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  1. #1
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    Adding steel decorations to frame by brazing

    Hello,

    Could anybody please help me solving this problem, any help is much appreciated...

    I am planning to make decorations, that are something like this:

    http://www.columbinecycle.com/images...ter_detail.jpg

    My question is how are they attached? Are they attached in the same method like the lugs?
    How would it be possible to attach the piece that i'd want to braze to the frame prior to brazing so it wouldn't move?

    I don't have brazing equipment, since I will be doing only these decorations to the project, but would it be possble to buy somekind of cheaper torch system and then attach with that the steel decorations?
    And what would be the best filling material for this kind of thing?

    thanks a lot in advance to anybody who can help

    Cheers
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
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    If you aren`t going to be heating the area after attaching them epoxy is possible. On a bike, I would prefer to braze as I think epoxy can work loose over time, sorta like paint does. One option for brazing is silver foil. You don't have to use enough heat to draw the solder in since it is applied under the part for starters. Another option might be soft solder of some kind, since this is purely decorative. Low silver solder, or even plumbing type solder, whatever that is these days. There are liquid versions of that, that one could possibly use like the foil. The foil is very strong, and is used to attach sights and quarter ribs to guns.

    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...r-prod584.aspx

    Normally one does not need much to hold parts on. In the case of something like foil since it will not move around and get all over everything, it might be possible to simply tie the part with wire. Another method is to put something next to the tube that is at the same height as tube, and weldment, then take something heavy like a piece of steel and place it as a bride over the two pieces, so that it weight the weldment down. In this case that might be difficult without fabbing something special since the parts are so small. I have never tried it, but in the absence of a budget for .005" foil, it might be possible to tin the main part in silver solder, and then place a fluxed weldment over that and melt it into the tinning, or you can wet it with solder and drop it in place.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by MassiveD View Post
    If you aren`t going to be heating the area after attaching them epoxy is possible. On a bike, I would prefer to braze as I think epoxy can work loose over time, sorta like paint does. One option for brazing is silver foil. You don't have to use enough heat to draw the solder in since it is applied under the part for starters. Another option might be soft solder of some kind, since this is purely decorative. Low silver solder, or even plumbing type solder, whatever that is these days. There are liquid versions of that, that one could possibly use like the foil. The foil is very strong, and is used to attach sights and quarter ribs to guns.

    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...r-prod584.aspx

    Normally one does not need much to hold parts on. In the case of something like foil since it will not move around and get all over everything, it might be possible to simply tie the part with wire. Another method is to put something next to the tube that is at the same height as tube, and weldment, then take something heavy like a piece of steel and place it as a bride over the two pieces, so that it weight the weldment down. In this case that might be difficult without fabbing something special since the parts are so small. I have never tried it, but in the absence of a budget for .005" foil, it might be possible to tin the main part in silver solder, and then place a fluxed weldment over that and melt it into the tinning, or you can wet it with solder and drop it in place.

    Sorry for being such a newbie, but is this what i should give a shot on a practice part:

    Place some silver foil in between the decoration and the tubing and attach them by perhaps steel wire and then torch it until it melts and then clean edges with file or sandpaper?
    will the edges be like in lugs if properly done, nice and clean?
    Is there a special foil for welding or does any silver foil do the job?


    thanks a lot for the advice, greatly appreciated..

  4. #4
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    exactly what are you attaching?

  5. #5
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    In many cases the part will just sit there without wire. The foil is the thickness of paper, so you can cut it to shape so the "shorelines" should turn out.

    You could also probably use a free hand and a pen like piece of metal to hold the part in contact, since with the method you do not need to hold a rod of solder in the weak hand.

    Other than what you mention the one thing missing is flux. You would need to flux the tube, and the underside of the part. So there is flux between everything in the sandwich. The correct flame is liquid, not noisy, so the part should not get blown away by the flame. Small parts should be no problem with a propane torch. I use Safety silv flux, there are probably better ones, but it works for me.

    With tining, what you do is flux the tube, then melt a bit of hard silver solder on it, then let cool, polish or file the flux thin, then flux the solder, and flux the part, and place together, and heat till fused. You can get deal on 56% solder, cad free, on ebay.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MassiveD View Post
    In many cases the part will just sit there without wire. The foil is the thickness of paper, so you can cut it to shape so the "shorelines" should turn out.

    You could also probably use a free hand and a pen like piece of metal to hold the part in contact, since with the method you do not need to hold a rod of solder in the weak hand.

    Other than what you mention the one thing missing is flux. You would need to flux the tube, and the underside of the part. So there is flux between everything in the sandwich. The correct flame is liquid, not noisy, so the part should not get blown away by the flame. Small parts should be no problem with a propane torch. I use Safety silv flux, there are probably better ones, but it works for me.

    With tining, what you do is flux the tube, then melt a bit of hard silver solder on it, then let cool, polish or file the flux thin, then flux the solder, and flux the part, and place together, and heat till fused. You can get deal on 56% solder, cad free, on ebay.
    great, many thanks now i get it...

  7. #7
    Senior Member GrayJay's Avatar
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    Just get one of these, ask for the bike framebuilder model;

    00296300-311359_catl_500.jpg

  8. #8
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    you would hold them on the same way framebuilders hold on braze-ons. There are many tricks to do that, in this case I might bend a piece of wire. The columbine decorations are obviously brazed on using silver.

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