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Old 01-23-12, 10:40 AM   #1
shock_troops
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Repaired Dropout on Miyata 1000

I'm planning an ~2 month tour for the spring, and I'm trying to figure out which bike I would like to make tour-ready. My first choice would be this Miyata 1000 frame that I have. However, it has been repaired (by a pro) on the drive-side rear dropout, and I'm unsure if that could be an issue while on tour. The last thing I would want is for the dropout to snap, particularly on a large descent or something. How risky does this look to you folks?
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Old 01-23-12, 10:55 AM   #2
pdlamb
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If 'twere me, I wouldn't worry about it. Much.

First, you said a pro did the work. He should know what he's doing.

Second, a good weld is stronger than the base metal.

Third, ride it a fair bit this spring during your training to make sure there's no major problem waiting to jump out when you get on the road.

Finally, you should be able to slow down with your front brake. The worst that can happen is you'll be stranded. Most likely, if that does happen, you can make it to civilization with a clunk on every pedal revolution, or hitch a ride.
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Old 01-23-12, 01:45 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by shock_troops View Post
I'm planning an ~2 month tour for the spring, and I'm trying to figure out which bike I would like to make tour-ready. My first choice would be this Miyata 1000 frame that I have. However, it has been repaired (by a pro) on the drive-side rear dropout, and I'm unsure if that could be an issue while on tour. The last thing I would want is for the dropout to snap, particularly on a large descent or something. How risky does this look to you folks?
Looking at your third picture, you can still see the crack. This would make the repair suspect in my opinion. You have to ask yourself if you want to spend your precious vacation time riding on tour or searching for a repair shop. If it were me, I'd spring for a new touring bike, or at least a new frame, before I set out.

At the very least, ride the bike around for quite a while with a load similar to what you expect to carry on tour. Rice works well for training and testing weight.
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Old 01-23-12, 03:08 PM   #4
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Looking at your third picture, you can still see the crack.
+1. It doesn't look like pro level work to me.
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Old 01-23-12, 03:22 PM   #5
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+1. It doesn't look like pro level work to me.
+1

A proper repair would replace the entire dropout.

You need something like this, properly aligned and brazed into the CS & SS, then painted. An experienced framebuilder would do this repair for less than the cost of a new frame.

http://aebike.com/product/dropouts-r...s2255-qc30.htm

Go here for more advice, repost your OP there:

http://www.bikeforums.net/forumdispl...-Framebuilders

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Old 01-23-12, 03:28 PM   #6
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So they did not have a new drop out to install,?
It was not that much more effort to put in a replacement,
Pro running a welding shop would not order a bike part,
frame repair, at a frame builder, would.

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Old 01-23-12, 04:46 PM   #7
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I don't think I would repair a dropout failure like that with brass. I wouldn't see any problems with a TIG repair, but it would be hard to properly remove that brass, although I am not a TIG expert.

I can't really recommend using that for a tour. I would think that you can still find those dropouts, in fact I may have one.

Last edited by unterhausen; 01-23-12 at 04:53 PM.
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Old 01-23-12, 06:43 PM   #8
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It would seem the general assessment is consistent with how I was feeling about it. I guess the real question is, is this frame worth tracking down a dropout and having it brazed in place by a framebuilder? I realize Miyata 100's are pretty desireable, but considering the cost of the replacement, losing the original paint job, and the fact that it's also missing the fork, it starts to reduce that value further and further.
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Old 01-23-12, 08:11 PM   #9
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Even as someone that can do my own frame repairs, I don't usually find major repairs to be cost effective. For me, it would have to be a very special frame to make it worth my while. In this case, I have a hard time believing that it would be worth doing; you probably could buy a like-new specimen for the same price.
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Old 01-24-12, 07:31 PM   #10
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I'd say it looks like the dropout wasn't heated to a high enough temperature... I would trust a properly done bronze repair but as cyccommute pointed out the original crack is still visible which leads me to think that the filler metal wasn't molten enough to flow into the crack. I would use a large welding tip or a small rosebud to do this kind of repair on a thicker piece of metal... I mostly braze copper and brass for my work but brazing principles are still similar for steel.
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Old 01-25-12, 06:45 AM   #11
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It would be really hard to get that crack clean enough to flow bronze through it. Even then, I don't think I would trust it on a tour.
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Old 01-25-12, 11:01 AM   #12
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It would be really hard to get that crack clean enough to flow bronze through it. Even then, I don't think I would trust it on a tour.
Yeah. I'm not a big fan of repairing cracked dropouts; I'd rather replace the whole thing.

If I were to repair a dropout, I'd first file out the entire crack to make sure there's a clean surface before brazing or welding it. It doesn't look like this was done in this dropout repair.
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Old 01-25-12, 07:36 PM   #13
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Yeah I'd replace rather than repair... could only see myself really riding a repaired dropout while I was already on a tour and had to do the repair myself. I see vintage suntour dropouts on ebay sometime, and on bikestash too they had something similar to the ones on the frame in question in the OP.
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