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-   -   Mountain Bike vs Road Bike. (http://www.bikeforums.net/general-cycling-discussion/123746-mountain-bike-vs-road-bike.html)

harmstrong 07-21-05 10:28 AM

Mountain Bike vs Road Bike.
 
I have just started riding again. All the local trails I did ride on are now condo's so i am riding my mountain bike on the street. Is there any benefit to riding a street bike instead of a mountain bike? i have started at 12 miles at an average speed of 14mph half moderate hill and half flat.
Thanks.
Howard

RalphieTB 07-21-05 10:34 AM

I'd say yes. I recently picked up a used road bike, and I don't think I'll ever go back.

It's like the difference between a pick up truck and a sports car. A corvette is worthless off-road, and a 4x4 will still work in the city. But will it be as fun?

recursive 07-21-05 10:45 AM

Good analogy. After getting some road bikes, I can barely stand riding my hybrid. It pisses me off just thinking about it.

KingTermite 07-21-05 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by recursive
Good analogy. After getting some road bikes, I can barely stand riding my hybrid. It pisses me off just thinking about it.

I am possibly "almost" there myself.

Currently I am riding a Comfort that I put slicks on....am hopefully getting a road bike soon. A guy at work has an old Fuji.....he wants to just get rid of it, so I may have a *free* road bike soon (though I think it needs some work).

scoana 07-21-05 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by recursive
Good analogy. After getting some road bikes, I can barely stand riding my hybrid. It pisses me off just thinking about it.


Sell the hybrid to me.

recursive 07-21-05 11:17 AM

Well, I can't let it go yet, it's my rain bike right now. Once I get a ss/fixed or something though, I might have to get rid of the hybrid. It's a Raleigh C40, in reasonable riding condition, but with 3000-4000 miles and one winter on it with minimal maintenance on it during that time.

Replacements:
Metal bmx pedals
Chain
cassette
Right crank (not left) and chain rings
SRAM (i think) rear der

Notably, the tires are still original and probably have thousands of miles left on them. Those things are thick.

Anyway, you probably weren't serious, but there you go. If you really are interested, when I do sell it, it will probably be cheap, since I can't justify charging too much for it.

/derail

You may now return to the original topic.

cyccommute 07-21-05 11:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RalphieTB
I'd say yes. I recently picked up a used road bike, and I don't think I'll ever go back.

It's like the difference between a pick up truck and a sports car. A corvette is worthless off-road, and a 4x4 will still work in the city. But will it be as fun?

I look on them a little differently. I love the speed of a road bike. It is fun but tends to get boring after a while. A mountain bike is slow but more spontaneous. I always leave full, aggressive knobbies on my mountain bike. If I find a trail on the way home from work, I can jump on it and follow it where ever it goes. When I don't feel like being beat up by the trail or if I need to connect to another trail, the speed penalty from the knobbies isn't enough to worry about so I leave them on the bike. I also don't buy soft rubber compound tires because I don't generally need them for hard pack trails and I don't want to buy tires for the mountain bike all the time.

cydewaze 07-21-05 12:21 PM

I love road and mountain riding, and have a bike for both. My mountain bike rarely sees pavement, unless it's to get to a ride. I find that riding both also helps my fitness

- The road bike gives me the power and aerobic fitness to be fast on the mountain bike

- The mountain bike helps my bike handling skills on my road bike.

They are (to me) mutually beneficial. Plus, if it's REALLY hot outside, I find that riding my mtn bike helps keep me out of the sun, and in the shade of the woods.

scoana 07-21-05 12:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by recursive

Anyway, you probably weren't serious, but there you go. If you really are interested, when I do sell it, it will probably be cheap, since I can't justify charging too much for it.

/derail

You may now return to the original topic.



I was serious. I need an errand bike. PM me when you are ready.

Bikewer 07-21-05 02:41 PM

It's always a compromise. You can make the MTB better for pavement, but it was still designed for off-road use. Tons of people ride MTBs on the street as they find the durability and comfort suits them, and they are not interested in optimum speed and efficiency. I like cycommute's idea of being able to go pretty well where you want to; we do that to some degree on police bike patrol.

Still, as the old saw goes, "if you want to go far and fast, get a roadster".

cyccommute 07-21-05 02:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bikewer
It's always a compromise. You can make the MTB better for pavement, but it was still designed for off-road use. Tons of people ride MTBs on the street as they find the durability and comfort suits them, and they are not interested in optimum speed and efficiency. I like cycommute's idea of being able to go pretty well where you want to; we do that to some degree on police bike patrol.

Still, as the old saw goes, "if you want to go far and fast, get a roadster".

If I can only have one bike, I choose the mountain bike (hardtail not a dually). I had a work assignment for 2 summers in Vermont a few years ago and I took mountain bikes both times. It was really cool blasting down trails through the woods. We don't have those here.

It was also a blast to sail past a roadie like he was standing still because of the oxygen down there. We don't have a lot of that here, either :D

webist 07-21-05 03:10 PM

Both have utility. Your question seems to suggest that you intend to ride the road exclusively. In that case, I will pass on to you what a sage advisor in these forums told me a couple years ago when I asked a similar question to yours.

Draw a circle on a map where the circumfrence is 1 mile distant from your house or other starting point. Generally, this is what you will be able to see while jogging/running.

Draw another circle where the circumfrence is five miles distant. Generally, this is what you will see while riding a mountain/comfort bike on the road.

Draw a third circle with a circumfrence 10 miles distant from the center point. THis is your routine territory for a road bike.

Obviously, you can go farther, ride longer, transport any bike to a different starting point, etc. What he and I were talking about though is informal out-and-back rides from the house.

HiYoSilver 07-21-05 03:11 PM

In today's news, yahoo sports TDF
Quote:

Road bikes, which sell for an average of $1,150, accounted for 28 percent dollar sales by specialty dealers in 2004, up from 16 percent in 2002, according to the National Bicycle Dealers Association. Overall, the U.S. bicycling industry has remained flat since 1999

rmwun54 07-21-05 05:15 PM

I have four bikes, a two road, a tourer, and a mtb. And I use all of them on the road just for the change. But one road biek is for riding far and fast. The other road bike is for errands. The tourer is for all around and the mtb well you know for the trails. My feeling is that you can use most bikes for riding on the road as long as you can enjoy the ride.

toomyus 07-21-05 06:39 PM

i ride both mountain and rode. they have their own purposes. on a road bike is ur semi decent you wil average 16 plus, ive yet to find a mountian biker who can keep up with a roadie, unless ur lance.

toomyus 07-21-05 06:40 PM

oops, i mean , if ur semi decent, you can average 16 plus

FrankieFrank 07-21-05 07:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cyccommute
If I can only have one bike, I choose the mountain bike (hardtail not a dually). :D

cyccommute, why "hardtail" not "full suspension" or "no suspension"?

If I can have only 1 bike, I'll choose full suspension mountain bike.

If I can have 2 bikes, I'll choose 1 full suspension mountain bike and 1 no suspension road bike.

If I can have 3 bikes, I'll keep the first 2 bikes and sell the 3rd one to buy beer.

If I can have 4 bikes, I'll keep the first 2 bikes and sell the 3rd and 4th bikes to buy more beer.

If I can have 5 bikes, I'll be your LBS dealer.

phantomcow2 07-21-05 09:14 PM

I am pleased with my XC rig with slicks on it. Its 21-22 pounds so its not horribly heavy compared to road bikes, so its light enough that i can "zip" to say. Yet i frequently take it for small offroad trips on the way home, ride in the woods near the road instead of the road, stuff like that. The 1.4" slicks give good performance on the road, when pumped to 85 PSI they roll nicely, yet it still allows me to do MILD offroad in optimum conditions. In mud or anything less than optimum, forget it

UmneyDurak 07-21-05 11:47 PM

I'm a firm believer of getting a right tool for the job. If you are going off roading, and hitting dirt trails get a MTB. If you are thinking of ridding on roads all the time or commuting to work on the streets then get a "road" bike.

jeff williams 07-22-05 12:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by UmneyDurak
I'm a firm believer of getting a right tool for the job. If you are going off roading, and hitting dirt trails get a MTB. If you are thinking of ridding on roads all the time or commuting to work on the streets then get a "road" bike.

And if you only can do one bike, get 2 wheelsets for your mtb and run slicks and knobbies.
Go offroad, drive -go on vacation and mtb -and commute fAST with slicks.
A mtb will do both, road bike don't do well on trails.
Hands down offroad ridings more fun, get there. Sorry to hear about the condo's.

Or one tire.
http://www.serfas.com/tires/VSSK-F19.html Fast road -useable offroad.
Kevlar and cheaper than other K tires.
I liked.

motomickey 07-22-05 07:57 AM

It all depends on how gonzo you want to go. First try slicks, then figure out if you want a road bike. Then get a road bike. Right now I have 4 bikes:
Road Bike-for fast and fun-gets most use.
Cyclocross bike-Bad weather-bad roads bike
Full suspension Trailbike-hard core offroad where 5-6 inches of suspension is required to survive.
Full Suspension Cross country bike. Local easy loops, or fireroads, or rides with lots of climbs...
Next thing I have to do is start convincing the wife I need a single speed, and ........
Yes, I am an addict, but my bu** is getting smaller.....(not JUST the wallet)

FrankieFrank 07-22-05 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by motomickey
.....
Next thing I have to do is start convincing the wife I need a single speed, and ........
Yes, I am an addict, but my bu** is getting smaller.....(not JUST the wallet)

---------------------

Wait a minute, what of your bu** is getting smaller ?

cyccommute 07-22-05 01:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FrankieFrank
cyccommute, why "hardtail" not "full suspension" or "no suspension"?

If I can have only 1 bike, I'll choose full suspension mountain bike.

If I can have 2 bikes, I'll choose 1 full suspension mountain bike and 1 no suspension road bike.

If I can have 3 bikes, I'll keep the first 2 bikes and sell the 3rd one to buy beer.

If I can have 4 bikes, I'll keep the first 2 bikes and sell the 3rd and 4th bikes to buy more beer.

If I can have 5 bikes, I'll be your LBS dealer.

I have ridden rigid and hardtail until this past March when I got a dual suspension. I'm not sure I like it yet. I certainly don't like riding it any distance on a street, it just feels too weird. I can live with the bob in a front suspension but the bob of the rear suspension doesn't feel right yet. So I'd still stick with a hardtail

By the way, I have 10 bikes, so I guess I'm your distributer. :D


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