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Old 04-20-17, 09:25 PM   #1
DreamRider85
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I'm gonna go back to Standard Pedals

For now.. Long time no hear, I'm back. I haven't been riding consistently. It's been raining hard in the bay area but the weather is finally getting better. I became an Uber Driver, but now I need to get back to my cycling as I've lost some endurance.

Clipless Pedals have their perks. At times I feel my stroke is good. But I feel kind of locked in. I have recently fallen twice. I had a guy who walked right in front of me and for some reason my brain didn't react fast enough in time to take my foot off the pedal. So the guy told me he didn't hear my bell. Instead of getting out of the way, he patted me on the back while I was on my bike.

Then today the chain snapped off of my bike and I tried to twist my foot out and it was too late and I feel hard and hurt my knee.

So I realized that it's not worth it to go clipless anymore. What I need is standard pedals and some solid shoes. But I like the clipless pedals, but might just use them for special occasions. I find that overall they're too dangerous.

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Old 04-20-17, 09:30 PM   #2
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Sorry to hear of your bad luck, but glad to hear you're back on the bike.

There's no need to explain or justify your decision to go back to flat pedals, just as there's no need to explain or justify ANY decision we make in where or how we ride.

BTW among my various bikes, I have clipless, toe clip/strap and plain pedals, and each reflects what I think is right for that application.
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Old 04-20-17, 09:34 PM   #3
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Sorry to hear of your bad luck, but glad to hear you're back on the bike.

There's no need to explain or justify your decision to go back to flat pedals, just as there's no need to explain or justify ANY decision we make in where or how we ride.

BTW among my various bikes, I have clipless, toe clip/strap and plain pedals, and each reflects what I think is right for that application.


Is it hard to switch back and forth? And also do I need new shoes for the standard pedals? I use mountain bike shoes with clips for my clipless pedals.
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Old 04-20-17, 09:41 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
For now.. Long time no hear, I'm back. I haven't been riding consistently. It's been raining hard in the bay area but the weather is finally getting better. I became an Uber Driver, but now I need to get back to my cycling as I've lost some endurance.

Clipless Pedals have their perks. At times I feel my stroke is good. But I feel kind of locked in. I have recently fallen twice. I had a guy who walked right in front of me and for some reason my brain didn't react fast enough in time to take my foot off the pedal. So the guy told me he didn't hear my bell. Instead of getting out of the way, he patted me on the back while I was on my bike.

Then today the chain snapped off of my bike and I tried to twist my foot out and it was too late and I feel hard and hurt my knee.

So I realized that it's not worth it to go clipless anymore. What I need is standard pedals and some solid shoes. But I like the clipless pedals, but might just use them for special occasions. I find that overall they're too dangerous.
I hear you, I have no use for clipless pedals (I also don't understand the terminology, the have bloody clips!!!)

I use these pedals:

VP-196 - VP Components




And with them, these strapless nylon clips:

VP-700 - VP Components





Best of worlds for me. The pedals are light-weight, all alloy, only 264g/pair, with nice smooth sealed roller bearings.

The clips are awesome - I initially installed the same VP brand nylon ones, but the kind with the straps, they were pretty good, but I sometimes felt a bit too "locked in", even though I left the straps loose.

Then I gave the strapless ones a try, and honestly, I found they have all of the benefits of the strap variety, with no discernible downside (IE, I get nice firm footing, never slip off the pedals, and can still pedal on the upstroke to the same degree if I want), but I am never "locked in", I can get both in and out of these instantly with any kind of shoes. Plus, they look nice and sleek, not clunky like the strapped variety do.

Give them a try, you might find these to be a great alternative as I did.

Cheers
TRJB
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Old 04-20-17, 09:41 PM   #5
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Is it hard to switch back and forth? And also do I need new shoes for the standard pedals? I use mountain bike shoes with clips for my clipless pedals.
I have no problem switching back and forth.

But, long ago when I first went clip-less I did have a few embarrassing falls. It is just not that different to me from standard caged pedals. Now if you mean pedals without a cage, well, yes, that is different.

Sounds like you have just never made the transition or invested (time and practice) in it.
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Old 04-20-17, 09:44 PM   #6
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You would be real happy with these.

VO Deep Half Clips
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Old 04-20-17, 09:57 PM   #7
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Have you ever tried any of the Shimano Click'R pedals? They're basically like the standard SPD, but the release tension can be set so light one can just lift their foot off the pedal normally.

I like Shimano campus pedals like the M324 or M420 which are platform on one side, and Click'R SPD on the other.

If I use one type of pedal exclusively for several weeks or more, it might take me a minute or so to mentally adjust, but that's it.
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Old 04-20-17, 10:10 PM   #8
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Is it hard to switch back and forth? And also do I need new shoes for the standard pedals? I use mountain bike shoes with clips for my clipless pedals.
No, apparently my brain can manage 3 or more "programs" and I can switch back and forth among the bikes seamlessly. That also includes switching from my road and track bikes, where I "know" coasting isn't an option.

I think there may be a learning curve for things like clipless pedals or fixed wheel bikes, but once learned switching isn't an issue.
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Old 04-21-17, 03:16 AM   #9
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If your talking about riding with flat pedals then it will eliminate getting your feet caught on the pedals. BUT.. if you're talking about going to clips and straps I thing they are way worse than spuds. For me personaly the clips hurt my toes on a long ride
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Old 04-21-17, 03:42 AM   #10
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Flats with those toe holders look good.

I did flat pedals for years and I honestly believe they saved me health on several occasions because I was a crazy commuter in bad traffic and being able to get away from the bike--to dive and roll--is a huge benefit. I went to rat traps, then clips.

Clips are great---all i need is special pedals, special shoes, and then adjust the tension so I can get out easily but not pull out accidentally, knowing that in case of a crash they will unclip on their own----if and only if I get hit really hard.

My favorite part is trying to clip in. Often it works perfectly ... but since I really only unclip at intersections with traffic, .....

I think I am buying some of those toe clips for my routing bike, just to test them.

Being able to put a foot down at will is so nice.
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Old 04-21-17, 03:48 AM   #11
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If your talking about riding with flat pedals then it will eliminate getting your feet caught on the pedals. BUT.. if you're talking about going to clips and straps I thing they are way worse than spuds. For me personaly the clips hurt my toes on a long ride


I've learned that you can't get the best of all worlds with this. When I'm not clipped in, I want to be clipped in. When I'm clipped in, I feel too locked in and not free. When you use toe clips, they hurt your toes on long rides. I guess the ultimate solution is we could have all 3 in one ride, like if the bike could magically change itself.
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Old 04-21-17, 07:26 AM   #12
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I use clips and toe straps, but keep them loose. I would probably be happy with strapless, but I'm happy with my setup. But as others have said, you have to make decisions as to what is right for you, how you ride, and how riding fits into your life.

I like being able to wear conventional sneakers while riding (well actually skateboard sneakers with stiffish soles). They're comfortable and cheap and if they get too filthy or dirty, I'm not out a lot of money (although this last $20 pair is going on four years). BUt I have had instances where the toe clips scuffed and ruined some nicer shoes. In that respect pure platform pedals would be better for the uppers of shoes, although if you ran platforms with pins, the bottoms might get torn up over time.

It is no different than bike fit. There are general guidlines, but ultimately you have to ride "your ride" and do what works for you.
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Old 04-21-17, 07:59 AM   #13
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I've been riding nothing but platform pedals on my ATB commuter since I bought it in 2002. Recently, I've been riding the C&V with Lyotard pedals with no toe clips (a few good 20 milers already).
Both are just fine, and I see no real benefit/deficit contrasted with my Speedplay/Lake setup on my road bike, so I don't intend to change anything on the Raleigh.
It might be just a matter of time till I pop a chain or something drastic to maybe twist or cause extra tension to my foot or ankle(s) on the clipless setup, but they've been fine for four years and I have no complaints. Actually, I've broken a chain while clipped in and had no problem.
Both systems are good, but if you are not competing (even with yourself), I can see why some people might go back to platforms. Especially since the new, better ones are so light and efficient.
All you need is a shoe with a good, stiff sole to power your pedal stroke and prevent uneven muscular tension in your feet. The Sofsoles 3/4 Orthotic (woven nylon) insole does it for me with my trail runners.

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Old 04-21-17, 08:03 AM   #14
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Flat pedals get a bad rap because people immediately think of the older, narrower rat-trap pedals from the 70s. Modern MTB and urban pedals offer much more support and traction and really don't require any secondary/additional retention devices (assuming that you're not riding in hard-soled dress shoes).

MTB pedals with sharp pins definitely tear up softer soles. My mountain bike is equipped with Spank Oozy pedals, and the pins have left noticeable divots in my 5.10's soles.
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Old 04-21-17, 09:02 AM   #15
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I am a long time clipless guy for both road and mtb (but not commuting or errands).

But over the past couple years as my road riding and commuting began to be less seperately defined (and using my road bike around town more), I just started leaving the flat petals on the road bike full-time. At first it was just convienience ( too lazy to swap out the pedals). But after a while, I found I prefer the flats . I find I get fewer pains in my feet or legs on long rides. I assume this is because my feet can move around a little bit therefore changing the pedaling mechanics slightly and helping alleviate overuse issues.

However, for mtb I still prefer clipless. In the rough stuff and in the air I like being attached to the bike. Never have an issue unclipping when I need to.

I am the only person I know of who runs clipless on their mountain bike and flat petals on the road bike.
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Old 04-21-17, 09:13 AM   #16
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I'm with @BobbyG - it is nice at times to just be able to jump on with whatever shoes you are wearing. I've got Giro MTB shoes without the cleat, simply for the stiff sole, but often I just ride in whatever sneakers I have on. I do 40-50 mile rides just fine doing so, all my bikes have platform pedals. And yes, some of those styles from the 70s and 80s are quite painful, but I've found styles that work for me.
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Old 04-21-17, 10:12 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
Is it hard to switch back and forth? And also do I need new shoes for the standard pedals? I use mountain bike shoes with clips for my clipless pedals.
I change my clipless pedals on my commuting bike back to rat-traps (with half-clips) for the winter months. This allows me to wear insulated shoes that keep my toes nice and toasty. No real issue going back and forth. Also no problem continuing to use your MB shoes. They should have come with an insert that covers the cleat location - just reinstall and Bob's your uncle.

Good luck
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Old 04-21-17, 10:23 AM   #18
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I use the Click'r pedals someone suggested and indeed they're very easy to use. In case of an emergency I just lift up my foot and the cleat releases easily.
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Old 04-21-17, 10:58 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by DreamRider85 View Post
For now.. Long time no hear, I'm back. I haven't been riding consistently. It's been raining hard in the bay area but the weather is finally getting better. I became an Uber Driver, but now I need to get back to my cycling as I've lost some endurance.

Clipless Pedals have their perks. At times I feel my stroke is good. But I feel kind of locked in. I have recently fallen twice. I had a guy who walked right in front of me and for some reason my brain didn't react fast enough in time to take my foot off the pedal. So the guy told me he didn't hear my bell. Instead of getting out of the way, he patted me on the back while I was on my bike.

Then today the chain snapped off of my bike and I tried to twist my foot out and it was too late and I feel hard and hurt my knee.

So I realized that it's not worth it to go clipless anymore. What I need is standard pedals and some solid shoes. But I like the clipless pedals, but might just use them for special occasions. I find that overall they're too dangerous.
I tried clipless pedals too but after a few bad falls due to panic stops where the foot being disengaged was in the wrong O'clock position on the pedal stroke (ie 12 O'clock) I too went back to toeclips and straps. For most of my riding I use the straps loose. I have a number of different toeclip equipped pedals including some old Shimano Adamas AX ones. What i like about the toeclips and straps on my MTB is that in really wet riding conditions, in mud or on the fringes of the swamp, I can wear a pair of rubber Wellington boots and not have to worry about getting my feet covered in crap if i have to put a foot down or wade through a lot of muck/ooze.

Some people love clipless, other people love toeclips. there's nothing wrong with either. Just use what YOU find most comfortable and/or safest.

Cheers
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Old 04-21-17, 11:20 AM   #20
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I'm not sure, if you ride flat pedals, that they will let you post here. Maybe ... Maybe in General Cycling ... certainly not in Road Cycling or Racing. I won't tell anybody but please, don't keep spreading it around. Don't ask, don't tell, you know? We'd hate to lose you.
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Old 04-21-17, 11:57 AM   #21
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I'm thinking that just even though you have flat pedals, you can still fall or crash. Been on clipless since they were invented and don't expect to ever go back. My big feet don't fit in toe clips and flat pedals are for BMX and jumping.
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Old 04-21-17, 12:24 PM   #22
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So I realized that it's not worth it to go clipless anymore. What I need is standard pedals and some solid shoes. But I like the clipless pedals, but might just use them for special occasions. I find that overall they're too dangerous.
I think you will have even more difficulties if you just mount the clipless occasionally. You are already having troubles with unclipping due to being out of practice.

So, if you go back too flats, then mount up your clipless for an annual century ride, you'll be in worse shape.

You have several decisions. Keep at it, and get out on the bike more? Dump them and go to flats? Try half-clips as suggested (more to learn)? Easier release pedals (multi-release, click-r, etc)?

I've heard that some flat pedals (pins) also hold the shoes in place better.
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Old 04-21-17, 12:29 PM   #23
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'nother little vote for mini or 1/2 clips
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Old 04-21-17, 12:32 PM   #24
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Clipless pedals don't provide full foot support.

I prefer wide platform pedals. Haven't looked back.
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Old 04-21-17, 12:44 PM   #25
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I hear you, I have no use for clipless pedals (I also don't understand the terminology, the have bloody clips!!!)
TRJB
I'm thinking the term clipless came from them not using toe clips.
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