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Old 01-10-17, 08:27 PM   #26
Lazyass
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You have a virgin butt. You have to toughen up the flesh covering your sitbones before you start looking at throwing money down the toilet for new saddles.
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Old 01-10-17, 08:29 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by bulldog1935 View Post
This saddle ends up on everybody's invisible list. https://selleanatomica.com/

If there is a problem with them, the saddles stretch and don't last for distance riding. I tried two, and couldn't get them to last past 6 months.
But the people who swear by them wouldn't give them up for anything.


You betcha. That saddle will spoil you for any other, and it is invisible nearly from the start. (About a 10 mile break-in period).

You say you don't like them because they stretch, but they are supposed to. That's what the bolt on the front is for. Did you read the manual? That's expected behavior and the "stretching" is the saddle conforming to your sitting bones. They stop stretching after a while and you can always tighten it up if needed.
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Old 01-10-17, 08:42 PM   #28
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Saddle is way too low.
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Old 01-10-17, 08:45 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by TheChosenOne View Post
...Then I bought what seemed like decent bike shorts with the cushion and it was better but still some discomfort after a ride ... And if you guys can recommend me good regular, super comfortable saddles with a buttload of cushion to help with the pain that would be nice too.
Combining padded shorts and padded saddles led to more discomfort for me, rather than less. I tried three types of padded shorts (Pearl Izumi with semi-3D, AeroTech with plain padding, Baleaf with super-3D padding). The padding got soggy with perspiration. Within a week I had a painful rash and chafing from too much squirmy padding.

30+ years ago I wore the then-standard merino wool and thin leather chamois padding and was fine with that on a fairly hard saddle and road bike. But the thicker synthetic padding in the shorts and padded saddles just didn't go well together.

FWIW, one bike is a comfort hybrid with thickly padded saddle and spring underneath. The other is a somewhat more rigid saddle with gel or memory foam padding under a cloth cover.

Based on another bike forum member's suggestion I tried Champion wicking fabric boxer/briefs. Outstanding. Been wearing 'em since, more than seven months now, and still perfectly satisfied. The fabric wicks perspiration (and rain, in bad weather) and dries quickly, even through ordinary denim jeans. The fit is snug like cycling shorts, with a mesh pouch for frank and the beans.

I'm saving the padded bike shorts for when, or if, I get a road bike with unpadded saddle. Meanwhile they're sitting in a drawer.

Yeah, it takes awhile to toughen up the butt for longer rides. Yeah, even after months of riding there will be some days when the butt needs a break for a few moments or minutes every half hour or so. But overall cycling shouldn't be painful. The pleasure of moving under your own power should be a distraction from those minor annoyances. If it isn't something needs to be adjusted or changed.
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Old 01-10-17, 08:52 PM   #30
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I'm starting to think bike saddles need a radical new design change, mostly for men. I don't know to what, maybe something more like a motorbike seat, but has the bike saddle design ever been improved/updated over the decades?

We don't sit on anything like it elsewhere. Why the horn? It's not comfortable for men.

So I did search for radical bike saddle designs and there are many! Here's one that claims to

"ride with no pressure - absolutely ZERO - on the perineum, prostate, tailbone and genitalia."

Spongy Wonder noseless bicycle seat:



Noseless bicycle seats, hornless bicycle seats. Prevent impotence, prostate problems and urological issues for both male and female riders. - Spongy Wonder Noseless Bicycle Seats

You can order a custom size as well, which is unheard of!

There's also the Hobson seats

Anyone using one of these?

Last edited by MikeinFL; 01-10-17 at 09:13 PM.
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Old 01-10-17, 08:55 PM   #31
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I"m going to assume that the photo is not of you on your bike. If you're riding in jeans and underwear, it is nearly impossible to be comfortable on a bicycle.

Yeah it's not me, I just found a picture of what my riding position might look like
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Old 01-10-17, 09:01 PM   #32
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I'm starting to think bike saddles need a radical new design change, mostly for men. I don't know to what, maybe something more like a motorbike seat, but has the bike saddle design ever been improved/updated over the decades?

We don't sit on anything like it elsewhere. Why the horn? It's not comfortable for men.

So I did search for radical bike saddle designs and there are many! Here's one that claims to

"ride with no pressure - absolutely ZERO - on the perineum, prostate, tailbone and genitalia."

Spongy Wonder noseless bicycle seat:



Noseless bicycle seats, hornless bicycle seats. Prevent impotence, prostate problems and urological issues for both male and female riders. - Spongy Wonder Noseless Bicycle Seats

Anyone using one of these?
Looks good on paper, but I doubt it's comfortable to ride. Conventional saddle helps to stabilize the bike IMO. And I won't say no cyclist ever had "impotence, prostate problems and urological issues", but I think those problems are greatly exaggerated by those trying to sell a new saddle design.In fact, not one of my many cycling friends had such problems that could be traced to riding.
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Old 01-10-17, 09:27 PM   #33
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Looks good on paper, but I doubt it's comfortable to ride. Conventional saddle helps to stabilize the bike IMO. And I won't say no cyclist ever had "impotence, prostate problems and urological issues", but I think those problems are greatly exaggerated by those trying to sell a new saddle design.In fact, not one of my many cycling friends had such problems that could be traced to riding.
Do you think it's the saddle nose that makes a ride more stable? I don't see why
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Old 01-10-17, 09:51 PM   #34
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Do you think it's the saddle nose that makes a ride more stable? I don't see why
I think the bike is steered with your whole body, not only with the handlebars. And with a saddle as pictured, your body position, specially laterally, won't be as stable as with a conventional saddle. Just my opinion anyway, I've never tried such a saddle, but I'm somewhat retrogr... er, conservative about cycling and I think if 99% of saddles have had that shape for 100+ years there must be a good reason.
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Old 01-10-17, 09:55 PM   #35
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I think the bike is steered with your whole body, not only with the handlebars. And with a saddle as pictured, your body position, specially laterally, won't be as stable as with a conventional saddle. Just my opinion anyway, I've never tried such a saddle, but I'm somewhat retrogr... er, conservative about cycling and I think if 99% of saddles have had that shape for 100+ years there must be a good reason.
Now that I think about it I'm sure you're right, the nose makes it more stable, using your inner thigh. However, if noseless stops pain and discomfort may be a tradeoff some will want (leisure biker)
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Old 01-10-17, 10:19 PM   #36
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I've never ridden around the butt region.
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Old 01-10-17, 10:31 PM   #37
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You betcha. That saddle will spoil you for any other, and it is invisible nearly from the start. (About a 10 mile break-in period).

You say you don't like them because they stretch, but they are supposed to. That's what the bolt on the front is for. Did you read the manual? That's expected behavior and the "stretching" is the saddle conforming to your sitting bones. They stop stretching after a while and you can always tighten it up if needed.
Gee, ya think?
I've ridden a lot of miles and ridden through a lot of saddles - Brooks Champion, Special, Select, SA, Rivet.
Brooks Select and Rivet are the only saddles that last for me. I'm big, I ride aggressively, and I ride a long way. 6 months each had me way past halfway on both SA stretch bolts.
The Rivet, btw, is designed by Debra Banks who before that helped design the SA.
Rivet definitely has a break-in that SA doesn't, but Rivet also quits stretching after 100 mi.

The frame bent on the first SA, and I sold the second to buy one of the first Rivet Indy's that Debra made.
I rode that until it ridged, cut the ridge off with a sharp knife, and Debra increased the diameter of the rear hole to solve that problem - at my recommendation.
I just removed it yesterday with about 8000 mi, to put on my new Swallow Select.


(and this is still a good saddle - I'll probably take it back out in May to sweat on it)

My 10,000 mi B17 Select took a little stretch bolt last summer, and that's it. No guess if this saddle even has a limit, but I think it will triple what I've already put on it. What makes the Select last is the leather is 2mm thicker than the Standard Brooks grades, and even the Special (which has the standard leather with fancier finish - hand hammered copper rivets)


I've ridden Brooks Champion and Special until they ridged, then laced them to get the last few miles from them.



Here's the new Swallow Select

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Old 01-10-17, 10:37 PM   #38
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I tested one of these.
It did not work out.

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Old 01-10-17, 10:53 PM   #39
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OP,

Though a couple have come close, no one here seems to want to state the obvious. The saddle on a diamond-frame (conventional) bicycle is called a 'saddle', and not a 'seat', for a reason.

Unless one is riding in a bolt upright, sit-up-and-beg position, one shouldn't be 'sitting' on the bike's saddle. It is a support-point, along with the bars and the pedals. Your weight should be distributed evenly and dynamically between your arms/legs/arse, and will be if the bike is the right size and correctlly fitted to you and you gain some time on the bike. If, for example, you have your bike set up with the saddle set far too low -- as is all too common -- your arse will be sore because your legs aren't supporting their share of your weight properly. You'll also eventually cause damage to your knees.

There is some adaptation/toughening-up time involved in conditioning the sit bones to a given saddle, but that will take care of itself if you keep riding.

So, I'd suggest that you check your bike set-up/fit and just get riding. The more you ride, the stronger (in cycling terms) you'll get, and that discomfort will lessen and eventually go away. Then, if you have residual niggling issues, look at different saddles. A bike is a dynamic machine, not a sofa.
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Old 01-10-17, 11:06 PM   #40
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no, you should ride in your core muscles and not on your neck and shoulders - you should not be leaning on your arms unless you're braking.

Look at this guy - he got a syndrome named after him, and he's still riding with locked elbows and bent wrists



Contrast with Ian Hibell, who rode the length of the Americas (Alaska to Cape Horn).


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Old 01-10-17, 11:37 PM   #41
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So I am wondering if it is possible to be pain and discomfort free after riding a bike?
Maybe not zero pain, but so little pain it's not even worth mentioning.


What works:

1) Good bicycle fit

2) Handlebars even with or perhaps just slightly lower than the saddle

3) Good saddle

4) Good shorts

5) Strong core and upper body ... for good posture on the bicycle

6) Really good fitness level

7) And of course, along with the really good fitness level ... lots of saddle time.


I'll also add that a lot of new riders sit on their saddles ... they assume that's what it is there for. And it is, of course, but it isn't. Once you develop the good fitness level and strong core and upper body, you may discover that you are distributing your weight so that some of your weight will be on your butt, but much of your weight goes onto your feet ... and some will go onto your hands. This really helps for the comfort of the sitting area because you're not putting all your weight on your butt all the time.

Last edited by Machka; 01-10-17 at 11:41 PM.
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Old 01-10-17, 11:43 PM   #42
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I wouldn't say I am riding upright. My head is leaning at around 65-70 degree angle. Sort of like this:



Presuming the saddle is high enough ... that you've actually taken the time to get the saddle height right ... can you lower your handlebars?


Also, you're not riding in jeans are you?
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Old 01-10-17, 11:48 PM   #43
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that's not him - it's an example photo he found
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Old 01-10-17, 11:54 PM   #44
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that's not him - it's an example photo he found
I see.

Well, it's a good example photo of how to be uncomfortable on a bicycle for all but incredibly short rides.
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Old 01-11-17, 01:35 AM   #45
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There's good advice here, but anyone saying you should get "this" seat (I don't care how good it is) is missing an important piece. Our butts are as different as our faces. (And no, I have not looked. But I have taken note of what works for who for the past 40+ years. There is no consensus.)

I assume you bought your bike new. New bikes come with what the marketing department feels will best sell that bike. (How good a seat they provide varies quite a bit, by price range, type of bike and manufacturer philosophy. Not by any research into what will best suit your butt. The odds are very good there is a far better seat out there for you.

Several seat manufacturers provide similar seats with different widths. At least one also offers shops a tool to measure your sit bone width to better narrow down the choices. It is still a sit-on-it-and-see situation. Until you have done a real ride on a seat, you really don't know. More and more, shops are coming to realize that customers who get seats that work are happy customers and that it is their interest to invest a little more to enable that to happen. Many shops offer seats to use long enough to know with the ability to bring it back for another or a store credit if it isn't the one. A shop here in Portland, OR has a "library" (literally) of 25 seats. You pay $25 for a library card. For that you can take out any seat for a week. Over and over with different seats until you find the one. Buy it and your card money goes toward it.

The shape of the seat is what is important. If the shape is right for your butt, the seat needs very little padding. In fact, on a good fitting seat, you will want very little padding. Thickly padded shorts help make poor seats ridable but are not needed for good fitting seats. Now, that said, there is a break-in period for our butts. 20 years away and it will take a while, perhaps several hundred miles to be able to ride and not feel it later. But reasonably long rides should not be killers. If they are, something isn't right.

Another aspect I haven't gotten into here but others have touched - bike fit. If seat height, fore and aft location or tilt aren't right or overall weight distribution is skewed, you are asking a lot from the seat's shape and it probably will not be up to the task.

Ask your shop if they have a trial period for seats. (If they say no, you might suggest they go on-line to the Gladys Bikes library for some ideas. The Saddle Library ? Gladys Bikes - Portland's Women*-Focused Bike Shop )

Ben
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Old 01-11-17, 01:45 AM   #46
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Maybe not zero pain, but so little pain it's not even worth mentioning.


What works:

1) Good bicycle fit
Further to good bicycle fit ... which is the first step, the most important step ...

Most people will install a saddle straight. They'll line it up with their top tubes and tap it a bit on this side and that side to get it perfectly straight.

That may work for some, but some prefer their saddles with the nose slightly off to one side or the other.

I have discovered, after many years of cycling, that I like the nose of my saddles pointing just slightly off to the left. Probably has something to do with the difference in my leg lengths.
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Old 01-11-17, 06:38 AM   #47
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Presumably, the OP is asking if it's possible to ride HIS bike comfortably, so I won't mention the "R" word as a possibility.
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Old 01-11-17, 06:51 AM   #48
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if you have a bigger rear end don't you need a larger saddle? in the photo looks like the saddle is way too small for him. not sure, just looks that way to me

the Bell Comfort Wide Cruiser Bike Saddle:


however, this may not develop "butt calluses"
No, it doesn't work that way. The saddle does need to support your sit bones, not all the extra flesh around them. And, that wide saddle will chafe your thighs terribly.
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Old 01-11-17, 07:03 AM   #49
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No, it doesn't work that way. The saddle does need to support your sit bones, not all the extra flesh around them. And, that wide saddle will chafe your thighs terribly.
which is the entire logic around the 120-y-o hammock leather saddles, a design that was never broken.

The sofa-sized variant is the Brooks B72

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Old 01-11-17, 07:56 AM   #50
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Gee, ya think?
I've ridden a lot of miles and ridden through a lot of saddles - Brooks Champion, Special, Select, SA, Rivet.
Brooks Select and Rivet are the only saddles that last for me. I'm big, I ride aggressively, and I ride a long way. 6 months each had me way past halfway on both SA stretch bolts.
The Rivet, btw, is designed by Debra Banks who before that helped design the SA....
The design concept is obviously the same with the Rivet as the SA. I like the "sling" idea and the fact that these never ridge. But are you saying that the Rivets are built sturdier than the SA? Selle Anatomica does say in their literature that it's for riders "up to 250 lbs" if I'm not mistaken so that does leave room for bigger guys breaking rails now and then. I'm only about 190 lbs.

I have SA saddles on three of my bikes and they have stopped stretching except for the one I bought at the end of last year.
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