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  1. #1
    Senior Member Cyclingmaniac's Avatar
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    Cassettes? Gears? Numbers? Help!!!!

    I'm number challenged! What do they mean? I have a 12-25 (cassette?) on the back and 39-53 (gear?) on the front. Do these numbers refer to the teeth? As an example: The back cassette(?) has a small ring with 12 teeth and the largest has 25 teeth? The front gear/chainring(?) has 39 teeth for the smaller ring and 53 teeth for the larger?

    Help me Mr. Wizzzzzzaaarrrrd!

  2. #2
    Spoked to Death phidauex's Avatar
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    Yup, you've got it maniac.

    Any other questions you need to answer for yourself?

    peace,
    sam

  3. #3
    Meow! my58vw's Avatar
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    Yep, got it...

    The larger the front ring the faster your rear wheels turns, the smaller the rear gear the faster the rear wheel turns.

    I.e. 39-25 (39 teeth front and 25 teeth rear) is the smallest gear, 53-12 would be your highest gear.
    Just your average club rider... :)

  4. #4
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    So what's your question? power/speed/ease of riding?

    Gears up front are called chainrings or chainring sets for a double or triple.

    Gears in back are called cassettes or cogs. It used to be you would make your own sets of gears in the rear and pick a series of cogs and mount them on a cassette like assembly. Each circle of metal here is called a cog. Now you just change one of the sets which you need new gears in the rear.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    A 12-25 cogset is pretty much standard; a good average. Touring or climbing cassettes may go up to 32 teeth, the normal limit for most rear derailleurs. Strong riders and racers may prefer a cogset that goes down to 11, with a 53-tooth "big ring".

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