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  1. #1
    Mettle to the Pedals Dewbert's Avatar
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    Sore feet solved with clips?

    Hi folks--As I increase my distance (50 mile on Sat and 40 miles today) I'm starting to get a little sore on the outside of my feet just behind the little toe. I'm riding a hybrid with "regular ole peddals" and wearing tennis shoes. Is it likely that my shoe/pedal situation is causing this?

    I'm not in the position to spend $$ on a clipless shoe set up, but wondered if maybe a set of clips would help. If so, can anyone make a recommendation?

    Thanks in advance.
    Dewbert
    2008 Giant FCR3 (kitted up for touring)
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    http://www.HowILost100Pounds.com

  2. #2
    crotchety young dude el twe's Avatar
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    I don't know if this'll fix it, but either way, I highly recommend some clips and straps for you. They take a little getting used to (less than a week, easily), but after that, you'll be hooked!
    Quote Originally Posted by CardiacKid View Post
    I explained that he could never pay me enough cash for the amount of work I had put into that bike and the only way to compensate me for it was to ride the hell out of it.
    IRO Angus Casati Gold Line

  3. #3
    Fat Guy in Bike Shorts! manual_overide's Avatar
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    i don't know about that. I have toe clips and ride in my tennis shoes. after 20 miles or so, my feet really hurt. I think its because my toe clips are too short and put my feet in the wrong position on the pedals. I'm almost certain clipless pedals will fix this problem.

    What is your budget for new clips/straps? you may be able to find something clipless online that is in your budget. Nashbar has pedals and shoes for about $60 total. They aren't top of the line, but anything is better than platforms and tennis shoes.

  4. #4
    Toyota Racing Dev. PWRDbyTRD's Avatar
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    I swear it is true, once you go clipless you'll never go back. I think a stiffer sole might offer better support. I don't know if they will cure the problem though.
    Linkage...My 2004 Kona Hoss Dee-Lux My Mindless Banter
    Disclaimer: I'm 425lb...I put unnormal loads on my bike. This should help you in answering any of my questions.

  5. #5
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    That area of the foot is a problem area, it's really common for people to get bunions there. It's a bit of a problem area for me. Try some different shoes, wider maybe. Some socks have a seam that ends up right there, very annoying!

    And yeah, I've heard great things about clipless, I want to try that in the future myself.

  6. #6
    Newbie
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    At your miles, I would say go for theclipless pedals and bike shoes. If you are uncomfortable with roadbike shoes--which are hard to walk in--many mountain bike shoes allow use of road bike cleats/pedals, but still give enough lugs to walk easily in and out of stores etc. Costwise, just moticed that in Nashbar catalog thery have their brand of pedals for $34 and there are a lot of shoe deals about the same price. You could be in bike soes and cliipless--more efficient--easier on feet--for $100.

    Go for it.

  7. #7
    genec genec's Avatar
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    Clipless and good stiff bike shoes will go a long way to both making your feet feel better and adding tremendously to your biking efficiency... You will be amazed after you get used to riding with them.

  8. #8
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    What kind of pedals do you have . I used to have some traditional platform road pedals with a raised notch on the outer edge. I had to file it down to prevent soreness and now my platform pedals are of the flat , double sided design.
    Clips are a cheap easy way to get a bit more efficiency. Do ensure you get the correct size clip for your feet. A small cage will not position your feet correctly, as "manual-override" found out. The solution is a cage the correct size.
    Dont cinch the straps tight. This can be dangerous and uncomfortable.

  9. #9
    Mettle to the Pedals Dewbert's Avatar
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    They're just plain old platforms with little knobbies on them.
    2008 Giant FCR3 (kitted up for touring)
    2006 Giant OCRc2 full-Carbon (for the sheer pleasure of riding)
    2005 Fuji MTB (for the snowy and muddy days)
    2007 Schwinn 7 Speed Alloy Cruiser (For getting to the Dairy Queen in style!)

    http://www.HowILost100Pounds.com

  10. #10
    Fred Zen Kabloink's Avatar
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    If you are going to use regular tennis shoes with the clips, I would recommend getting MTB clips. They are taller and allow more flexability with the shoes. Do make sure you get the right size. I have size 11 feet and nothing smaller than a large mtb clip or x-large road clip would work for me.

    When I first started using clips, I found than my calf muscles would get reall sore. I was use to placing the middle of my feet over the pedal instead the ball of my feet. The clips or clipless force you to use the balls of your feet which is the correct position, but it does place a little more stress on the calves as I found out.

  11. #11
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    I also enjoy riding with "regular" shoes and "regular" pedals. But, many tennis shoes have soles that are too thin for long rides. A store near me often has "skateboard" shoes on close-out cheap. They look like regular walking shoes, but have a thicker, stiffer sole. I also like light-weight hiking shoes, for the thicker soles.

    Recently, I have begun replacing the 1985ish "regular" pedals on my bikes with new BMX pedals. The 1985 pedals have support surfaces that are just 1/16th of an inch wide. They can cut into the sole of the shoe, which holds your foot in place. But, that thin "knife's edge" can be felt on a long ride.

    My favorite pedals are some BMX pedals I found last month for about $10. The support surfaces are from 3/8th inch wide to 1/2 inch wide, and covered with rubber padding. Rubber "teeth" to grip the shoes. They grip tightly on the "slick" soles of the dress shoes I wear when riding to work, even when the soles are wet. They are wider than my widest boots, providing a huge 3 1/2 inch by 3 1/2 support platform, compared with the "half dollar" size support platform on some racing pedals.

    A last advantage of BMX pedals: I can shift my feet forward or back 1/2 inch from time to time. That small change in position keeps my feet from getting tired, and a "fresh" angle seems to keep my knees and legs feeling good on a long ride. My half century old knees feel better after a twenty mile ride than they do when I wake up in the morning.

    After "clip-in" pedals became popular with Pros, the number of Pro riders missing major races because of knee surgery went up. The newer designs with increased "float" may decrease the number of knee injuries, but...

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