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Old 04-18-05, 01:06 PM   #1
lin
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Durability and usefulness of quick release

I am looking at new bikes, and one I really like has quick release front and rear wheels as well as seatpost. I love the idea, but I was wondering if there was a major downside, durability wise, or even functionally.

I'm looking at Hybrids and Comfort bikes, It is amazing how nice the bikes around $500 are.

Many come with seatpost suspension too , how well does that work long term?

I do have a bike repair kit, and I promise to learn to use it for simple adjustments and roadside repairs.
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Old 04-18-05, 01:18 PM   #2
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The biggest downside is you have to secure those things when you park the bike. I've had skewers stolen, which is really a drag (especially since I rode off without noticing and crashed shortly thereafter when I tried to jump a curb).

I just bought a set of skewers and seatpost clamp that fasten with an allen bolt. I figure if I'm carrying a pump, tube and tire irons I can carry an allen wrench, and if I'm not it doesn't matter if I can get the wheel off without tools.

Some riders adjust their seat height frequently, but I don't.
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Old 04-18-05, 01:19 PM   #3
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Suspension seatposts are a waste of yar monay. If you're going to be using said bike for commuting and locking the bike outside for periods of time, forget quick release wheels.
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Old 04-18-05, 01:40 PM   #4
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Thanks for the input. I suspected they might be a bit less useful than it looked at first glance, though I see people take their front wheel with them sometimes, if they are locking their bike up for a while.
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Old 04-18-05, 02:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lin
Thanks for the input. I suspected they might be a bit less useful than it looked at first glance, though I see people take their front wheel with them sometimes, if they are locking their bike up for a while.
On the other hand, when you get a flat - and you will- try getting the wheel off You will have to carry a wrench big enough to both loosen and tighten the wheel nuts which means at least a 6 in. Cresent wrench. That's a lot of weight to be lugging around all the time.

Quick release wheels have been around for ages, they are convenient and make changing flats and fixing wheels much easier than the alternative. Just learn how to use them. Ask the shop where you buy the bike how to use them properly.
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Old 04-18-05, 04:40 PM   #6
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I think Quick Release are both safer and more convenient. You don't have to worry about tightening up your bolts and when you are out you don't have to worry about removing the bolts to fix a flat.
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Old 04-18-05, 05:14 PM   #7
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Interesting article on QR skewers by Bike Guru Sheldon Brown. Super reliable and useful for your wheels, but why in the world would you need one for your seatpost?

Are there cyclists who're yanking their saddles up and down for every ride? This one has baffled me for a while.
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Old 04-18-05, 05:27 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute
On the other hand, when you get a flat - and you will- try getting the wheel off You will have to carry a wrench big enough to both loosen and tighten the wheel nuts which means at least a 6 in. Cresent wrench. That's a lot of weight to be lugging around all the time.

I use these skewers (http://www.nashbar.com/profile_morei...ku=8197&brand=) which use a 5mm allen key to loosen. If you're carrying a pump, tube, and tire irons, an allen key is pretty nominal. It's also useful on a lot of bolts on a typical bike.

One other consideration is that it's almost impossible nowadays to get quality wheels that don't use skewers.
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Old 04-18-05, 06:08 PM   #9
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I'm using 26 year old quick releases on my commuter. Reliability is not an issue.

Solid axles are little deterrent to theft. All it takes is a simple wrench to remove a solid axle wheel. If you want to keep your wheels, you should lock your wheels.
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Old 04-18-05, 06:13 PM   #10
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i love having QR. ITs so very easy to take out wheels to change tires or adjust seat height. Unless for a beater, i would not have anything else
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Old 04-18-05, 06:46 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caloso
Interesting article on QR skewers by Bike Guru Sheldon Brown. Super reliable and useful for your wheels, but why in the world would you need one for your seatpost?

Are there cyclists who're yanking their saddles up and down for every ride? This one has baffled me for a while.
I have a QR on the seatpost on one of my bikes that I use for commuting because in NYC they'll take anything and when you have a slightly decent looking seat they'll take that. I also use QR on my wheels so i can take the front off and lock it up with the back and frame so I don't have to walk home one day with a front wheel missing. I've known guys that's had seat, handlebars, and wheels taken. If it comes off, it will get stolen at some point.
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Old 04-18-05, 06:56 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caloso
Are there cyclists who're yanking their saddles up and down for every ride? This one has baffled me for a while.
I don't have one for my RB but I do have one for my MTB. I normally have my seatpost set up for XC work on my MTB and this gets me by on most terrain. However, if I encounter really technical stuff, I'll drop the seatpost to give me more room to move the bike around.
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Old 04-18-05, 07:16 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DCCommuter
I use these skewers (http://www.nashbar.com/profile_morei...ku=8197&brand=) which use a 5mm allen key to loosen. If you're carrying a pump, tube, and tire irons, an allen key is pretty nominal. It's also useful on a lot of bolts on a typical bike.

One other consideration is that it's almost impossible nowadays to get quality wheels that don't use skewers.
I have similar skewers made by ControlTech(Only titanium parts I have and nobody sees them). It gives me minimal feel of security, otherwise I won't leave my bike out of my sight for more than 2 seconds. It takes no more time to remove wheel than with quick release, other than time to take the allen wrench out of the seat bag.
I would use quick release skewers if I'm in a race and the spare wheels are waiting on the roof top of a van behind me. For every day use, it makes no sense.
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Old 04-18-05, 07:25 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lin
I am looking at new bikes, and one I really like has quick release front and rear wheels as well as seatpost. I love the idea, but I was wondering if there was a major downside, durability wise, or even functionally.

I'm looking at Hybrids and Comfort bikes, It is amazing how nice the bikes around $500 are.

Many come with seatpost suspension too , how well does that work long term?

I do have a bike repair kit, and I promise to learn to use it for simple adjustments and roadside repairs.
Quick release is fine, I have no problems with those. However, I have a seatpost suspension on my commuter, and I really dislike it. I bounce way too much, and it's difficult to set the saddle to the correct height (as soon as some weight is placed on the saddle, the suspension give in). I'm planning on replacing it at some point.
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Old 04-18-05, 07:33 PM   #15
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QRs are reliable and very useful. Keeps you from having to carry a 15mm wrench with you. (Aviod cresent wrenches whenever possible) Theft is an issue, and those newer Allen head QRs are a good option.
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Old 04-18-05, 07:45 PM   #16
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the real solution is, if your going to a place where theft is possible, use a beater. The only reason i bring my bike to school now is because I have worked things out with a teacher
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Old 04-18-05, 09:56 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samundsen
Quick release is fine, I have no problems with those. However, I have a seatpost suspension on my commuter, and I really dislike it. I bounce way too much, and it's difficult to set the saddle to the correct height (as soon as some weight is placed on the saddle, the suspension give in). I'm planning on replacing it at some point.
Does your seatpost have an adjustable preload? I had one on a Specialized Expedition, and it had an allen head adjuster that you could get to from the bottm to make it more solid.
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Old 04-18-05, 10:08 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DieselDan
QRs are reliable and very useful. Keeps you from having to carry a 15mm wrench with you. (Aviod cresent wrenches whenever possible) Theft is an issue, and those newer Allen head QRs are a good option.
I guess my ControlTech skewers should be called quick release too then. Thanks for clarifying, DieselDan.
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Old 04-18-05, 10:32 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allgoo19
I have similar skewers made by ControlTech(Only titanium parts I have and nobody sees them). It gives me minimal feel of security, otherwise I won't leave my bike out of my sight for more than 2 seconds. It takes no more time to remove wheel than with quick release, other than time to take the allen wrench out of the seat bag.
I would use quick release skewers if I'm in a race and the spare wheels are waiting on the roof top of a van behind me. For every day use, it makes no sense.
You and DCCommuter must not live in the land of the goat head (http://www.noble.org/imagegallery/Fo.../GoatHead.html). If you had to take the wheel off several times a day , you'd find quick releases to be a necessity!

Honestly, I've been riding bikes for nearly 30 years and never found anyone messing with the quick release. Not even a seat quick release.
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Old 04-18-05, 10:43 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twahl
Does your seatpost have an adjustable preload? I had one on a Specialized Expedition, and it had an allen head adjuster that you could get to from the bottm to make it more solid.
It's adjustable, but as far as I know, not with an allen head, it's just a plastic adjuster that surrounds the seatpost. I have tightened it as far as it can go. My bike is a Specialized Expedition Elite 2002.
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Old 04-19-05, 03:32 AM   #21
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It depends if the bike is for work or leisure.
If you leave your bike unattended all day in a high-risk area, sooner or later someone will mess with your QRs or even remove them. I have used solid axles with a big track nut for security, but a secure locking (not just allen key) QR is better.
carrying the wrench is a nuisance but I carry a pump and repair kit the whole time anyway. I prefer a ring to a cresent wrench; you can apply some foot force to the nut.

Seatpost QR?? waste of space. Use a cheap post/saddle with a nut and no-one will steal it.
Sus post: too much stuff. They weigh more and wear out after heavy use.

I see people locking their fancy bikes up, removing the front wheel to lock to the rear, then removing all the lights/computer etc, then the seatpost and saddle. How far can you ride the time it takes to lock/unlock the bike? I'm sure the overall journey would be faster with a low-tech beater bike where you can safely leave all the bits on the bike.

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Old 04-19-05, 08:21 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samundsen
It's adjustable, but as far as I know, not with an allen head, it's just a plastic adjuster that surrounds the seatpost. I have tightened it as far as it can go. My bike is a Specialized Expedition Elite 2002.
Pull the seatpost out of the frame-you will find an allen head recess at its base (if memory serves, it's a 6 mm). Tightening that will increase the preload on the spring in the seatpost.
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Old 04-19-05, 09:30 AM   #23
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Even if you lock both QR wheels with you, the skeweres are liable to be stolen. No one is going to steal nuts.
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Old 04-19-05, 09:57 AM   #24
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Thanks for the replies, wangster and khuon. I've always wondered, especially since I've spent so much time getting my seat position dialed in.
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Old 04-19-05, 09:54 PM   #25
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I've not had any problems with bike theft (knock on wood!).

However, there is the occasional...jerk...who will play with the shifters...or loosen a QR...or let air out of the tires (Presta valves are an advantage here--few people know how to use them! But Schraders....well...!).

Even...especially when..the bike is parked at work. Indoors!!

I think I know who the culprit..or culprits, are though!

But, I never catch the ...(censored!), and cannot PROVE it! If I ever do catch the idiots, though....! POW!!!
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