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  1. #1
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    Hybrid to single speed

    Hi. I want to convert my hybrid to a single speed bike as I'm going mental while adjusting the gears, and the recent chain skipping sold me the idea to go simple and move on with my life

    I really don't want to spend another penny on my bike as I've already have spent a lot, and it's just not worth it any longer.

    My idea was to keep the cassette and the chainrings as they are, use the 48/18 gear ratio, and shorten the chain.

    Now the problem I see is that I don't know how to tension the chain since the frame has a vertical dropout.................

    In the long run is buying a single speed bike a better idea?

  2. #2
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsisidore View Post
    I really don't want to spend another penny on my bike as I've already have spent a lot, and it's just not worth it any longer. My idea was to keep the cassette and the chainrings as they are, use the 48/18 gear ratio, and shorten the chain. Now the problem I see is that I don't know how to tension the chain since the frame has a vertical dropout.
    The absolute simplest, least expensive means of accomplishing this goal is to set your derailleurs to run that 48/18 gear and just don't shift gears anymore.

  3. #3
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    Great reply, I was thinking about it myself, but how will I fight the urge to shift gears?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Rip the shifters off your bike.

  5. #5
    Senior Member wolfchild's Avatar
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    The simplest way to do it is to: Remove your shifters and derailleurs and throw them away in the garbage and forget that such evil things even exist...Next you will need to shorten your chain and buy a cheap chain tensioner to take up the slack in your chain...Do a google search on chain tensioners, there are few different types and they don't cost a lot.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cross Creek's Avatar
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    You can turn your hybrid into a SS, but there are a couple of flies in the ointment... Your chain may not want to stay on the 48 ring (especially over bumps) because it may not be lined up perfectly with the 18 cog, so you may need a chain keeper. The good ones (like the one from Paul Components) cost about as much as a good front derailleur, so leaving the derailleur in place and setting the limit screws to keep it over the 48 ring is the only way to avoid that expense if you take the shifters off. Also, there aren't any cheap chain tensioners I'm aware of, at least not ones that have enough lateral adjustment to line up with a cog in the middle of a cassette. Once again, the cheap way is to leave the rear derailleur in place and set the limits to keep it line up with the 18 cog. Personally, I'd simply leave the shifters in place and the limits where they are and just not shift. Lastly, riding a derailleur bike in one gear combination will not be as efficient or as powerful as a true SS bike. The SS bike will have thicker, stiffer cog, chainring, and chain, and the chain won't be running through spring-tensioned jockey wheels, giving you a much more direct-drive feel. Test ride a few after you've ridden your bike in one combination for a while and you'll see what I mean.

    If you find that you like riding the 48/18 combination for a while, it may be best to sell that bike as is and buy a "real" SS bike. You'll be more satisfied with it in the end.
    Cross Creek

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