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Old 07-23-05, 08:34 AM   #1
jonathanrules
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new to riding, disappointed

i bought a new trek 1000 last week and i've been riding it a bunch around my local roads. it's fun and all, but i feel like my bike isn't allowing me to do what i wanted, ride fast. i row collegiately and have a lot of power in my legs and just feel like i'm not able to go as fast as i want in any gear. i was stubborn not to have waited a couple of weeks to get more money, but i wanted to get into it. do any of you think the shop i bought it from will still take a trade in for a higher end bike?
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Old 07-23-05, 09:35 AM   #2
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FWIW, you may be able to change the gear ratios on the bike (either by switching the chainrings to give you a larger gear up front, or by switching out the cassette in the rear to give you smaller cogs--maybe even both). The frame isn't necessarily what's keeping you from going "as fast as you want" (though I'm sure that's a relative term and I don't know how fast that really is). Bikes can go pretty fast...have you found a big hill?? If you already have a lot of power in your legs, upping the gear ratios may give you the satisfaction you are looking for cheaper than upgrading the frame.
Anyway, if you really want to trade it in, the bike shop MAY take it back...you'd have to call them re: their specific return/exchange policy.
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Old 07-23-05, 11:29 AM   #3
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I doubt the better bike will make you substantially faster. Training, however, will.
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Old 07-23-05, 12:52 PM   #4
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How fast are you going now? And how fast do you think you should be going, as a new rider?
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Old 07-23-05, 02:35 PM   #5
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Candidly, there must be another issue. I have three bikes - one high end bike, one dedicated time trial bike, and one cheapo, heavy bike - my Specialized Sequoia. I have had the latter bike up to 36.9 mph on the flats. You should have a great aerobic engine and tremendous leg strength from rowing. I know, in that my kid had a full ride to Syracuse on a rowing scholarship and he could pump 1000 pound leg presses for quite a few reps.

I wonder if you have the proper size bike, and I wonder if you were fitted properly to the bike. So many bike shops don't have a clue as to how to properly fit a bike - a procedure that can take up to two hours or more. AAMOF, I have three hours of fitting invested in my time trial bike, and it fits like a glove when I race it.
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Old 07-23-05, 08:18 PM   #6
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skydive69 is right-on with some solid advice.

Also, I'll toss out as a former collegiate rower (Pennsylvania; lightweight) that even with your awesome aerobic base and leg strength, the sports are different. I'm a lot more proficient on the bike than I ever was on the water. Give it some time to get the body used to moving and exerting effort in different ways. But don't be surprised to find that ultimately you're much more successful in one discipline than the other. Enjoy -- it's a ton of fun!
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Old 07-23-05, 08:28 PM   #7
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I'm not a psychologist, but it sounds like you've got buyer's remorse. You want a more expensive bike, and are using the excuse that the one you have is not fast enough. That's not a valid excuse. If you want a different bike, you won't be happy until you get it, so go for it.

As far as going fast, there are no "cheat codes" or shortcuts. It takes time. Good luck to you whatever you decide, and ride safely.
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Old 07-24-05, 06:55 AM   #8
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I have ridden for years and tried out a trek 1000 last week.I mtnbike and I am wanting to invest in a road bike. I had no trouble getting the bike to go when I wanted it to. It's not the bike.
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Old 07-24-05, 09:05 AM   #9
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BTW, my hat is off to you rowers - I consider it one of the toughest sports ever conceived by man. At Syracuse, they worked out all year, and oftentimes put in three workouts a day - a running event, a lifting event and something either on the water or on an ERG machine. Then there is the competition which is (as far as I can tell from observing) pain personified! In bike racing, you might be in such pain that you decide to slack off - if you do that as part of a crew, you throw off the whole boat. And finally, I have never seen such incredibly conditioned athletes. The varsity 8 looked like clones - 6' 3", about 220 lbs, seemingly no body fat, super leg strength and development and of course the obligatory 6 pack.
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Old 07-24-05, 09:27 AM   #10
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sorry dude to ruin ur day but a better bike really doesnt make u faster. if anythig a better bike reduces fatigue and therefore u can ride longer. i ride a piece of crap work horse and i beat the life out of it and i can kick a lil ass on it. i also have a top of the line bike and can do the same on it. so really bikes wont make tooo much of a difference unless u want to be competitive and ride centuries and stuff.
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Old 07-24-05, 09:55 AM   #11
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It could very well be just the period of adjustment. I didn't really try to hotrod around on my new bike much until I'd been riding it daily for about a week and a half. You have to get used to your new rig and learn to work with its subtleties. I'm getting that you didn't really ride before this, so you will have a bit of learning to do to get the most efficiency out of yourself and your bike.

One thing I'm learning more about since I have gotten my road bike is spinning faster through the range of any given gear I am in. Getting out more rpms in a lower gear actually makes for faster take-offs, and if you run your way down the cassette that way, you can work up to a higher speed more easily than starting in a pretty high gear and just lugging it up to speed.

The bike matters to an extent, but your familiarity with your ride matters more. Heck, I managed to flog a 30mph sprint out of a 40lb mountain bike, and I'm a girl!

Give it some time and work with it some more. The performance will come to you.
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Old 07-24-05, 10:20 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Octopus
skydive69 is right-on with some solid advice.

Also, I'll toss out as a former collegiate rower (Pennsylvania; lightweight) that even with your awesome aerobic base and leg strength, the sports are different. I'm a lot more proficient on the bike than I ever was on the water. Give it some time to get the body used to moving and exerting effort in different ways. But don't be surprised to find that ultimately you're much more successful in one discipline than the other. Enjoy -- it's a ton of fun!
Bingo. This is a huge point for people who are dissapointed in their progress when moving to a new sport. You don't always use the same muscles or even use them in the same manner. You have a good base, you just need to build the cycling structure on top of it. There is the possibility that your bike is not fitted properly to you, but the type of equipment is probably not the problem . As you become more comfortable with cycling in general, then you may want to consider upgrading. Good luck and keep at it.
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Old 07-24-05, 05:25 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonathanrules
i bought a new trek 1000 last week and i've been riding it a bunch around my local roads. it's fun and all, but i feel like my bike isn't allowing me to do what i wanted, ride fast. i row collegiately and have a lot of power in my legs and just feel like i'm not able to go as fast as i want in any gear. i was stubborn not to have waited a couple of weeks to get more money, but i wanted to get into it. do any of you think the shop i bought it from will still take a trade in for a higher end bike?
You say you have alot of power in your legs...maybe you're mashing rather than spinning? it seems like you're wanting a high gear that provides alot of resistance. It's better to spin your legs quickly than to spin slowly on a difficult gear...or so I've heard!
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Old 07-24-05, 07:22 PM   #14
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You will get better components with a higher end bike, but I doubt you will notice any significant speed difference. The gears of 52 front to 12 in the rear is standard in the 1000 to 2100 series.
Ask your bike shop if they are willing to let you upgrade. Good luck and have fun riding.
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Old 07-24-05, 07:40 PM   #15
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Like others have said - upgrading won't do jack. Unless you put a combustion engine on it.
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Old 07-24-05, 08:52 PM   #16
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I started out with an entry-level road bike (Tomasso Capri) and am still riding it over a year (and 3000 miles) later. My bike, unloaded, weighs 25.5 pounds. Regardless, I still am able to outsprint the 16 pound carbon fiber miracle bike guys on my Wednesday group ride. If you aren't racing competitively, the bike is not nealy as important as the engine.
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Old 07-25-05, 12:23 PM   #17
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There are many different muscles in the legs. Having "power" in your legs doesn't necessarily mean you will be able to use it while pedalling.
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Old 07-25-05, 12:30 PM   #18
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There are many different muscles in the legs. Having "power" in your legs doesn't necessarily mean you will be able to use it while pedalling.
Please explain about how one can have power in one's legs but mysteriously not be able to apply it to pedals with power. I can't wait to hear this explanation!
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Old 07-25-05, 12:42 PM   #19
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Being a rower myself (Dad Vail Champion: Light Four; Former Coach: Dowling College), I used to ride heavy (mashing) - its what we do-we want to feel the leg drive - until a friend introduced me too "spinning"

Lighten the load, and start spinning, go for cadence (RPMs). I ride a low-end specialized Allez (with toe-clips even) and I am still able to keep up with most of the "italianos" riding around 20 mph
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Old 07-25-05, 01:10 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skydive69
Please explain about how one can have power in one's legs but mysteriously not be able to apply it to pedals with power. I can't wait to hear this explanation!
Ever seen snatch weight lifters? There's some leg (as well as back, arm, etc) power. I doubt they'd be very fast on a bike though.
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Old 07-25-05, 01:26 PM   #21
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Can't buy speed.

Keep cycling, you'll improve.
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Old 07-25-05, 02:24 PM   #22
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Personally I think jonathan just needs to give it time. Once his muscles get used to riding, he's going to fly. Give it a few weeks.
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Old 07-25-05, 03:06 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skydive69
Please explain about how one can have power in one's legs but mysteriously not be able to apply it to pedals with power. I can't wait to hear this explanation!
Really? You need the explanation? Okay, his explanation was right in the first line: There are a bunch of muscles in the leg and they all do different things. Just because you can push, push, push when you're rowing, doesn't mean you're going to be using the same muscles in the same way to push, pull, push, pull up and down at high cadence on the pedals. Completely different motions. My 5 year old nephew already figured out the need for concentration on each of the different muscle groups.
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Old 07-25-05, 03:50 PM   #24
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Bike sounds too small/tight for you. Also - what wheels/tires you on?
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Old 07-25-05, 05:59 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eggplant Jeff
Ever seen snatch weight lifters? There's some leg (as well as back, arm, etc) power. I doubt they'd be very fast on a bike though.
Why do you doubt it? The snatch is a very athletic lift requiring not only power, but incredible agility and balance. Having said that, it is a bit apples and oranges. A guy doing the snatch might have very little aerobic capacity - I have seen it. Rowers on the other hand have not only incredible leg power, but great upper body strength and typically high VO2max readings - not to mention rather high lactate threshold.
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