Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

General Cycling Discussion Have a cycling related question or comment that doesn't fit in one of the other specialty forums? Drop on in and post in here! When possible, please select the forum above that most fits your post!

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-03-16, 08:39 AM   #1
edawg55
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Columbus, Ohio Go Buckeyes!
Bikes: Raleigh Merit 3
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Road Bike Suggestions

I just joined the site. Sorry another noob here...I started cycling this summer. I have a cheap bike now. I don't want to put any money into it. I'm looking to buy a road bike max of $600. I don't feel comfortable buying a used bike. I'm a big guy 5"11 250lbs. I've found some deals on Amazon but would rather buy locally so I can ride it first. Here are some of the bikes I'm looking at in not particular order. Any suggestions would be appricated.


I road this and like it a lot. I got the body scan and 58cm is what I should get.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/contend-3

I can get a discount on this 2016 Trek 1.1. They have a 58cm and 60cm. I can get a better discount on the 60cm if that would work for me.
1.1 | Trek Bikes


Fuji Sportif 2.5 Road Bike - 2016
edawg55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-16, 09:49 PM   #2
VegasTriker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Sin City, Nevada
Bikes: Catrike 700, Greenspeed GTO trike, , Linear LWB recumbent, Haluzak Horizon SWB recumbent, Balance 450 MTB, Cannondale SM800 Beast of the East
Posts: 1,581
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 129 Post(s)
Look at the component list for each. Both the Giant and Trek use Shimano Claris which is the next to lowest on the road bike list. https://www.evanscycles.com/coffeest...heir-hierarchy The Fuji uses Shimano A070 (Tourney) which is at the bottom of the Shimano list, Evans Cycle doesn't even list it but that's where it belongs. The general opinion I see is that all of them will work OK. I personally prefer midrange components like Deore and 105 but that's because I can afford them and I look for components that work well for a lot of miles. If you are on a budget, then entry level is what you get.

The only company with the cohones to list a weight is Trek for the 56 cm 22" frame 24 lbs.
VegasTriker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-16, 11:25 PM   #3
ClydeTim
Banned.
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Bikes: Trek
Posts: 748
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 264 Post(s)
Being a Clyde I am not a fan of low entry level bikes. The components may work OK but as mentioned, 105 is nice and durable. Low end components are bothersome as one must keep making adjustments.

The Giant bike has low spoke count wheels (24/28) and the Trek doesn't list the spoke count. But in my experience, you will be spending some cash for a new rear wheel not long after you buy a low end bike. I thrash stock wheels like there is no tomorrow on bikes that cost $1500-$2000.

Start saving for a good set of wheels, or maybe even just a strong hand built rear wheel at your weight.

Last edited by ClydeTim; 11-04-16 at 11:04 AM.
ClydeTim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-16, 11:45 PM   #4
decentdrummer91
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by edawg55 View Post
I just joined the site. Sorry another noob here...I started cycling this summer. I have a cheap bike now. I don't want to put any money into it. I'm looking to buy a road bike max of $600. I don't feel comfortable buying a used bike. I'm a big guy 5"11 250lbs. I've found some deals on Amazon but would rather buy locally so I can ride it first. Here are some of the bikes I'm looking at in not particular order. Any suggestions would be appricated.


I road this and like it a lot. I got the body scan and 58cm is what I should get.
https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/contend-3

I can get a discount on this 2016 Trek 1.1. They have a 58cm and 60cm. I can get a better discount on the 60cm if that would work for me.
1.1 | Trek Bikes


Fuji Sportif 2.5 Road Bike - 2016
Hi Im fairly new to this website but not a new rider, been at it for a while.

First I want to say don't be afraid to buy a used bike. You just have to know what to look out for.

I have a 2015 Fuji sportif 2.5, and I view it as a good entry level road bike. But I grew out of it pretty quickly. I just felt like I was going too slow. Before that I had a vintage trek 1200. Going to the Fuji was a big upgrade because of the shifters located on the brakes . I got a great deal on a used carbon triathlon bike, and I am just flying around town on it. It's about 10 pounds lighter than my Fuji. The sportif 2.5 is still a good starter bike though. Had tons of fun rides on it. Don't worry about getting the 61cm frame, it will be a bit heavier than the 58cm. I am 6'4 and mine is 58cm, And with some adjustments it fits fine.

One more thing to think about, when you buy anything new, and go to sell it one day, you automatically lose a lot of money. Hope my post wasn't too big. Happy riding 😁
decentdrummer91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-16, 11:47 PM   #5
decentdrummer91
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 151
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 73 Post(s)
One more thing don't apologize for being a noob. And don't let idiots try to make you feel bad for asking, I made a post asking for information and some people who are angry at life tried to makenme feel dumb. But their plans failed 😃
decentdrummer91 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 05:38 AM   #6
edawg55
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Columbus, Ohio Go Buckeyes!
Bikes: Raleigh Merit 3
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
I don't see any option to thank replies so thanks. lol

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClydeTim View Post
Being a Clyde I am not a fan of low entry level bikes. The components may work OK but as mentioned, 105 is nice and durable. Low end components are bothersome as one must keep making adjustments.

The Gina bike has low spoke count wheels (24/28) and the Trek doesn't list the spoke count. But in my experience, you will be spending some cash for a new rear wheel not long after you buy a low end bike. I thrash stock wheels like there is no tomorrow on bikes that cost $1500-$2000.

Start saving for a good set of wheels, or maybe even just a strong hand built rear wheel at your weight.
Man that sounds like I'm really heavy. lol I have some muscle but working on the damn beer belly. hehe

Quote:
Originally Posted by decentdrummer91 View Post
One more thing don't apologize for being a noob. And don't let idiots try to make you feel bad for asking, I made a post asking for information and some people who are angry at life tried to makenme feel dumb. But their plans failed 😃
thanks. I just want a bike quick because it's going to get cold soon well surprisingly it was 80 a few days which is crazy for November in Ohio. I know I shouldn't rush getting a bike though.
edawg55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 06:46 AM   #7
kuroba
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Chile
Bikes:
Posts: 405
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 100 Post(s)
I have the Shimano A070 shifters on my bike and while they work ok they use a thumb button which is kind of annoying.

I'd personally go for the Contend 3, which seems to have an easier gearing. If it's hilly where you live or you struggle with climbing, it's something to consider. It also comes with Tektro brakes, the others with no-name brakes and that doesn't inspire me much confidence.

Whatever you get, please come back and share pics
kuroba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 06:51 AM   #8
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 5,027
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 457 Post(s)
On paper, the Giant looks like a decent, entry level bike. I concur with others though that the low spoke count wheels at that entry level price are not great for a 250 lb rider. I weigh a bit more than you, but I have been as low as 250, as high as 290 over the years, and lower spoke count wheels have not held up for me. I would go at least 32 spokes on the front, 36 on the back. If you got down to 200 lbs or less, you could get away with 28 spokes front, 32 spokes rear.

Not a big deal, but you have to budget another couple of hundred or so for sturdier wheels, or find a bike that comes stock with better wheels.

The Trek looks pretty similar. Didn't see about the spoke count on the wheels, so check that out.

My advice is, take your time, and choose carefully. For most, a bike is a long term (5 years or more) purchase, and it usually makes sense to start with a bike you like than to try and upgrade an entry level bike to something mid range or high end. So make sure you find one that meets your needs AND gets you excited about riding. Comfort comes first. Not comfort as in sitting in your favorite recliner, but as in, when you get up to speed, does it feel like you could ride it for a couple of hours, or do you feel thankful when your ride is over? If you can get into a comfortable position, hopefully you can ride efficiently, which is what you want. Then find a bike with components you can live with. For some, that is entry level Claris or Sora. For others, it is 105 or Ultegra. And for others, Tiagra is fine. Test ride bikes at different price points and decide for yourself.

Last edited by MRT2; 11-04-16 at 07:01 AM.
MRT2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 07:12 AM   #9
12strings
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Madison, IN
Bikes: 2015 Jamis Quest Comp
Posts: 1,126
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 186 Post(s)
If you have $600 to spend, then a Contend or Trek 1.1 would be a great starting place.

Claris shifters and components function perfectly well. YouTube will tell you how to keep them adjusted and working properly.

WHEELS:

1. Most likely, if you just ride somewhat carefully and don't do curb jumps or potholes or speed bumps too fast, you wheels will hold up fine for awhile.

2. In the case that you find out that 250lbs is too much for the wheels, you an easily find a stronger (more spokes) wheel or wheel-set for around $100-150 when the time comes if you aren't concerned with getting super-light wheels. (this could be an option if the need arises: Vuelta Corsa HD Road Wheelset)

But I wouldn't worry about it until something happens. The simple fact is, you could spend 2 or 3x your budget and still not get much more durable stock wheels on a bike.

Also, if the prices are comparable...the Trek looks like it has a carbon fork, if that makes a difference to you...if you can test ride both, that's ideal.
12strings is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 08:17 AM   #10
doctor j
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Central Louisiana
Bikes:
Posts: 3,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
My old '06 Fuji Newest with Sora drive train has 26,000 miles on it and still rolling. Fuji is good bang for the buck. The cheap, high-spoke-count Alex wheels that came on it lasted 25,000 miles.
doctor j is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 08:20 AM   #11
edawg55
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Columbus, Ohio Go Buckeyes!
Bikes: Raleigh Merit 3
Posts: 132
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 57 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuroba View Post
I have the Shimano A070 shifters on my bike and while they work ok they use a thumb button which is kind of annoying.

I'd personally go for the Contend 3, which seems to have an easier gearing. If it's hilly where you live or you struggle with climbing, it's something to consider. It also comes with Tektro brakes, the others with no-name brakes and that doesn't inspire me much confidence.

Whatever you get, please come back and share pics
What's funny is I didn't really know how to shift the bike even though the salesman showed me. I'm glad you told me that because I think that would annoy me. I'll check out the Contend 3. Looks like the same price $600.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MRT2 View Post
On paper, the Giant looks like a decent, entry level bike. I concur with others though that the low spoke count wheels at that entry level price are not great for a 250 lb rider. I weigh a bit more than you, but I have been as low as 250, as high as 290 over the years, and lower spoke count wheels have not held up for me. I would go at least 32 spokes on the front, 36 on the back. If you got down to 200 lbs or less, you could get away with 28 spokes front, 32 spokes rear.

Not a big deal, but you have to budget another couple of hundred or so for sturdier wheels, or find a bike that comes stock with better wheels.

The Trek looks pretty similar. Didn't see about the spoke count on the wheels, so check that out.

My advice is, take your time, and choose carefully. For most, a bike is a long term (5 years or more) purchase, and it usually makes sense to start with a bike you like than to try and upgrade an entry level bike to something mid range or high end. So make sure you find one that meets your needs AND gets you excited about riding. Comfort comes first. Not comfort as in sitting in your favorite recliner, but as in, when you get up to speed, does it feel like you could ride it for a couple of hours, or do you feel thankful when your ride is over? If you can get into a comfortable position, hopefully you can ride efficiently, which is what you want. Then find a bike with components you can live with. For some, that is entry level Claris or Sora. For others, it is 105 or Ultegra. And for others, Tiagra is fine. Test ride bikes at different price points and decide for yourself.
Thanks for the input. The weight definitely goes on quicker then it comes off. I'm sure if I stop drinking and ride I'll lose some weight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 12strings View Post
If you have $600 to spend, then a Contend or Trek 1.1 would be a great starting place.

Claris shifters and components function perfectly well. YouTube will tell you how to keep them adjusted and working properly.

WHEELS:

1. Most likely, if you just ride somewhat carefully and don't do curb jumps or potholes or speed bumps too fast, you wheels will hold up fine for awhile.

2. In the case that you find out that 250lbs is too much for the wheels, you an easily find a stronger (more spokes) wheel or wheel-set for around $100-150 when the time comes if you aren't concerned with getting super-light wheels. (this could be an option if the need arises: Vuelta Corsa HD Road Wheelset)

But I wouldn't worry about it until something happens. The simple fact is, you could spend 2 or 3x your budget and still not get much more durable stock wheels on a bike.

Also, if the prices are comparable...the Trek looks like it has a carbon fork, if that makes a difference to you...if you can test ride both, that's ideal.
I ride on paths that have some bumps but I'm pretty careful not hitting them. I usually lift my butt up. lol
edawg55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 08:28 AM   #12
Sldrvr
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Bikes:
Posts: 47
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
I am about the same height as you and close to your weight at 235, I would strongly recommend getting a cursory size check before buying a 58 or 60cm bike. I just purchased a 56cm road bike and would absolutely be too outstretched on 58 or 60cm, my size range was 54-56 but different mfgs may be slightly different so you may want to check their website. I know they can also do things with seat height and necks to adjust but if it is too big there is only so much adjusting one can do... I am a noob as well so don't feel alone lol..
Sldrvr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 08:55 AM   #13
rekmeyata
Senior Member
 
rekmeyata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 8,350
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Personally I would forget the Fuji due to the low end Shimano Tourney that it uses.

There isn't a whole lot of difference between the Trek and the Giant to make arguing points in favor of one over the other.

I do agree that the wheels should be upgraded, when is the question. If you are buying the bike through a local bike shop (LBS) I would talk with them about the possibility of doing a swap BEFORE you take the bike off the floor and home, for a set of 36 spoke wheels. Some LBS's will do that and simply charge you for any cost difference for the better wheels, in other words they would give you credit for the original wheelset towards the cost of the other one. If they'll do that it will save you money over the long haul so you don't end up replacing a wheelset in 5,000 or so miles. Most LBS's sell and have in stock these sort of wheels, if not they can order them, Velocity makes a great wheelset called the Dyad which is a really strong 36 hole rim and some LBS's do carry these, there are other brands too that make good wheelsets.
rekmeyata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 09:00 AM   #14
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 8
Posts: 25,896
Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2256 Post(s)
Trek is fine . good Company, There is a Trek dealership, here..

to repeat : pick the Shop you like for after sale Service. get a bike there ..

many brands come out of very few OEM Factories now, so brands of bikes sold in bike shops ,

at same price point will be more similar than different. don't sweat the small stuff . parts are interchangeable.




'/,
fietsbob is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 09:26 AM   #15
Cougrrcj 
Over forty victim of Fate
 
Cougrrcj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: NE Ohio / Phoenix AZ
Bikes: A few...
Posts: 2,467
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 150 Post(s)
Lots of used road bikes in your size on the Columbus Craigslist.

https://columbus.craigslist.org/bik/5829932717.html

This one needs a new front derailleur, but at only $99 you can't go wrong...
https://columbus.craigslist.org/bid/5854724486.html
__________________
'75 Fuji S-10S bought new, 45k+ miles and still going!
'84 Univega Gran Tourismo
'84 Univega Viva Sport
'86 Miyata 710
'90 Schwinn Woodlands
Huffy MTB - for trips to corner store
MTB of questionable lineage aka 'Mutt Trail Bike'

Cougrrcj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 09:37 AM   #16
GerryinHouston
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Houston
Bikes: Novarra Randonee 2016, Trek Verve 2 2015
Posts: 409
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 33 Post(s)
At 250 or more, you may wish to look into touring bikes (used, I think only Fuji makes one near the $600 range). You will get sturdy 36 spoke wheels, a more user-friendly triple in the front and, likely (since it will likely be used) better components.

I took this route with my Novara Randonee (new for $950 during REI's annual sale), Mavic 36 spoke wheels, Sora components. Tough to find an owner willing to sell...
GerryinHouston is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 09:47 AM   #17
Maxacceleration
I like bikes
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: NCW
Bikes: A couple new and a couple old
Posts: 156
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
The Fuji Touring bike could be a good choice. Its made to carry extra weight, and it comes with 36 spoke count wheels.
If I remember correctly (?) you can upgrade to your shifting to on your brake levers (vs touring bar end style shifting).
Its a great looking touring bike to boot.
Maxacceleration is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 10:06 AM   #18
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit
Bikes: 1978 Schwinn Le Tour III (go drink)
Posts: 4,206
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Just out of curiosity, what do you mean by "cheap" bike, and what about it doesn't suit you now?

IMO, the best place to start is to identify exactly why you are looking for a new bike, and use that criteria to guide you

Quote:
Originally Posted by edawg55 View Post
Man that sounds like I'm really heavy. lol I have some muscle but working on the damn beer belly. hehe

thanks. I just want a bike quick because it's going to get cold soon well surprisingly it was 80 a few days which is crazy for November in Ohio. I know I shouldn't rush getting a bike though.
As one with a beer belly, I'd highly suggest you try the bikes out, and ensure the fit works with your belly. There is no way I can get myself into the good aero pose I'd need for many sizing systems.

Also, unless you foresee a lot of riding in the winter, I wouldn't be in a massive rush to buy now just to get a couple weeks on it. I know most of the LBS near me have sales in the springtime trying to clear out old stock.
jefnvk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 10:08 AM   #19
rekmeyata
Senior Member
 
rekmeyata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Bikes:
Posts: 8,350
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 550 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxacceleration View Post
The Fuji Touring bike could be a good choice. Its made to carry extra weight, and it comes with 36 spoke count wheels.
If I remember correctly (?) you can upgrade to your shifting to on your brake levers (vs touring bar end style shifting).
Its a great looking touring bike to boot.
This is a great idea, I didn't realize the Fuji Touring price was that low, I would go this route instead of the other choices and then have to go through the hassle of hoping the lbs will do a wheel swap, plus the frame is more stout than either of the other three. The Alievo components are one up from tourney but one below Claris which should be ok for a while, but it's cheaper to replace a failed component than a failed wheel and it will probably last quite a bit longer than a wheel will.
rekmeyata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 10:31 AM   #20
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 5,027
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 457 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
This is a great idea, I didn't realize the Fuji Touring price was that low, I would go this route instead of the other choices and then have to go through the hassle of hoping the lbs will do a wheel swap, plus the frame is more stout than either of the other three. The Alievo components are one up from tourney but one below Claris which should be ok for a while, but it's cheaper to replace a failed component than a failed wheel and it will probably last quite a bit longer than a wheel will.
The price is right, and the wheels are better suited for a 250 lb rider. It is over 28 lbs though. Not really a big deal, but about 4 lbs heavier than, say the Trek 1.1. On the other hand, the triple crankset is better suited to heavier riders, as is the clearance for wider tires.

All depends what you want to do. i split the difference with my current bike. Not a true road bike, but not a a true loaded touring bike either.
MRT2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 10:41 AM   #21
jefnvk
Senior Member
 
jefnvk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Metro Detroit
Bikes: 1978 Schwinn Le Tour III (go drink)
Posts: 4,206
Mentioned: 25 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1524 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
This is a great idea, I didn't realize the Fuji Touring price was that low,
Although, the one consideration (dunno if it matters to the OP or not) is the Fuji Touring is bar end shifters, not brifters. Swapping them out, if important, will add cost.
jefnvk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 10:46 AM   #22
MRT2
Senior Member
 
MRT2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Wisconsin
Bikes: 2012 Salsa Casseroll, 2009 Kona Blast, 1997 Bianchi Advantage, 1994 Trek 930.
Posts: 5,027
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 457 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefnvk View Post
Although, the one consideration (dunno if it matters to the OP or not) is the Fuji Touring is bar end shifters, not brifters. Swapping them out, if important, will add cost.
It would. If op went the touring bike route, maybe needs to just decide if he can live with bar end shifters. Some cyclists prefer them.
MRT2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 10:51 AM   #23
Lazyass
Senior Member
 
Lazyass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: NC
Bikes:
Posts: 5,858
Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 568 Post(s)
Wait another 3 weeks for the Black Friday sales then check out Performance Bike again.
Lazyass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 10:55 AM   #24
Flip Flop Rider
Senior Member
 
Flip Flop Rider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: South Carolina Upstate
Bikes: 2010 Fuji Absolute 3.0 1994 Trek 850
Posts: 215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Fit, Fit, Fit

and wide tires (at least 700x35)

flat bar is fine if you add bar ends (drop bars are good too)

whatever brand you choose, get these things
Flip Flop Rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-16, 11:06 AM   #25
Wilfred Laurier
Seņor Member
 
Wilfred Laurier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 4,023
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 222 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
This is a great idea, I didn't realize the Fuji Touring price was that low, I would go this route instead of the other choices and then have to go through the hassle of hoping the lbs will do a wheel swap, plus the frame is more stout than either of the other three.
I am not personally familiar with the Fuji Touring, but it seems to be an insanely good value. If I were in the market for a touring bike I would have to argue with myself for some time to talk me out of buying one.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rekmeyata View Post
The Alievo components are one up from tourney but one below Claris which should be ok for a while, but it's cheaper to replace a failed component than a failed wheel and it will probably last quite a bit longer than a wheel will.
I think you are mistaken. I believe the group quality lineup for Shimano road and their roughly equivalent mountain groups is as follows (from most to least expensive):
Dura Ace/XTR, Ultegra/XT, 105/SLX, Tiagra/Deore, Sora/Alivio, Claris/Acera. So an Alivio derailleur is going to be slightly better than a Claris derailleur. And what does 'better' mean? WRT derailleur quality, you will probably get a slightly longer-lasting derailleur that will be easier to keep adjusted after a season or two of regular riding. Higher end stuff might be a little lighter and have slightly smoother action, bearings instead of bushings in the pulleys, etc. But I personally don't believe any of these things make a measurable or noticeable difference when the parts are new. Claris and Acera and Altus and the like are all fantastic value and work as well as the most expensive stuff when new, IME. If a bike I liked and that fit me well had any of those parts I would not hesitate for a second to buy it. Some parts may wear out and need replacing after a couple seasons, but this makes no difference if you want a bike right now. The minor quality differences between one entry level bike and another are far less important than the fit of the bike - a bike with high-end parts will not perform as well as a bike with lower end parts of the lower end bike fits better.
Wilfred Laurier is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:55 AM.


 
  • Ask a Question
    get answers from real people!
Click to start entering your question.
I HAVE A QUESTION