
    cs1
    cs1 is offline
    Senior Member cs1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Clev Oh
    My Bikes
    Specialized, Schwinn
    Posts
    6,518
    Mentioned
    7 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Peterpan1 View Post
    Not that i have anything against epoxy, spent most of the last month bonding stuff in my boat with it. But whatever someone says about a process, you have to check the fine print:

    "Realizing that no mass-production operation can afford the Elise's 50-minute curing time (nor would it wish to incur the expense of multiple ovens), Lotus is replacing the heat-cured single part epoxy adhesive used on the sports car, which required temperatures of 180C, with one that will cure in the lower heat of the paint oven."

    Those are some pretty pathetic limitations to asume in your process. I build stuff in my garage and have a curring oven that heats to 180F (3 x 100 watt lightbulbs), and the cure takes 4 hours. Now at their level they probably don't have a problem curing in their paint oven. But spare me if I don't get all goose pimply over what they are doing. This is a classic pros against joes issue. I would never want to go into the ring with a pro boxer, but often in the crafts there can be an edge for an amateur with a lot of time to waste, though no hope against Lotus. One comon example is when pros can't source materials at the scale of their production, while a Joe can get just about anything on a small scale.
    Once the glue cures can it be reheated? I ask because I wanted to powder coat an old Raleigh Technium frame. I'm a little leary of the 375 deg heat though. So, I passed on doing it.
    1999 Waterford RSE-11, 1995 Waterford 1200, 1989 Specialized Rockhopper Comp
    1989 Raleigh Technium, 1989 Schwinn Traveler, 1986 Specialized Rockhopper
    1984 Specialized Stumpjumper, 1986 Specialized Stumpjumper and just way too many projects to list.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •